Historum - History Forums  

Go Back   Historum - History Forums > Themes in History > War and Military History
Register Forums Blogs Social Groups Mark Forums Read

War and Military History War and Military History Forum - Warfare, Tactics, and Military Technology over the centuries


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old September 18th, 2014, 07:31 PM   #11
Historian
 
Joined: Oct 2012
Posts: 8,545

Quote:
Originally Posted by Belloc View Post
I thought the Marines did. Even the SS runes are used by some Marine units.
The SS rune has, for some time, been used unofficially by many scout snipers units, always portrayed as standing for 'scout sniper', not 'schutzstaffel'. I don't think it's an admiration of German military prowess like the OP discusses, I think it's more that it looks cool, offends overly sensitive people, and, obviously, 'ss' is the initials for 'scout sniper', so it just works.
constantine is offline  
Remove Ads
Old September 18th, 2014, 07:33 PM   #12
Suspended indefinitely
 
Joined: Mar 2013
From: Texas, USA
Posts: 3,909

Quote:
Originally Posted by Belloc View Post
I thought the Marines did. Even the SS runes are used by some Marine units.
The SS runes were chosen by Scout Snipers because they're cool looking, edgy and scary. The USMC Scout Sniper program has its roots in the British system.
attila006 is offline  
Old September 18th, 2014, 08:43 PM   #13

Panthera tigris altaica's Avatar
Funyuns
 
Joined: Aug 2011
From: Texas
Posts: 7,050
Blog Entries: 3

Quote:
Originally Posted by attila006 View Post

The USMC worships itself, they don't care a fig for the Germans.
Why does that make me chuckle? I can see the British influence still exists from the USMC founding and the influence of French pride as expressed in the Esprit de corps, but nothing Germanic aside from the already mentioned scout snipers incorporating the SS runic for their initials.
Panthera tigris altaica is offline  
Old September 18th, 2014, 08:50 PM   #14

Panthera tigris altaica's Avatar
Funyuns
 
Joined: Aug 2011
From: Texas
Posts: 7,050
Blog Entries: 3

Quote:
Originally Posted by Belloc View Post
Although one thing to keep in mind here though is that the US army has a long history of idolizing the Prussian/German military. This dates to the time of the Franco-Prussian War.
Actually,the Prussian influence on the US army goes back further to the revolutionary war with the continental army being influenced by Prussian born military officer General Friedrich von Steuben.
Panthera tigris altaica is offline  
Old September 18th, 2014, 08:53 PM   #15

Belloc's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Mar 2010
From: USA
Posts: 5,418

Quote:
Originally Posted by Panthera tigris altaica View Post
Actually,the Prussian influence on the US army goes back further to the revolutionary war with the continental army being influenced by Prussian born military officer General Friedrich von Steuben.
Touche, although I don't think Prussian influence remained important on American military doctrine after the Revolution right?
Belloc is offline  
Old September 18th, 2014, 09:04 PM   #16

Panthera tigris altaica's Avatar
Funyuns
 
Joined: Aug 2011
From: Texas
Posts: 7,050
Blog Entries: 3

Quote:
Originally Posted by Belloc View Post
Touche, although I don't think Prussian influence remained important on American military doctrine after the Revolution right?

Von Steuben's manual "Regulations for the Order and Discipline of the Troops of the United States" was the standard drill manual until about 1812.
Panthera tigris altaica is offline  
Old September 18th, 2014, 10:27 PM   #17

Ichon's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Mar 2013
From: .
Posts: 3,088

German infiltration or Storm troopers manual were standard reading material for infantry officers into the 80s I believe but U.S. has enough native experience in different missions and the battlefield has evolved in some ways that are important since WWII so I don't think current U.S. forces pay much homage to German doctrines outside of historical notices and a very few training regimes recommended but heavily modified.
Ichon is online now  
Old September 19th, 2014, 03:43 AM   #18

xander.XVII's Avatar
Alalai!
 
Joined: Nov 2009
From: Outer world
Posts: 3,719

How were viewed Japanese soldiers/Armed forces by American Armed Forces?
xander.XVII is offline  
Old September 19th, 2014, 05:51 AM   #19

RoyalHill1987's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Sep 2008
From: Halicarnassus, 353BC
Posts: 1,855

Quote:
Originally Posted by xander.XVII View Post
How were viewed Japanese soldiers/Armed forces by American Armed Forces?
They were seen as sub-human vermin that needed to be exterminated. American soldiers often kept heads of dead Japanese troops as trophies.
RoyalHill1987 is offline  
Old September 19th, 2014, 07:50 AM   #20
Suspended indefinitely
 
Joined: Mar 2013
From: Texas, USA
Posts: 3,909

Quote:
Originally Posted by RoyalHill1987 View Post
They were seen as sub-human vermin that needed to be exterminated. American soldiers often kept heads of dead Japanese troops as trophies.
That was the nature of the war, especially a hard fought war. While bodies might have been desecrated by some, many Marines, including the officer corps, respected the Japanese as warriors. While antiquated in the attack, they were tenacious in the defense, and were outstanding in infiltration tactics. Their abilities as night fighters was legendary too. A lot of the present day USMC tactics are based off of fighting them.

The current squad/fireteam organization used by the US Army, the British, and I believe the Germans too, and most other western nations, is based off lessons learned by the USMC fighting the Japanese (as well as observing the Chinese). During WWII, most section/squads were broken down into assault/support teams. After, they copied the USMC method and broke their squad/sections into two or three equal/interchangeable teams, each with its own squad automatic weapon.
attila006 is offline  
Reply

  Historum > Themes in History > War and Military History

Tags
complex, idolize, kasserine, military, wehrmacht



Search tags for this page
Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Complex non-literate societies unity General History 16 November 8th, 2013 03:48 AM
Temple Complex of Tarxien Brisieis Ancient History 9 August 20th, 2012 02:31 AM
Complex Assassinations In History bbooze General History 10 June 15th, 2012 10:01 AM
Military-Industrial Complex rehabnonono American History 35 May 31st, 2010 12:30 PM

Copyright © 2006-2013 Historum. All rights reserved.