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Old November 28th, 2012, 11:12 AM   #11

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Quote:
Originally Posted by M.E.T.H.O.D. View Post
One of the best tactics against heavily-armored foes, without directly using weapons, was to let the enemies fall from exhaustion and fatigue(with your head fully inside an helmet your breathability rapidly decreases; the sun was another adversary for the full-armored knights) then simply kill or capture them...Of course in order to perform this, you had to resist the impetus of killing cans coming at you.
The sun! Hah! Try that trick in Scotland!
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Old November 28th, 2012, 11:25 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by bartieboy View Post
The sun! Hah! Try that trick in Scotland!
It has been known to make the odd appearance here you know.
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Old November 28th, 2012, 11:48 AM   #13

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Also weapons like polearms and halberds were effective at pulling knights onto the ground, and it was much harder to stand back up in full plate armor, especially in the bloody mud of most battlefields.
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Old November 28th, 2012, 02:45 PM   #14

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Originally Posted by bartieboy View Post
The sun! Hah! Try that trick in Scotland!
They have their own version in Scotland.

The Midgie. One of them inside your helmet for an hour and you'll be begging for death. And they swarm...dear god they swarm!


Then theres plan B, you're running round swatting the midgies with you're sword and you never see the bog until you're knee deep...try getting out of that when your steel boots are strapped on.
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Old November 28th, 2012, 02:57 PM   #15

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Originally Posted by Nemowork View Post
They have their own version in Scotland.

The Midgie. One of them inside your helmet for an hour and you'll be begging for death. And they swarm...dear god they swarm!


Then theres plan B, you're running round swatting the midgies with you're sword and you never see the bog until you're knee deep...try getting out of that when your steel boots are strapped on.
Oh god yes I know those...
Horrible little creatures who should go extinct.
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Old November 28th, 2012, 03:30 PM   #16

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Originally Posted by The Cell View Post
The longbow. We know full well what kind of devastation this weapon against the great and glorious Knights. Best of all, the cost of training and equipping peasants with Longbows was ridiculously cheap compared to raising, training, equipping and maintaining knights.
The longbow was useful for killing horses, not for penetrating plate armour (especially not at any significant distance). Plate armour is essentially impervious to all piercing and bladed weapons. But that being said, if you were hit in the head with a greatsword even while wearing a helmet, there's still enough concussive force to put you down on the ground and knock you out cold.
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Old November 28th, 2012, 05:14 PM   #17

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Crossbows and especially gunpowder arquebuses were developed as a response to the increasing impregnability of plate armor. Some other weapons such as "crows' eyes" (pointy hammers) and pikes could penetrate plate if used correctly. Pikes were effective because they would be braced against the ground, meaning that no matter how hard the knight hit the pike with his armor, it would not move and either the knight would end up impaled or the pike would break.

Even chain armor was fairly difficult to penetrate with anything but specialized weapons. Quality chain armor was also very resistant, even to longbows.
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Old November 28th, 2012, 05:46 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by Naomasa298 View Post
All these X vs Y threads got me thinking about the value of heavy armour.

Our stereotypical image of a knight is possibly the Romantic ideal of a man clad in full sheets of metal, virtually impervious to swords and spears, lumbering around the battlefield with limited vision. A samurai was more nimble, but with inferior protection. His armour was lacquered with some plates sewn on for protection.

But these stereotypes aren't true. I've worn replica plate armour. Its total weight is comparable to, if not lighter than to a modern soldier's pack, and because the weight is well distributed, is nowhere near as difficult to move around with compared to if you were just carrying around an equivalent weight.

One of the things that contribute to our stereotypical image of medieval suit of armor being heavy is that jousting armor, as opposed to actual combart armor, was heavy. Jousting armor could weight up to 100 lbs, and did require a hoist to lower the person onto a horse. Jousting armor could be much heavier than combat armor, since it was a sport, and you could afford to maximize protection at the expense of mobility.

Here is an exert from the DIA (Detroit Art Institute) guide book to their armor collection (the DIA has a nice medieval armor collection):

Quote:
Notice the large screw, nuts, and bolts on this armor. They were used to attach the extra plates of armor to protect the knight from a lance’s blow. This suit weighs a whopping 88 pounds! Sure, it’s sturdy and protective, but it’s not very easy to move around in. In fact, jousting armor was so bulky and heavy that someone had to help the knight put it on and get onto his horse! http://dia.emsix.com/assets/pdf/gallery-guide-armor.pdf
The jousting armor is typically the most impressive, and probably the least used armor, so that is probably what museums show in their display, and most people exposure to actual armor is based on museum displays.
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Old November 28th, 2012, 05:52 PM   #19

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the best part is you can buy swords like that at cold steel armories my sister is into samurai stuff. i like medieval stuff but when mgs were invented awesome stuff Click the image to open in full size.
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Old November 28th, 2012, 08:32 PM   #20

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I remember reading about the death of Warwick the Kingmaker in the 'Groundwork of British History".
It was said that Armour made battle safe but flight/retreat often fatal.
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