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Old November 11th, 2013, 02:47 AM   #1

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A Baboon fought at Passchendaele, WW1.


SAMVOA - South African Military Veterans Organisation of Australasia

Monkey Business ? Futility Closet


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Quote:
At night when on guard duty with Albert, he was particularly useful because of his keen eyesight and acute hearing. He could give early warning of enemy movement or impending attacks with a series of short, sharp barks and tuggings at Pte Marr`s tunic. Jackie wore his uniform with panache, would light up a cigarette or pipe for a pal and always saluted an officer passing on his rounds. He would stand at ease when requested, placing his feet apart and hands behind his back in regimental style. At the mess table he used a knife and fork in a proper manner and cleverly used his drinking basin.


Although an animal, we, of course, will never know what Jackie felt, when he was in the midst of the nightmare that was Delville Wood or Passchendaele, nor afterwards in the desperate fighting round Kemmel Hill.
Up to now he and Albert had come through the war unscathed but in April 1918, the South African Brigade was being heavily shelled as they withdrew to Reninghelst. Jackie was seen to be frantically trying to build a wall of stones about himself, as shelter from flying shrapnel, while shells were bursting all around. The wall was never completed. A jagged piece of shrapnel wounded him in the arm and another in the leg. At first Jackie refused to be evacuated by the stretcher-bearers; he tried vainly to continue with his wall, hobbling around in excruciating pain, on what had once been a leg.

In the words of Lt-Col R N Woodsend of the Royal Medical Corp.
It was a pathetic sight; the little fellow, carried by his keeper, lay moaning in pain,
the man crying his eyes out in sympathy, "You must do something for him, he
saved my life in Egypt. He nursed me through dysentery". The baboon was badly
wounded, the left leg hanging with shreds of muscle, another jagged wound in the
right arm.
We decided to give the patient chloroform and dress his wounds. If he died under
the anaesthetic perhaps it would be the best thing; as I had never given an
anaesthetic to such a patient before, I thought it would be the most likely
result. However, he lapped up the chloroform as if it had been whiskey, and
was well under in a remarkably short time. It was a simple matter to amputate the
leg with scissors and I cleaned the wounds and dressed them as well as I could.
He came around as quickly as he went under. The problem then was what to do
with him. This was soon settled his keeper: "He is on army strength". So, duly
labelled, number, name, ATS injection, nature of injuries, etc. he was taken to the
road and sent by a passing ambulance to the Casualty Clearing Station.

It was the end of active service for Albert and Jackie, with the war coming to an end.
They were shipped to England, where Jackie became a celebrity, receiving much publicity in the English newspapers. From early September to 14 February 1919, Jackie and Private Marr were lent to the Red Cross by the War Office and the South African Government for the purpose of collecting money for the sick and wounded soldiers.

On 5 May 1919, Jackie and Albert were on their last leg of their journey home to Pretoria and Cheshire Farm.
Jackie had been officially discharged at Maitland Dispersal Camp in Cape Town on 26 April. On his arm, Jackie wore one gold wound stripe and three blue service chevrons, indicating three years frontline service. At Maitland he received the usual parchment discharge paper, military pension, plus a Civil Employment Form for discharged soldiers.

After their arrival home, Jackie was again feted and became the centre of attention on occasions such as the parade to welcome back officially the 1st SAI Brigade and at the Peace Parade in Church Square, Pretoria on 31 July 19120, where he received the Pretoria Citizen's Service Medal .

Jackie died a day after a fire destroyed the farmhouse on 22 May 1921 and Albert Marr passed away at the age of 84 in Pretoria in August 1973.

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Whatever you do don't call him a monkey, he doesn't like being called a monkey.

-EoR
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Old November 11th, 2013, 05:33 AM   #2

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It is amazing, EoR. Jackie looks very good in armed forces uniform. Let me save these pictures. Thanks a lot!!!
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Old November 11th, 2013, 06:29 AM   #3

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what a great story! stubby the pitbull was the most decorated hero dog of WW 1: [ame=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sergeant_Stubby]Sergeant Stubby - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia[/ame]

Sergeant Stubby (1916 or 1917 April 4, 1926), was the most decorated [ame="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_dog"]war dog[/ame] of [ame="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_War_I"]World War I[/ame] and the only dog to be promoted to sergeant through combat. America's first war dog, Stubby served for 18 months and participated in seventeen battles on the Western Front. He saved his regiment from surprise mustard gas attacks, found and comforted the wounded, and even once caught a German spy by the seat of his pants, holding him there until American soldiers found him. Back home his exploits were front page news of every major newspaper.

it's amazing what animals will do to protect the humans they love!
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Old November 11th, 2013, 12:49 PM   #4

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every unit needs its mascot and this certainly makes an exception for one, good post earl
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Old November 14th, 2013, 09:49 AM   #5
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Fascinating thanks
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Old November 14th, 2013, 12:25 PM   #6

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Excellent, that would make a great blog entry.
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Old November 14th, 2013, 12:45 PM   #7

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He had good posture..... very military.
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Old November 14th, 2013, 01:55 PM   #8

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Excellent post Earl.
He looked smarter than some soldiers I knew.

Can we extend the thread to include other mascots/pets that fought in wars?
I can only think of two - Woytek the bear who served with the Poles at Monte Cassino and Prince Rupert's dog, Boye, killed at the battle of Marston Moor.
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Old November 14th, 2013, 11:26 PM   #9

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Quote:
Originally Posted by OccamsRazor View Post
Excellent post Earl.
He looked smarter than some soldiers I knew.

Can we extend the thread to include other mascots/pets that fought in wars?
I can only think of two - Woytek the bear who served with the Poles at Monte Cassino and Prince Rupert's dog, Boye, killed at the battle of Marston Moor.
The Lafayette Escadrille had two lion mascots, appropriately named Whiskey and Soda.

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That's Whiskey wrestling with ace Raoul Lufberry. Soda is in the background.
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Old November 15th, 2013, 05:44 AM   #10

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scaeva View Post
The Lafayette Escadrille had two lion mascots, appropriately named Whiskey and Soda.

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That's Whiskey wrestling with ace Raoul Lufberry. Soda is in the background.
now lions would make some badass soldiers! imagine hunkering down in your bunker. you pop your head up and see a lion in your face yikes! but surely they could have given them better names than whiskey and soda? i read that lions have a sense of smell 7x better than any dog so that may have come in handy! of course if they ran out of fresh meat to feed their lions they might become dinner..

more lion stories: http://blog.nasm.si.edu/archives/lio...lion-cubs-too/

more critters who have served in the military: http://www.mnn.com/earth-matters/ani...y/soldier-bear

Last edited by kbear; November 15th, 2013 at 05:56 AM.
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