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Old December 14th, 2012, 10:00 AM   #31

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This light tank, which nickname obviously was 'Babe', had its war and its victories in Stalingrad itself, and among its crew was another WW2 lady, Ekaterina Petlyuk, one of 19 Soviet tank women...

Later, this lady was fighting in Kursk and in the same battle was killed Ada's father.
Respect. The brave women of the Red Army were treated atrociously by the Germans.

They didn't have an easy time after the war either. I recently read a book by Svietlana Aleksijewitsh containing some of their life stories.
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Old December 14th, 2012, 10:06 AM   #32

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This is something which should be highlighted for popular culture imho, I'm surprised the feminists haven't got their hands on it. Even in the Russian postwar movies women are given roles of nurse, the only film I've seen which has a woman soldier is Enemy at the Gates and that role was underrated too.

School history for the West mainly states that women took the jobs of men and worked in munitions factories/buses etc. It's far too limited in scope.
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Old December 14th, 2012, 10:11 AM   #33

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This is something which should be highlighted for popular culture imho, I'm surprised the feminists haven't got their hands on it. Even in the Russian postwar movies women are given roles of nurse, the only film I've seen which has a woman soldier is Enemy at the Gates and that role was underrated too.

School history for the West mainly states that women took the jobs of men and worked in munitions factories/buses etc. It's far too limited in scope.
If that's true about Britain, you should set the record straight. It's definitely not our problem - during the Iron Curtain times we were fed heroic Red Army exploits around the clock (Soviet women soldiers included)

What was deliberately and persistently underrated or ignored were our Polish Home Army women (and men). And mentioning a girl like "Inka" would have gotten any girl (including yours truly's younger alterego) into the clink and out of university education.
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Old December 14th, 2012, 10:11 AM   #34

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Yes the Russians didn't mind having women combatants on the frontline. They had women flying front line aircraft, of course their snipers are well known too. I'm glad this thread has taken off so well as I was expecting a lot of information on the West.

The Germans also had women on the frontline near the very end of WW2.

Click the image to open in full size.


I've always thought this one was quite pretty, something to do with the indefatigable glare in her eye. I never found out what her story was, I expect she didn't have much of a chance seeing as she was in the SS.

I must confess reading some of this troubles me a bit psychologically, must be my old fashioned upbringing. Women being beaten to death and guillotined proves there's not much chivalry left in warfare. Mind you the Taleban are still shooting 14 year old girls today.
I think she's a member of the SS-Helferinnenkorps Earl. It means 'helper corps' and she wouldn't have technically been a member of the SS as they didn't allow women. I doubt if that distinction would have made much difference in post-war/end-of-war reprisals though.
Her duties would have been something like admin, or concentration camp guard. I don't know a great deal about it, maybe someone else does?

(Also women have always suffered in warfare, it's by no means a modern trend. "By Sword and Fire: Cruelty and Atrocity in Medieval Warfare" by Sean McGlynn is an interesting if somewhat disturbing read on the topic.)
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Old December 14th, 2012, 10:29 AM   #35

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Even in the Russian postwar movies women are given roles of nurse, the only film I've seen which has a woman soldier is Enemy at the Gates and that role was underrated too.
Why? For example, there was Soviet movie solely about 'Night Witches' story. Or famous 'A Zori zdes Tihie' / 'The Dawns Here are Quite'.

And Enemy at the Gates isn't Russian movie at all, btw, not to mention that it made me puke.

Last edited by Putzi; December 14th, 2012 at 12:15 PM.
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Old December 14th, 2012, 10:29 AM   #36

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If that's true about Britain, you should set the record straight. It's definitely not our problem - during the Iron Curtain times we were fed heroic Red Army exploits around the clock (Soviet women soldiers included)

What was deliberately and persistently underrated or ignored were our Polish Home Army women (and men). And mentioning a girl like "Inka" would have gotten any girl (including yours truly's younger alterego) into the clink and out of university education.

In the excellent movie liberation/Osvobozhdenie, the main female role, Zoia, is a nurse. Tho I do admit there's a few famous red army women I've heard of, in my limited viewings of Russian TV I haven't come across many showing them as soldiers.


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I think she's a member of the SS-Helferinnenkorps Earl. It means 'helper corps' and she wouldn't have technically been a member of the SS as they didn't allow women. I doubt if that distinction would have made much difference in post-war/end-of-war reprisals though.
Her duties would have been something like admin, or concentration camp guard. I don't know a great deal about it, maybe someone else does?

(Also women have always suffered in warfare, it's by no means a modern trend. "By Sword and Fire: Cruelty and Atrocity in Medieval Warfare" by Sean McGlynn is an interesting if somewhat disturbing read on the topic.)


From my limited info I understand she's a telegraphist from Berlin circa 1945. I came across the pic a few years back on Axis History Forum.

Quote:
SS Fernschreiberin in FHA Berlin

("Der Freiwillige," January 1975)
Axis History Forum • View topic - Female Auxiliary Photographs

Also a good thread for photos of German women in uniform, if that's your sort of thing...
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Old December 14th, 2012, 10:47 AM   #37

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Aha, yes. 'Fernschreiberin' translates as 'Telex Operator' according to Google... thanks for the link. And I'm saying nothing about my 'thing'

A good collection of pics here - World War II: Women at War - In Focus - The Atlantic - of women in WW2.

In Japan if a woman wasn't conscripted into factory work or similar she might well have ended up pressed in to the 'Comfort Corps' which was comprised of women from Japan and occupied colonies.

Women's Day hears voice of "comfort women", WWII survivors/victims, for justice, compensation, apology. Japanese Gov denies all | WcP Blog

https://sites.google.com/site/womeni...-women-in-wwii
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