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Old March 30th, 2014, 12:10 PM   #51

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If we're talking nicknames.....

Again, alphabet soup. The USN uses short short letter combinations for broad ship types. So battleships are (were) BBs, destroyers were DDs, heavy cruisers were CAs. Carriers became CVs with subtypes being further subdivided. WWII saw the introduction of escort carriers (the RN called them auxilliary carriers) with the designation CVE. They were slow, unarmored and small by comparison-but they served a vital role, particularly in supporting seaborne invasions and ASW. In the best of naval traditions, the crews came up with their own version of just what CVE stood for-Combustible, Vulnerable, and Expendable.
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Old March 30th, 2014, 12:11 PM   #52

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The affinity with Greek mythology can also extend to Neptune being a symbol of the Royal Navy.
And the trident carried by Britannia.

Superstitious bunch, sailors - Sailors and Fishermans Superstitions | Old Salt BlogOld Salt Blog

I picked up a few of these from my uncle who was in the merchant navy.

Last edited by Sicknero; March 30th, 2014 at 12:14 PM.
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Old March 30th, 2014, 12:12 PM   #53

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Originally Posted by Mangekyou View Post
That's interesting Diddy. How superstitious were American sailors?

There is an urban myth associated with the superstitions of the RN, about the bad luck of sailing on a Friday, especially Friday 13th. To allay this a ship was commissioned called the HMS Friday, which sailed on Friday the 13th, and was never heard from again.
From the little bit I know, sailors of the USN are more superstitious than most. IIRC, there were entire operations delayed rather than start on Friday the 13th.
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Old March 30th, 2014, 12:20 PM   #54

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Originally Posted by Sicknero View Post
And the trident carried by Britannia.

Superstitious bunch, sailors - Sailors and Fishermans Superstitions | Old Salt BlogOld Salt Blog

I picked up a few of these from my uncle who was in the merchant navy.
I used to work with someone who was in the merchant navy. They are a bundle of stories.

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Originally Posted by diddyriddick View Post
From the little bit I know, sailors of the USN are more superstitious than most. IIRC, there were entire operations delayed rather than start on Friday the 13th.
Hmm. I know of an event which is like a rites of passage involving the line crossing of the equator. I don't know if they still practice this now though.
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Old March 30th, 2014, 12:34 PM   #55

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I used to work with someone who was in the merchant navy. They are a bundle of stories.
I never got rid of the habit of breaking a hole in the bottom of an eggshell before binning it And never stirring tea with a knife.

Quote:
Hmm. I know of an event which is like a rites of passage involving the line crossing of the equator. I don't know if they still practice this now though.
HMS Hood 1922 - CROSSING THE LINE aka CROSSING THE EQUATOR - HMS HOOD - British Pathé

I know they used to make a point of it still for some people on board, e.g. royals and sea cadets, I wonder if they still do anything similar. I wouldn't be surprised, traditions and all that.
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Old March 30th, 2014, 12:42 PM   #56

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Originally Posted by Mangekyou View Post
It is quite humble isn't it. The affinity with Greek mythology can also extend to Neptune being a symbol of the Royal Navy.
I believe it dates back to the neoclassical times of the 17/18thC where their Lordships at the Admiralty would choose names from classical works, the French did the same with their ships too. Nelson's first frigate was Agamemnon.


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I have one better.

The US Navy habitually names positions with acronyms of the shortened versions of their job titles. So Comander in Chief, Pacific Fleet becomes CinCPac-pronounced Sink-pack. All pretty mundane until we remember that there was once a job title in the USN called CinCUS.....

Hmmmm....

Pearl Harbour wasn't it? Bit of an unfortunate acronym.

I saw a painting signed by Mountbatten the other day, nothing to do with the thread but cool to see a famous sailor's signature.

Last edited by Earl_of_Rochester; March 30th, 2014 at 12:49 PM.
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Old March 30th, 2014, 12:58 PM   #57

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I just discovered that the Irish navy has a ship named like my mother
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Old March 30th, 2014, 01:33 PM   #58

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I just discovered that the Irish navy has a ship named like my mother
The RN has one named after my ex-Mother-in-law.....HMS Battleaxe.
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Old March 30th, 2014, 01:35 PM   #59

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I've always enjoyed the Queen Anne's Revenge, the one time flagship of Blackbeard.
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Old March 30th, 2014, 02:00 PM   #60

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Scharnhorst and Gneisenau together sound almost poetic to me.
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