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Old November 21st, 2012, 02:16 PM   #11
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Interesting table Gorge. But does this take into account things that soldiers get cheap, or free, that civilians in their own country would have to pay for.
maybe just the best paid not so sure
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Old November 21st, 2012, 02:33 PM   #12

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only professional armies can be counted, I dont know why did you include Russia while it is mostly recruited of low paid conscripts
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Old November 21st, 2012, 03:30 PM   #13

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Most enlisted recruits of the US armed forces should be an E-2, private first class (Army), after training is complete. The base pay is $19,400 annually. In the US, all citizens military or civilian who make below federally established income levels for food stamps based on the number of dependents in a household qualify for them.

Oops... a young E-2 with in a household of 3 would qualify for food stamps. I forgot to mention that the food stamp program, though federal, is administered by the individual states who can increase the maximum income limits at their descretion. Alaska and Hawaii have done so. No state can lower the maximum income limit, though.

Last edited by Spartacuss; November 21st, 2012 at 03:37 PM.
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Old November 21st, 2012, 05:37 PM   #14
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The Brits of my parents generation used to say the the ''Yanks were overpaid'' in W.W.2 relative to their British services counterparts and certainly U.S serviceman in W.W. 2 were better paid than the Brits were.
I have before me a booklet issued to every American G.I. serving in Great Britain between 1942-45 and under the heading of ''Some important Do's and Don't's'' says ''You are higher paid than the British Tommy''.Don't rub it in. Play fair with him...''
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Old November 21st, 2012, 07:43 PM   #15
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People who join the army don't do it to get rich, they mostly do it for the secured pay, three meals a day and the adventure.
Adventure? How many armies in the world engage in adventure? As far as I know it from the armies of my country those that join it do it:

1.They were undisciplined as a child, where punished by getting drafted into a military school and this warped their mind so much they know admire the uptight mentality and discipline of the army

2.They are extremely poor and want out

3.They as sadists and control freaks and are willing to do some anilingus to their superiors in exchange for some power over underlings forced to do anilingus onto them (a la human centipede) and because they hope they can climb up the ladder to gain more anilingual underlings (this is why military culture is reduced to bullying those under your control)
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Old November 21st, 2012, 09:22 PM   #16
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The Brits of my parents generation used to say the the ''Yanks were overpaid'' in W.W.2 relative to their British services counterparts and certainly U.S serviceman in W.W. 2 were better paid than the Brits were.
I have before me a booklet issued to every American G.I. serving in Great Britain between 1942-45 and under the heading of ''Some important Do's and Don't's'' says ''You are higher paid than the British Tommy''.Don't rub it in. Play fair with him...''
One of our complaints during the 90's and early part of this century was that US and other troops didn't pay tax while on deployment but we did. We were often told that we were better paid than many other troops over all. Seems like they were not lieing.
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Old November 21st, 2012, 09:54 PM   #17

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One of our complaints during the 90's and early part of this century was that US and other troops didn't pay tax while on deployment but we did. We were often told that we were better paid than many other troops over all. Seems like they were not lieing.
Probably so, Bish. For American servicemen, Federal income tax and social security taxes are deducted from their base pay.State income taxes are the individual state's discretion. My home of record, for military purposes, is Georgia. When I was in the AF Georgia did not exempt military citizens from state income taxes no matter where I was stationed in the world, but I was exempted from paying social security tax. During the Reagan years, that changed. However, my flight pay, combat pay, and later hazardous duty pay was not subject to any taxes. I left the service nearly 35 year ago, so some of the above may have changed.

Oh yeah... My brother was stationed in the UK near London for 4 years. He got a COLA (Cost of Living Allowance) due to the high costs there, and he had his family with him.

Last edited by Spartacuss; November 21st, 2012 at 10:00 PM. Reason: for clarity
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Old November 21st, 2012, 10:04 PM   #18

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Originally Posted by Spartacuss View Post
Most enlisted recruits of the US armed forces should be an E-2, private first class (Army), after training is complete. The base pay is $19,400 annually. In the US, all citizens military or civilian who make below federally established income levels for food stamps based on the number of dependents in a household qualify for them.

Oops... a young E-2 with in a household of 3 would qualify for food stamps. I forgot to mention that the food stamp program, though federal, is administered by the individual states who can increase the maximum income limits at their descretion. Alaska and Hawaii have done so. No state can lower the maximum income limit, though.
An E-2 is not a Private First Class in the US Army.

Also, we should take into account the discrepancy in pay between single soldiers and married soldiers.
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Old November 21st, 2012, 11:11 PM   #19

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An E-2 is not a Private First Class in the US Army.

Also, we should take into account the discrepancy in pay between single soldiers and married soldiers.
I believe it was when I was in back in the 70's. I know it was in the Marines. I did confuse the rank with the current pay in my earlier post.
In my time, the difference in pay between married and single troops could get complicated. It was possible for a married troop live in the barracks on base, forfeiting his housing allowance while his family lived "on the economy". This worked well if the spouse had a decent income, and was actually better for the family budget. Childless married troops stationed at the same base would often do the same. One of them would have to forfeit the allowance if they lived together off base, both if they lived in base family housing. Again, I speak of my time in the 70's.
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Old November 21st, 2012, 11:19 PM   #20

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I believe it was when I was in back in the 70's. I know it was in the Marines.
In my time, the difference in pay between married and single troops could get complicated. It was possible for a married troop live in the barracks on base, forfeiting his housing allowance while his family lived "on the economy". This worked well if the spouse had a decent income, and was actually better for the family budget. Childless married troops stationed at the same base would often do the same. One of them would have to forfeit the allowance if they lived together off base, both if they lived in base family housing. Again, I speak of my time in the 70's.
Well it is still pretty complicated (one thing we can always rely on the government for) but basically it works like this:

A Soldier married to a civilian gets a Basic Allowance for Housing (BAH) which is based on the average income and cost of living of the area. If the soldier and his spouse live on base, they are still paid this money but the amount is deducted from their paycheck automatically so they never actually see it. If they live off post the amount gets added to their base pay and they can do whatever they want with it.

If two soldiers are married they both get BAH, but one of them gets a lesser amount.

Single soldiers under the grade of E6 get no housing money and live in barracks. This means that for lower enlisted soldiers there is a huge profit motive to get married young as well as the luxury of being able to move out of the barracks.
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