125 Years of Women's Suffrage

Oct 2012
339
#11
I think It's pretty clear, suffrage doesn't guarantee you political freedom. I can put you examples like Syria, Morocco, or even examples of supossed "advanced" countries like Germany or Sweden (countries with what magistrate Leibholz called "Parties' state", which abolished representation of the districts, and transformed some political parties into institutions of the state).
Ok, I get your point about Syria or Morocco, but you don`t mean that those countries would have more freedom without suffrage? I also cannot understand what your criticism of Swedish or German electroral system has to do with general suffrage?
I mean that offcourse general suffrage is not the final solution to all political and social problems, but it is still a huge leap fowards, don`t you think?
 
Apr 2018
42
West
#12
Ok, I get your point about Syria or Morocco, but you don`t mean that those countries would have more freedom without suffrage? I also cannot understand what your criticism of Swedish or German electroral system has to do with general suffrage?
I mean that offcourse general suffrage is not the final solution to all political and social problems, but it is still a huge leap fowards, don`t you think?
I don't think it's a leap forward if its use isn't for a real political-freedom system. Plato considered the best form of government was the monarchy of a king-philosopher, like Marcus Aurelius.
 
Oct 2012
339
#13
I don't think it's a leap forward if its use isn't for a real political-freedom system. Plato considered the best form of government was the monarchy of a king-philosopher, like Marcus Aurelius.
Plato and real political-freedom have nothing to do with each other. "The republic" is not an utopia but a dystopia.
 
Sep 2018
27
Edmond, Ok USA
#14
Don't overconsider suffrage as the maximum glory of Human progress. Suffrage doesn't give much freedom and options in a lot of countries.
Good point. However, it is still a strong symbol of freedom when you DON'T have it. When you have the ability to vote, it seems less signficiant.
 
Likes: Entreri
Dec 2011
1,221
#15
Good point. However, it is still a strong symbol of freedom when you DON'T have it. When you have the ability to vote, it seems less signficiant.
I was just about to write this, too. Allow me to add that, if nothing else, it also was and sometimes still is, at the very least, a symbol for the equality of women and men and a vital source of confidence for every woman willing to break out of social structures directly or indirectly keeping women down.
 
Likes: Congo
Sep 2018
27
Edmond, Ok USA
#16
I was just about to write this, too. Allow me to add that, if nothing else, it also was and sometimes still is, at the very least, a symbol for the equality of women and men and a vital source of confidence for every woman willing to break out of social structures directly or indirectly keeping women down.
And I believe it has changed history. I don't think John F. Kennedy would have been elected. Nor Bill Clinton. When you have the ability to change the leadership in the most powerful country in the world, it may not be progress, but change is made. A nation may alter from an intended path without the vote of the woman.
 

deaf tuner

Ad Honoris
Oct 2013
12,346
Europix
#17
While they could vote, they were unable to run until 1907, I think (Finland started that)
An oddity: Lucie Dejardin is the first Belgian woman elected (in 1929 - although there was already in 1921 the senator Marie Janson - she wasn't elected but nominated by it's party).

The women gained the right to vote in ... 1948.
 
May 2015
762
Wellington, New Zealand
#19
In itself, that's probably quite right, but what you are forgetting is that women have the ability to network widely in areas which affect them (and men too ;-)). Using Maori women as an example if you look at the link shown in the Māori Parliament – Te Kotahitanga 1867 you will see a picture (published in the London Illustrated Times) of maori women included in Te Kotahitanga debates. This inclusion, even in an informal debate led to the formation of a number of groups interested in improving health, education and other aspects in society right up to the present day. As a further example ... Dame Whina Cooper.

Whina Cooper, of Te Rārawa, was born in northern Hokianga in 1895. She took part in local affairs and by the 1930s had become a leader of the northern Hokianga people.
In 1932 she played an active role, with Āpirana Ngata, in setting up Māori land development schemes in the region. Eleven schemes (comprising 98,000 acres, or 40,000 hectares) were set up in the Hokianga district, and Whina supervised several. The schemes made rapid progress, although several later proved uneconomic.
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Haere ra e te kuia rongonui o te motu. Haere ki Hawaiiki Nui, ki Hawaiiki Roa, ki Hawaiiki Pamamao. E noho mokemoke ana matou i raro i te kapua pouri. Haere, e kui, haere, haere, haere.
[Translation] Farewell you grand old lady whose feats are known throughout this land. Travel well on your journey to the place of your ancestors - to Hawaiiki the huge, Hawaiiki the long, Hawaiiki the far distant. We are bereft by you passing which has left us cloaked in a cloud of sadness. Farewell, grand lady, farewell.
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As far as European (Pakeha) women in NZ that changes came at the end of the colonisation period 1907, and Boer War and WWI and the social problems that occurred following.
 

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