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Old October 26th, 2011, 07:50 AM   #11

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Note-This is a repost of a prior post.

Thought some of y'all might like this. It is a virtual tour of Pampanito, SS-383. A Balao-class WWII era US submarine, she is now a museum ship in San Francisco Bay.

USS Pampanito
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Old October 26th, 2011, 07:52 AM   #12

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So who was right?


Note-repost of a prior entry


Prelude:

In June of 1942 the US Pacific Fleet beat the IJN at the Battle of Midway. A large contributor to the Japanese defeat was that the Kido Butai had divided objectives: Not only did they have to take out the shore defenses on Midway, but they also had to neutralize the American fleet, notably their carriers.

Battle of the Philippine Sea:

Fast forward two years to June of 1944, and the tables were turned. The Americans were now on the offensive. The U.S. 5th fleet, commanded by Raymond Spruance, was assigned to cover American landings in the Marianas. A corollary instruction from Chester Nimitz, the Commander of the US Pacific Fleet, was to attack and destroy the Japanese fleet if practical. On the nineteenth, the Japanese Combined Fleet tangled with the more experienced and better equipped US carrier task forces in the Philippine sea. The battle was so one-sided that the American aviators called it the "Marianas Turkey Shoot."

On the 20th Spruance faced a dilemma. He had already sunk three Japanese Carriers and downed 600 aircraft. Should he chase the retreating, but still powerful Japanese fleet, or should he stay to cover the invasion beaches? Spruance, fearing and "end run" at the vulnerable landing craft, chose the latter. Afterward, the Monday-morning quarterbacks made their views known. Spruance, they argued, had failed to aggressively pursue the Japanese fleet allowing them to fight another day. The Naval aviation community was particularly strident in their criticism of Spruance. Significantly though, neither Chester Nimitz (CincPac) nor Ernest King (CNO) were critical of Spruance.

Battle of Leyte Gulf:

Again, fast forward to October of 1944. The Americans were now fulfilling Douglas MacArthur's promise to return to the Philippines. Filling roughly the same role as Spruance had in June, William "Bull" Halsey could not have been more different than his good friend, Spruance. Where Spruance was thoughtful, Halsey was intuitive. Where Spruance was quiet, Halsey was bombastic. Halsey had been the first American Hero in the Pacific, but significantly, had never commanded at any of the great American victories prior to Leyte. Like any military man, Halsey hungered to command at a great battle.

Facing the Americans was a much weakened Imperial Navy, or Nihon Kaigun. Because Admiral Jisaburo Ozawa's carriers and aircrews were so woefully prepared, it was decided to use them as a decoy to lure Halsey's Third Fleet North while the Battleships, cruisers, and destroyers moved in from the flanks. In short, the Japanese were going to try the very thing that Spruance had most feared the previous June; most of the crews knew that they would not be returning. When Halsey caught wind of Ozawa's northern force, he took the bait and went north with all 15 of his fleet and light carriers as well as 6 new fast battleships. Left to support the invasion beaches on Leyte was "MacArthur's Fleet."

The 7th fleet consisted of those ships not good enough to be in the 3rd or 5th fleets. Commanded by Clifton Sprague, the 7th had pre-war battlships, and carriers called "Combustible, Vulnerable, and Expendable" by their crews for their naval designation CVE. Being slow, unarmored and lightly equipped (fleet CVs carried upwards to 100 planes-CVEs carried 20 or less) the CVEs were only deemed useful in a shore bombardment, ASW, and Air defense role. After Halsey left, Sprague dispatched his 6 battleships to cover his left flank in the Surigao Sea. Howevery, because of a series of communications problems, Sprague and Halsey each thought the other was covering the San Bernadino Strait (Sprague's right flank.)

Predictably, Vice-Admiral Takeo Kurita took his gunnery ships through the San Bernadino Strait and fell on the American right flank. With the battleships gone to fight in the Surigao Strait, and Halsey chasing Ozawa the only thing left for Sprague to protect his vulnerable CVEs were small destroyers, and smaller still destroyer escorts. To give some perspective, Yamato's turrets each weighed more than some of the destroyers and destroyer escorts. The 18 knot CVEs tried to run from the 25 knot cruisers and battleships. The results were, of course, predictable. The Japanese battleships and cruisers quickly chewed through the American escorts and went after the CVEs. When they finally caught the Jeep carriers, they sank Gambier Bay. Then, inexplicably, Kurita gave up, and withdrew.

So who was right?

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Old October 26th, 2011, 07:56 AM   #13

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Quote:
Originally Posted by diddyriddick View Post
Note-This is a repost of a prior post.

Thought some of y'all might like this. It is a virtual tour of Pampanito, SS-383. A Balao-class WWII era US submarine, she is now a museum ship in San Francisco Bay.

USS Pampanito
Amazing that she was built in just 9 months.
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Old October 26th, 2011, 07:57 AM   #14

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The Admiral's Revolt


Note-Repost of a prior entry



Wasn't sure where to put this....

October 17, 1949-Time Magazine

"With all the impressive might of a carrier strike, the U.S. Navy last week brought its rebellion into the open. Risking their careers, the Navy's highest-ranking officers ranged themselves in flat opposition to the declared policies of the U.S. Congress, the Secretary of Defense, the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the President of the U.S."


Read more: http://www.time.com/time/magazine/ar...#ixzz0xpnD0ibo
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Old October 26th, 2011, 08:03 AM   #15

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Interesting article on Karl Doenitz


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Though this seems largely to be a recap of the evidence presented against him at Nuremberg, this is an interesting article on Grand Admiral Karl Doenitz, and his role in the Kriegsmarine.

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/...t/Doenitz.html
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Old October 26th, 2011, 11:43 AM   #16

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There is also a sunken German sub off the coast of Lake Worth, Florida. A popular spot with scuba divers. Local legend says that crew would come ashore to shop for groceries. I don’t know if it is true but when I live there in the fifties it was a small, small, nothing and rather isolated. I imagine during the forties is was even less than nothing. It is not that far fetched a thought. Sorry I don't have a link to support this, and the little old ladies that told me this story have been long dead. But I can state there is a sub there. I have seen it.
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Old October 26th, 2011, 12:42 PM   #17

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Here is a War in the Pacific story you won’t find in the books. Unless some writer was talking to my father and stole it. Talking to? Make that listening to. He never shut up. Anyway this is a true story.
First you must understand that in the days before silk screened t-shirts men wore what we called an undershirt. Dad always used the navy lingo, skivvy shirt.
Secondly, we need to be aware that every ship had a stencil cutter which made a stencil of a sailor’s name. This stencil was then used to paint (yes, paint; a crude but efficient process) the sailors name on his hat, his shirt, his locker and everything else he owned.
With that in mind we can jump to the day the ship is nearing port and the scuttlebutt is that the local natives are going to throw a luau with lots of fresh fruit and beverages. The local girls would act was waitresses and distribute said juiciness. The on shore brass had only one objection to this. The native girls always went topless. Remember now, topless bars are way, way in the future. Why… why, it was…gasp… totally unthinkable to have nubile natives serving in such a manner. Well not to worry. The brass came up with a solution. They distributed skivvy shirts to all the ladies. With, of course, the instruction that they must be worn or else. Yes, I know. . . another government cover up.
The girls obviously found the shirts uncomfortable and confining. But they followed orders and wore them. Their solution to the masses yearning to be free was to cut two holes in the shirt and relieve the pressure. Yet, at the same time, not obliterating the stenciled wording, “Juicy Fruit for the Sailors.”
Everybody was happy except the brass whose little get-together, it seems, turned into a coming out party.
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Old October 26th, 2011, 05:15 PM   #18

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This is an excellent thread. Naval history has always interested me, and when I was in the Navy I was able to visit some of the Pacific operational areas like New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, the Marianas and Japan and saw some of the remains that still exist today in these places. It can be very inspiring and evocative and brings the history to life.
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Old October 26th, 2011, 05:17 PM   #19

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I'm in the process of uploading some recorded audio tapes I made from some V&W Destroyer veterans who served in the North Atlantic during WWII. There's quite a lot of background noise though and other people speaking so I need to run them through a programme to clear the unwanted cacophony. I'm not very savvy with this sort of stuff, can anyone recommend some good audio editing programmes? Freeware or other, I'm sure I can 'acquire' them from somewhere...
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Old October 26th, 2011, 07:12 PM   #20

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There is a bunch of freeware noise removers here:
FREE Audio Editors Sound Freeware
I haven't the slightest idea if or how they work.
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