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Old December 31st, 2009, 01:44 PM   #51
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Re: Things Nautical - Naval Vignettes


Funny- your link says she was built in 1863
On the actual ship the plaque says 1861.

When you go down into her, you hear this popping noise, like ghosts snapping their fingers...
But that is the barnacles or something, on the hull--- it just resonates thru the thin iron.

We also have the original yacht America- the one the cup is named for- and it takes folks out on whale watching excursions all winter.

My Grandfather was the Engineer on the Hornet in WWII- my dad served in the merchant marine during the war.

And when I lived in Chicago, the science and industry museum had the captured German Uboat U-505 mounted on a plinth outside the museum- holes cut thru the hull allowed you to enter the boat aft and exit fore on a tour.
Click the image to open in full size.

but recently they moved it into its own building.

Click the image to open in full size.
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Old January 1st, 2010, 05:44 AM   #52

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Re: Things Nautical - Naval Vignettes


German Uboat U-505
Now that is neat, almost worth a trip to Chicago to see it!
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Old January 2nd, 2010, 01:01 PM   #53
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Re: Things Nautical - Naval Vignettes


back when I toured the sub... 25 years ago, they had it set up exactly the way everything was when they captured it...
cigarettes out on tables, pots on the stove in the galley...

Like a time capsule of what was going on in the sub the moment it was depth charged to the surface.
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Old January 7th, 2010, 05:27 AM   #54

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Re: Things Nautical - Naval Vignettes


Manganese Nodules, mining, ruse

The Soviet GOLF II Class strategic ballistic missile submarines K-129 sunk in deep water in the Pacific Ocean floor in the summer of 1974. The CIA wanted to recover as much of the sub as possible to study, but knew the Soviets would block a brazen attempt, so in Project Jennifer they embarked on a ruse to raise portions of the sub, enlisting Howard Hughes as their proxy. The Glomar Explorer, with a massive lifting crane, was built and a cover story propagated that Huges hoped to use Glomar to harvest manganese nodules from the ocean floor for profit. The story caught on and others investigated the idea of harvesting the nodules for profit.

The Glomar did clandestinely raise part of the sub from the ocean floor.

The whole interestign story here.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USNS_Gl...orer_(T-AG-193)
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Old January 15th, 2010, 04:28 PM   #55

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Re: Things Nautical - Naval Vignettes


Sable Island.

Sable Island is a narrow crescent-shaped sandbar with a surface area of about 34 km˛. Despite being nearly 42 km long, it is no more than 1.5 km across at its widest point. It emerges from vast shoals and shallows on the continental shelf which, in tandem with the area's frequent fog and sudden strong storms including hurricanes and nor'easters, have caused over 350 recorded shipwrecks. It is often referred to as the Graveyard of the Atlantic, as it sits astride the great circle route from North America's east coast to Europe. The nearest landfall is 160 kilometres to the northwest near Canso, Nova Scotia.
Sable Island was named after its sandsable is French for "sand". It is covered with grass and other low-growing vegetation. In 1901, the federal government planted over 80,000 trees on the island in an attempt to stabilize the soil; all died. Sable Island is believed to have formed from large quantities of sand and gravel deposited on the continental shelf near the end of the last ice age. The island is continually changing its shape with the effects of strong winds and violent ocean storms. The island has several freshwater ponds on the south side between the station and west light and a brackish lake named Lake Wallace near its centre.

The island is home to over 300 free-roaming feral horses which are protected by law from human interference.

http://en.wikivisual.com/images/5/52/Sable_island.jpg
Sable_Island Sable_Island
Click the image to open in full size.

Click the image to open in full size.
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Old January 23rd, 2010, 03:44 PM   #56

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Re: Things Nautical - Naval Vignettes


Alfred Thayer Mahan

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http://c250.columbia.edu/c250_celebr...yer_mahan.html
Alfred Thayer Mahan (September 27, 1840 – December 1, 1914) was a United States Navyflag officer, geostrategist, and educator. His ideas on the importance of sea power influenced navies around the world, and helped prompt naval buildups before World War I. Several ships were named USS Mahan, including the lead vessel of a class of destroyers. His research into naval history led to his most important work, The Influence of Sea Power Upon History, 1660-1783 (1890). His Life of Nelson is also widely known and quoted.
Despite his professed success in the Navy, his skills in actual command of a ship were not exemplary, and a number of vessels under his command were involved in collisions, with both moving and stationary objects. He had an affection for old square-rigged vessels, and did not like smoky, noisy steamships of his time; he tried to avoid active sea duty. On the other hand, the books he wrote ashore made him arguably the most influential naval historian of the period. In pointing out how unlikely his ascent was Kyle Whitney compared his chances of achieving prominence in the navy to that of "a cheerleader becoming president".

Appearing at a time when Japan and the nations of Europe were engaged in a fiercely competitive arms race, Mahan’s work had a singularly profound influence on politics worldwide. In the United States, Mahan’s theories found a particularly receptive audience in Presidents William McKinley and Theodore Roosevelt: His work bolstered the case for rapid expansion and reconfiguration of the U.S. Navy, which replaced small cruisers with massive battleships and underwent a concomitant change in tactics; continued expansion overseas (to the Philippines, Hawaii and other Pacific islands, and the Caribbean), which allowed the creation bases at which U.S. ships could refuel and protect commerce; and even the construction of the Panama Canal, which facilitated the movement of fleets and freight. Mahan’s work influenced strategists in other countries as well, leading to naval buildups in England, Germany, and Japan in particular. Although Mahan saw military might as a means for avoiding war, the global growth inspired by his theories very clearly set the stage for World War I.


IFrom my reading, he was a favortie of Wilhelm II and fostered the build up of German Navy prior to WWI. Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany “devoured” the work, as he later recalled, and ordered a copy to be placed in every wardroom of every ship in the German fleet. Further to the east, the tsar of Russia read Mahan’s work and sent copies to every admiral and captain in his Imperial Navy. http://whiskeyandgunpowder.com/alfre...-thayer-mahan/



Alfred_Thayer_Mahan Alfred_Thayer_Mahan

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