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Old March 7th, 2014, 11:25 PM   #1
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Militia tradition in England


After reading something about militias, I bumped into a page (
Fyrd Fyrd
).

1. Is the militia tradition in England a legacy of Anglo-Saxon's fyrd? The info on this article isn't enough.
2. How was England's pre-modern militia organization different from the ones in continental Europe (regardless of the time period)?

Sorry for being vague. I have been fascinated by militias in history.
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Old March 8th, 2014, 07:24 AM   #2

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Yes and no to both questions. Here's one book I've glanced through on the issue, it concerns the development of England's militia system throughout the modern period:
The Amateur Military Tradition: 1558-1945 - Ian Frederick William Beckett - Google Books
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Old March 8th, 2014, 07:41 AM   #3
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Wasn't there some kind of a "feudal duty" towards the Lord of the land in Medieval times.

(even outside anglo-saxon lands)

I mean that, in a feudal army, there would still be farmer commoners sometimes. Pressed into service momentarily for important battles, they couldn't be often relied upon as good soldiers, because they were commoners primarily. (i.e. not men-at-arms) But the duty was there wasn't it. The troops which were mobilized would be called feudal levy.
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Old March 8th, 2014, 11:09 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Late347 View Post
Wasn't there some kind of a "feudal duty" towards the Lord of the land in Medieval times.

(even outside anglo-saxon lands)
That's true but as far as I know feudalism and the military organization at that time was applied rather slightly differently region by region. But I don't know much about this unfortunately.
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Old March 9th, 2014, 02:01 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by needstablity View Post
That's true but as far as I know feudalism and the military organization at that time was applied rather slightly differently region by region. But I don't know much about this unfortunately.

well the basics is that anglo-saxons came from the geographical regions of northern Germany, originally. Northern Germany and Denmark. The tribes used to live there before invading British isles.

Angles, saxons and jutes were the three tribes which poured into Old England, after Roman times in Britain ended.

Jutes came from around Denmark I think. Saxons are the most popular of those tribes, from Germany. And Angles tribe also came from somewhere around Germany.
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Old March 9th, 2014, 07:15 PM   #6
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Late 347 the whole English Feudal system was based on the King giving land and titles to certain local chiefs who were bound, in time of war to provide themselves and their feudal flunkies in time of war to fight for the monarch.
n Scotland long after Feudalism was abolished in England it persisted in the Scottish Highlands where the Clan system was totally fuedal.
The an chief granted land to Clan members to support themselves with in exchange for the absolute right of calling them you obligatory military service against frival Clans or the English or as at the Battle of Culloden in 1746-against Lowlnder Protestant supporters of the German Hanoverian King George ruler of Great Britain.
One god thing to emerge from the Highlanders defeat at Culloden was that the feudal power of chiefs was broken forever.
However, the obligations to pay feudal taxes like FEU-Duty which every Scottish houseowner had to pat until Feu Duty was abolished in the 1970's carried on righ into the post ''Beatles 'era in Scotland.
P.S-The English phrase ''Scot Free'' has nothing to do with Scotland-''A Scot ''was a an English feudal tax but today ''Getting off Scot free ..'' is used in everyday English to denote someone escaping punishment totally after doing something wrong.
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Old March 9th, 2014, 07:40 PM   #7
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Interesting thread.
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Old March 10th, 2014, 11:24 AM   #8

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Do the English have anything like the American National Guard today?
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Old March 10th, 2014, 05:44 PM   #9
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Questor since 1908 when it was established by the Liberal government of Great Britain of 1906-10 Britain's equivalent of the US national guard has been the Territorial Army who like National Guardsmen were recruited locally from each district as part time soldiers who received an annual cash bounty in exchange for a commitment to answer their country's call to serve as Regular soldiers in time of war and national emergency.
in the 1914-18 and 1939-45 wars hese Territorail Army men served in all major war theatres with heavy losses..
Just as in the USA local ational uard outfits are based in a National Guard Armory every British district has or use to have it's T.A. Army drill hall where the part time TA soldiers would practice their part time military skills.
Also like Americasn National Guard Armories which are used for professional and amateur boxing shows British TA halls are often used for dances,boxing shows and other social activities.
In both World Wars the Territorial Army soldiers were known as ' the'Terriers''
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Old March 12th, 2014, 01:02 PM   #10
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Is British territorial army really the same though, as national guard of US?

What about US reserve forces? Army reserves etc... how does it relate to national guard?
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