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Old November 11th, 2012, 06:49 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by ugabug View Post
I was just reading something about Gurkhas sneaking into a German barracks and killing most of the soldiers while they slept i was wondering how just how true is this story?
Wiki has the same story:

Gurkha Gurkha

Struggling to think of a time when Gurkhas would be facing German troops who slept in barracks at night though
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Old November 11th, 2012, 07:01 AM   #12

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....the tactics of the Gurkhas was to sneak into the German camps. One German officer supposedly woke up to to see that the men on either side of him were dead, and he would find out his own she laces were cut on his boots, indicating they could have killed him if they wanted (this tale now seems to have been included on wikipedia).
Heard that story with a twist from an uncle who served in Italy - the Gurkhas would feel for the bootlaces when they came across a sleeping soldier; if straight across the tongue, they were British, if crossed or absent, they were German.
Head removal soon followed depending on what they found.
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Old November 11th, 2012, 07:11 AM   #13

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Originally Posted by OccamsRazor View Post
Heard that story with a twist from an uncle who served in Italy - the Gurkhas would feel for the bootlaces when they came across a sleeping soldier; if straight across the tongue, they were British, if crossed or absent, they were German.
Head removal soon followed depending on what they found.
Thanks for that Occam. Tbh, the more I hear and read about these extremely tough people, the more im continually amazed. The loyalty they showed to the British crown over the years has been completely unwavering, and until very very recently, they were never ever getting the credit they deserved from the British government, which is criminal imo.

I read another story, which was in Burma. A Gurkha was in a duel of somekind with a Japanese officer who had drawn his Katana. The Japanese officer cut the Gurkha cleanly, but the Gurkha had decapitated the Japanese officer with his Kukris.
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Old November 11th, 2012, 07:59 AM   #14

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Originally Posted by Mangekyou View Post
Thanks for that Occam. Tbh, the more I hear and read about these extremely tough people, the more im continually amazed. The loyalty they showed to the British crown over the years has been completely unwavering, and until very very recently, they were never ever getting the credit they deserved from the British government, which is criminal imo.

I read another story, which was in Burma. A Gurkha was in a duel of somekind with a Japanese officer who had drawn his Katana. The Japanese officer cut the Gurkha cleanly, but the Gurkha had decapitated the Japanese officer with his Kukris.
There are many stories of Gurkha bravery, toughness and ferocity throughout their service with the British army - and as was previously mentioned, mostly true.
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Old November 11th, 2012, 08:07 AM   #15
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Thanks for that Occam. Tbh, the more I hear and read about these extremely tough people, the more im continually amazed. The loyalty they showed to the British crown over the years has been completely unwavering, and until very very recently, they were never ever getting the credit they deserved from the British government, which is criminal imo.

I read another story, which was in Burma. A Gurkha was in a duel of somekind with a Japanese officer who had drawn his Katana. The Japanese officer cut the Gurkha cleanly, but the Gurkha had decapitated the Japanese officer with his Kukris.
I remember reading a debate on another site about which warriors were the most fearsome in the British army: Gurkhas or Maoris

Most seem to think the Maoris

Fijians have are well represented in the British army too - especially the SAS
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Old November 11th, 2012, 08:15 AM   #16

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Originally Posted by Poly View Post
I remember reading a debate on another site about which warriors were the most fearsome in the British army: Gurkhas or Maoris

Most seem to think the Maoris

Fijians have are well represented in the British army too - especially the SAS
I wouldn't even like to hazard a guess on that, although I have no doubt the Maoris are extremely tough. They kicked British arses in the Maori wars, using their forts.

Notable Fijian SAS actions in the the incident in Oman, where it was 9 SAS and some allies against a few hundred guerillas.
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Old November 11th, 2012, 12:17 PM   #17

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I wouldn't even like to hazard a guess on that, although I have no doubt the Maoris are extremely tough. They kicked British arses in the Maori wars, using their forts.

Notable Fijian SAS actions in the the incident in Oman, where it was 9 SAS and some allies against a few hundred guerillas.
This is the action you're referring to.

Battle_of_Mirbat Battle_of_Mirbat

S/Sgt. Talaiasi Labalaba
Tpr. Sekonaia Takavesi
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Old November 11th, 2012, 01:01 PM   #18

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Originally Posted by OccamsRazor View Post
This is the action you're referring to.

Battle of Mirbat - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

S/Sgt. Talaiasi Labalaba
Tpr. Sekonaia Takavesi
Thats the one!
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Old November 11th, 2012, 01:45 PM   #19

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The Gurkhas fought one of their most famous WWII engagements not far from my location: the battle of Monte Pulito, near San Marino.
The most memorable event of that battle was the sacrifice of the Gurkha rifleman Sher Bahadur Thapa(Victoria Cross recipient), killed on September 19, 1944, while defending his wounded comrades from enemy fire.
More than 700 fallen Gurkhas rest at the Rimini War Cemetery
CWGC - Cemetery Details
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Old November 11th, 2012, 02:45 PM   #20

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Originally Posted by Mangekyou View Post
Thanks for that Occam. Tbh, the more I hear and read about these extremely tough people, the more im continually amazed. The loyalty they showed to the British crown over the years has been completely unwavering, and until very very recently, they were never ever getting the credit they deserved from the British government, which is criminal imo.

I read another story, which was in Burma. A Gurkha was in a duel of somekind with a Japanese officer who had drawn his Katana. The Japanese officer cut the Gurkha cleanly, but the Gurkha had decapitated the Japanese officer with his Kukris.
Nepal is a poor country, if your a bright, go getting young man with any pride and ambition theres not many outlets. On the other hand the British and Indian armies offer high pay, medical support and a lifelong pension. It encourages people to join whose equivalent in western countries would be entrepreneurs, businessmen and sports stars ie the best of the best and it helps that all that high altitude mountain climbing and rural living makes them as tough as nails.

I can't think of a Ghurka story like that, Lachiman Gurung VC is fairly impressive

Quote:
On 12/13 May 1945 at Taungdaw, Burma [now Myanmar], Rifleman Lachhiman Gurung was manning the most forward post of his platoon which bore the brunt of an attack by at least 200 of the Japanese enemy. Twice he hurled back grenades which had fallen on his trench, but the third exploded in his right hand, blowing off his fingers, shattering his arm and severely wounding him in the face, body and right leg. His two comrades were also badly wounded but the rifleman, now alone and disregarding his wounds, loaded and fired his rifle with his left hand for four hours, calmly waiting for each attack which he met with fire at point blank range. Afterwards, when the casualties were counted, it is reported that there were 31 dead Japanese around his position which he had killed, with only one arm.[1]
But the sword story sounds more like George Cairns VC of the Chindits

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Calvert, who led the attack in person, wrote "On the top of Pagoda Hill, not much bigger than two tennis courts, an amazing scene developed. The small white Pagoda was in the centre of the hill. Between that and the slopes which came up was a mêlée of South Staffords and Japanese bayonetting, fighting with each other, with some Japanese just throwing grenades from the flanks into the mêlée." Calvert added, "there, at the top of the hill, about fifty yards square, an extraordinary mêlée took place, everyone shooting, bayoneting, kicking at everyone else, rather like an officers’ guest night."
During the attack Cairns was attacked by a Japanese officer who with his sword hacked off the lieutenant's left arm. Cairns killed the officer and retrieved the fallen sword before wounding several other Japanese. He subsequently collapsed and perished the following day.[5][6] Calvert wrote, "[i]n front I saw Lieut. Cairns have his harm hacked off by a Jap, whom he shot. He picked up the sword and carried on. Finally we drive them back behind the Pagoda
Both of those are pinched from their Wiki pages.
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