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Old November 12th, 2012, 02:57 AM   #21

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Originally Posted by Nemowork View Post
Nepal is a poor country, if your a bright, go getting young man with any pride and ambition theres not many outlets. On the other hand the British and Indian armies offer high pay, medical support and a lifelong pension. It encourages people to join whose equivalent in western countries would be entrepreneurs, businessmen and sports stars ie the best of the best and it helps that all that high altitude mountain climbing and rural living makes them as tough as nails.
Indeed so. The recruits were/are apparently eager to join, and infact sometimes there was too many recruits. It certainly led to a better financial life.

They have repaid that consistently with their complete loyalty and blood amongst numerous battlefileds aroun the globe. The relationship, as you know, building from the war between the two, whereby they gained respect for each others martial abiities.

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I can't think of a Ghurka story like that, Lachiman Gurung VC is fairly impressive



But the sword story sounds more like George Cairns VC of the Chindits



Both of those are pinched from their Wiki pages.
Fascinating stuff. Thanks for that. Thats one of the confusing things, because alot of them come from a few clans, sometimes their names sound similar. At least to me anyway, lol!

The story about the Gurkha and Japanese officer was actually quoted anecdotally in a book I have on the Gurkhas. Ill try and dig it out tonight at home, and quote the full passage
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Old November 13th, 2012, 05:43 AM   #22
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Where the Chindits trained to operate in a similar manner to the Gurkhas in Burma during WWII?
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Old November 13th, 2012, 07:38 AM   #23

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Other way round, the Chindits were an experimental raiding force made up of regular line infantry units so it included Ghurkas, British and commonwealth and Indian Imperial troops at various times.

ie the Ghurkas trained to become Chindits just like all the other infantry units did.

British soldiers serving in the Chindits or alongside the Ghurkas tended to adopt the kukhri although those in other Indian units tended to pick up similar Indian fighting knives, it was the military bling of the era.
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Old November 13th, 2012, 07:44 AM   #24
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Thanks for clearing that up. My great-granddad was in the Chindits, so I've always been interested in them. The idea of being dropped behind enemy lines, especially against a foe like the Japanese, is just an incredible thought.
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Old January 26th, 2016, 03:08 AM   #25

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I was just reading something about Gurkhas sneaking into a German barracks and killing most of the soldiers while they slept i was wondering how just how true is this story?
probably. Australians used to do these kind of shennanigans quite a bit; the tradition was one the AIF created in ww1, where at one point in 1918 the actual army group commander of the german army group opposite the AIF at one point had officers read out a personally written message from him to all soldiers, telling them to harden up and not be so meek and terrified of australian sneak raids, because the raids were actually moving the front line back by considerable amounts

when doing it to the Italians things got hilarious; they'd sometimes just slit a few throats and leave the rest asleep with their shoelaces tied and maybe a couple V for Vittoria pamphlets in their pockets. pretty morale shaking for italians waking up from that haha

actually one time rommel and his 2ic went over in a jeep to inspect some italian position, upon hearing rumours that the australians had been active in the sector that night. imagine their shock to find just hundreds upon hundreds of scattered italian helmets all over the place and not a soldier in sight; turns out the australians had "collected" a whole battalion of italian troops in the middle of the night. lel

Last edited by Hoffies; January 26th, 2016 at 03:11 AM.
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Old January 26th, 2016, 02:50 PM   #26

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probably. Australians used to do these kind of shennanigans quite a bit; the tradition was one the AIF created in ww1, where at one point in 1918 the actual army group commander of the german army group opposite the AIF at one point had officers read out a personally written message from him to all soldiers, telling them to harden up and not be so meek and terrified of australian sneak raids, because the raids were actually moving the front line back by considerable amounts
When was this? because I've not heard of an Army Group abandoning Trench lines because of small trench raids by a force not bigger than an army corps.

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when doing it to the Italians things got hilarious; they'd sometimes just slit a few throats and leave the rest asleep with their shoelaces tied and maybe a couple V for Vittoria pamphlets in their pockets. pretty morale shaking for italians waking up from that haha
Makes a good story but I find it hard to belief that you'd 'slight throats' that silently (you can kill) and then do juvenile tricks when the risk is so great.

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actually one time rommel and his 2ic went over in a jeep to inspect some italian position, upon hearing rumours that the australians had been active in the sector that night. imagine their shock to find just hundreds upon hundreds of scattered italian helmets all over the place and not a soldier in sight; turns out the australians had "collected" a whole battalion of italian troops in the middle of the night. lel
Why would Rommel care about such things?

I suspect its another tall story.
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Old January 26th, 2016, 10:21 PM   #27
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Most Ghurka stories tend now to contain a lot of fiction. Especially the sneaking into camps, testing boot laces and throat cutting. They are very courageous fighters and very loyal. In WWII when The Japanese took Singapore, they recruited a great number of Indian soldiers into their "Indian National Army". Not a single Ghurka crossed the line to join them. In Burma in 1942, one Ghurka made his way through the Jungle and weeks later crossed back into British Lines in India. When asked how he found his way back he explained that he had a map! he then produced said map, a street map of London!

The hyped up stories do help though. In the Falklands War in 1982 the Argentinians abandoned Mount William without a fight simply because the enemy forces advancing towards them were the 2nd Battalion, 7th Ghurka Rifles.
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Old January 27th, 2016, 03:35 AM   #28
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Most Ghurka stories tend now to contain a lot of fiction. Especially the sneaking into camps, testing boot laces and throat cutting. They are very courageous fighters and very loyal. In WWII when The Japanese took Singapore, they recruited a great number of Indian soldiers into their "Indian National Army". Not a single Ghurka crossed the line to join them. In Burma in 1942, one Ghurka made his way through the Jungle and weeks later crossed back into British Lines in India. When asked how he found his way back he explained that he had a map! he then produced said map, a street map of London!

The hyped up stories do help though. In the Falklands War in 1982 the Argentinians abandoned Mount William without a fight simply because the enemy forces advancing towards them were the 2nd Battalion, 7th Ghurka Rifles.
Exactly, thatīs the reason because I said that soldiers were a gang of.... they were victims of their own propaganda (Poor argies!).
If they had read more books and less propaganda.. they knew the many many times Gurkhas were defeated: From Chinese, Mongols, Turks, British, Germans, Afghan, Japanese etc etc etc.. .From Neuve Chapelle to Kut-el-Amara or from Toburk to Monte-Cassino.. Gurkhas were defeated, .but fortunatly for them... Argies read nothing about Military history...

it is funny, the 2/7 Ghurka Rifle was made POW by Turks in Kut-el-Amara...

There was a Gurkha battalion in Kut (the 2/7).

Really, the Osmanīsons arenīt the "argies"...The poor inmigrants really believed you canīt kill a Gurkha or to made POW...Why? Propaganda... Turks didnīt believe in Propaganda... Argies yes...

Last edited by martin76; January 27th, 2016 at 03:38 AM.
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Old January 27th, 2016, 04:42 AM   #29
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Exactly, thatīs the reason because I said that soldiers were a gang of.... they were victims of their own propaganda (Poor argies!).
If they had read more books and less propaganda.. they knew the many many times Gurkhas were defeated: From Chinese, Mongols, Turks, British, Germans, Afghan, Japanese etc etc etc.. .From Neuve Chapelle to Kut-el-Amara or from Toburk to Monte-Cassino.. Gurkhas were defeated, .but fortunatly for them... Argies read nothing about Military history...

it is funny, the 2/7 Ghurka Rifle was made POW by Turks in Kut-el-Amara...

There was a Gurkha battalion in Kut (the 2/7).

Really, the Osmanīsons arenīt the "argies"...The poor inmigrants really believed you canīt kill a Gurkha or to made POW...Why? Propaganda... Turks didnīt believe in Propaganda... Argies yes...
I don't think hyped up propaganda had as much to do with it as trying to occupy the Islands with untrained conscripts.

The British para's also have a hyped up reputation when you really look at there record as para's.

The Gurka's reputation in the army is some what different to what it is outside. Their attributes are well known and well respected in the forces, but they tend to have some negatives that many civvies never her about.
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Old January 27th, 2016, 05:06 AM   #30

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There are so many stories. One I heard was that the crew of a British ship during the war refused to transport Ghurkas. So they put the Ghurkas in the hold and welded every access shut. Naturally, by the end of the trip, the Ghurkas were on deck somehow - no one ever knew how.
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