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Old November 17th, 2012, 03:43 PM   #11
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In today's London ''Daily Mail''(Saturday November 10) there is a good article about the last Japanese war crime of W.W.2 when between three days and a week or so after Japan surrendered in Tokyo Bay in September 1945 to the allies, seven Allied airmen were beheaded with Samurai swords for their part in bombing Japan's major oil facilty at Palembang in Indonesia in 1944.
Before this crime was discovered thanks to a Japanese whistle blower the allies originally assumed that the seven beheaded men had died of starvation while in Japanese captivity (a not uncommon event) but this Japanese officer whistleblower showed that the seven allied pilots who had been captured during the Palambeng bombing raids after bailing out were in fact,and beheaded BUT NOT UNTIL AFTER the surrender in Tokyo Bay had been signed.
Was this a war crime?-the allies thought so as they hunted down the Perpetrators and executed them-even though -technically the crime took place in peacetime as the Seconf War War had ended days previously.
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Old November 17th, 2012, 03:48 PM   #12
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In today's London ''Daily Mail''(Saturday November 10) there is a good article about the last Japanese war crime of W.W.2 when between three days and a week or so after Japan surrendered in Tokyo Bay in September 1945 to the allies, seven Allied airmen were beheaded with Samurai swords for their part in bombing Japan's major oil facilty at Palembang in Indonesia in 1944.
Before this crime was discovered thanks to a Japanese whistle blower the allies originally assumed that the seven beheaded men had died of starvation while in Japanese captivity (a not uncommon event) but this Japanese officer whistleblower showed that the seven allied pilots who had been captured during the Palambeng bombing raids after bailing out were in fact,and beheaded BUT NOT UNTIL AFTER the surrender in Tokyo Bay had been signed.
Was this a war crime?-the allies thought so as they hunted down the Perpetrators and executed them-even though -technically the crime took place in peacetime as the Seconf War War had ended days previously.
It's never finished until it's finished.

It was no doubt a war atrocity.

It may have been a war crime too just if it was committed by the defeated party.
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Old November 17th, 2012, 04:03 PM   #13

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No, I'm not wrong .
But you are.
The Hague conventions are the internationally accepted laws of war, that are accepted by all the major nations.
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Old November 17th, 2012, 04:12 PM   #14
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But you are.
The Hague conventions are the internationally accepted laws of war, that are accepted by all the major nations.
Nope.

Again; the Hague coventions are ignored whenever so is required.

And they are enforced just by the winner just on the other side .



That said, I couldn't help but note that you have been unable to point any superior authority that may enforce such laws.

Guess you are not going to suggest the same United Nations so systematically ignored by any major power and even Israel when required.

Any relevant evidence you would like to share with us on this relevant last point?

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Old November 17th, 2012, 04:30 PM   #15
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I wrote the orginal post of the top of my head from memory but now I've been able to re-read the article and wish to make some correctons.
A-THERE WERE NINE-NOT SEVEN pilots beheaded After the Unconditional Japanese surrender in Tokyo on August 15 1945.
B-These executions by decapitation by Samurai sword took place AFTER AUGUST 15 1945. at Changi, Singapore.
Two of those Japanese officers responsible commtted sucide; two were hanged and one imprisoned.
On question that this incident does raise is that-given these post surrnder excutions took place in Singapore at Changi and Singapore had surrendered to the allies on August 15 what the heck were the occupying troops doing during the ten days or so after the August 15 surrender?
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Old November 17th, 2012, 05:10 PM   #16
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Awfully dumb of those Japanese to execute POWs after the surrender.
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Old November 17th, 2012, 05:15 PM   #17
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Awfully dumb of those Japanese to execute POWs after the surrender.
You tell me; some of them were actually dumb enough to continue fighting at least until 1974...

Click the image to open in full size.
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Old November 18th, 2012, 03:51 AM   #18
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You tell me; some of them were actually dumb enough to continue fighting at least until 1974...

Click the image to open in full size.
The Japanese soldier in WW2 is interesting with regards to atrocities. Not only did Japan commit atrocities, but during the island hopping campaign it became routine for the Americans to commit what would appear at first glance to be atrocities. The truth is, the Japanese soldier just would not surrender most of the time. There were many cases where Japanese soldiers acted like they were surrendering, only to reach for a grenade. I have seen interviews of American soldiers who said that they stopped trying to take prisoners, and just shot the Japanese on site no matter what.
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Old November 18th, 2012, 03:59 AM   #19
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The Japanese soldier in WW2 is interesting with regards to atrocities. Not only did Japan commit atrocities, but during the island hopping campaign it became routine for the Americans to commit what would appear at first glance to be atrocities. The truth is, the Japanese soldier just would not surrender most of the time. There were many cases where Japanese soldiers acted like they were surrendering, only to reach for a grenade. I have seen interviews of American soldiers who said that they stopped trying to take prisoners, and just shot the Japanese on site no matter what.
And atrocities for all, right?

Yup, that's the natural history of war out of the epic fable books.
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Old November 18th, 2012, 04:16 AM   #20
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And atrocities for all, right?

Yup, that's the natural history of war out of the epic fable books.
I take it your point is that atrocities are far more common in war than we would like to believe. To the victors go the spoils, to the vanquished go prosecution for war crimes.
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