1835 slave revolt lead by Muslims, brazil

Port

Ad Honorem
Feb 2013
2,086
portland maine
#1
From the book, Empire of Necessity by Greg Grandin, I read how a good per cent of slaves that came from the Bight of Benin, (modern-day Benin, Togo, and Nigeria). Slaves from the tribes of The Yoruba, Nupe, Wolof and Mandinke although speaking different languages being a large proportion being Muslim all had Arabic in common. This commonality allowed them to plan the slave revolt of 1835 in Bahia, Brazil. Brazil became independent in 1822 but maintained its slave economy. The revolt lead by Muslim leaders had written plans, coordinated through the mosques and over 1 thousand Africans took up arms, mostly sword against brazil’s army. The revolt ended with 100 Africans killed and 14 Brazilians. Although the revolt failed it did bring about these responses: The Brazilian government passed laws that led to a mass deportation of Africans back to Africa. One of the original goals of the Bahia Revolt was to be returned to Africa, the Bahia Revolt spurred the anti-slavery movement throughout Brazil. Although slavery continued to exist in Brazil until 1888. I knew nothing about this event.
 
Jun 2012
2,970
Brazil
#2
From the book, Empire of Necessity by Greg Grandin, I read how a good per cent of slaves that came from the Bight of Benin, (modern-day Benin, Togo, and Nigeria). Slaves from the tribes of The Yoruba, Nupe, Wolof and Mandinke although speaking different languages being a large proportion being Muslim all had Arabic in common. This commonality allowed them to plan the slave revolt of 1835 in Bahia, Brazil. Brazil became independent in 1822 but maintained its slave economy. The revolt lead by Muslim leaders had written plans, coordinated through the mosques and over 1 thousand Africans took up arms, mostly sword against brazil’s army. The revolt ended with 100 Africans killed and 14 Brazilians. Although the revolt failed it did bring about these responses: The Brazilian government passed laws that led to a mass deportation of Africans back to Africa. One of the original goals of the Bahia Revolt was to be returned to Africa, the Bahia Revolt spurred the anti-slavery movement throughout Brazil. Although slavery continued to exist in Brazil until 1888. I knew nothing about this event.
The historian Joâo José Reis says that in the rebel called in Brazil Malês
wore amulets papers with the writings passages from Quran in their clothes
expulsion to africa, was given to free blacks, it was suspected to be part of the movement but the goverment dont had evidence of his involvement
now the slaves who participated in the movement receive death sentences or lashes 600-1200 those who survived were sent to the sugar plantations
 
Jul 2017
335
Argentina
#3
Hey Port.
I’ve just googled it after finding this thread of yours.
I’m surprised by two things in this story.
First of all, it looks more like a religious fight than a class fight. The comparison points to the “quilombos”, that allowed almost every one in. Any afrincan born or any crioulo, or even the natives could join the quilombos. May be this “Revolta dos Malês” could have moved in that direction if it had succeeded and had time.
In second, the level of organization, which went far beyond just a revenge or an attempt just to get freedom or “tickets” to go back to Africa. They had plans to establish a government. It looks very much like Cuban revolution.

Hey Tayrusiano.
O que você acha?
 
Oct 2015
5,222
Matosinhos Portugal
#4
Hey Port.
I’ve just googled it after finding this thread of yours.
I’m surprised by two things in this story.
First of all, it looks more like a religious fight than a class fight. The comparison points to the “quilombos”, that allowed almost every one in. Any afrincan born or any crioulo, or even the natives could join the quilombos. May be this “Revolta dos Malês” could have moved in that direction if it had succeeded and had time.
In second, the level of organization, which went far beyond just a revenge or an attempt just to get freedom or “tickets” to go back to Africa. They had plans to establish a government. It looks very much like Cuban revolution.

Hey Tayrusiano.
O que você acha?

_______________________________________________________

Greg Grandin. Born: September 13, 1962 (54 years old), Brooklyn, New York, USA

I thought that this writer was from the time of the year 1800. After all it is from the past century as I am. Is one more who wants to sell stories barely told in his books.
It is very rare to see a writer born yesterday or born today, when they write stories about the history of portugal brazil angola etc. Who give concrete evidence.
Because of the story that's barely told, a lot of history is full of lies
How full of myths too? Writers and sellers of history books portugal and brazil have many as everyone.
My opinion, come more.
....

opiniões são opiniões venha mais,respeita a minha para eu poder respeitar a tua abraço.
 
Dec 2015
3,699
USA
#7
Also consider the time period...around 1835 the ideals of the French Revolution were still being felt worldwide. I strongly suspect the slave revolt included Catholics assisting the revolt.... and the Muslims involved were in part influenced by the ideals of the French and Napoleon like so many of history.
 
Oct 2010
289
Paomia, Corsica
#8
Also consider the time period...around 1835 the ideals of the French Revolution were still being felt worldwide. I strongly suspect the slave revolt included Catholics assisting the revolt.... and the Muslims involved were in part influenced by the ideals of the French and Napoleon like so many of history.
You're reaching a bit far. I find it unlikely that people living in the depth of Africa and then carried over to the Americas could be influenced by ideas developed in Europe. How would they have been exposed to it? In what language if nothing else? More importantly even, why would they care about ideas with no or little bearing on their own conditions?

In the Haitian case, for instance, the slave population (part of it at least) had been deeply penetrated by the debates of the time, but these guys had been around for decades, many if not most were native-born.

It would be a massive stretch for the Revolutionary ideals to be mingled there, specially because Brazil had not been involved in the Bolivarian Wars. I think it is likely, considering the situation in West Africa at the time, that the local understanding of Jihad was the driving ideology of the rebels
 
Jun 2012
2,970
Brazil
#9
You're reaching a bit far. I find it unlikely that people living in the depth of Africa and then carried over to the Americas could be influenced by ideas developed in Europe. How would they have been exposed to it? In what language if nothing else? More importantly even, why would they care about ideas with no or little bearing on their own conditions?

In the Haitian case, for instance, the slave population (part of it at least) had been deeply penetrated by the debates of the time, but these guys had been around for decades, many if not most were native-born.

It would be a massive stretch for the Revolutionary ideals to be mingled there, specially because Brazil had not been involved in the Bolivarian Wars. I think it is likely, considering the situation in West Africa at the time, that the local understanding of Jihad was the driving ideology of the rebels
I doubt the rebels had any french revolutionary influence but
French revolutionary ideals existed in Brazil since Conspiracy of Suassuna in 1796, now if Bolivarian wars is the independence moviments in Viceroyalty of New Granada by Simon Bolivar, it was impossible to Brazil be part, to start it was a Portuguese colony, with no relations with Spanish America, besides border clashes, Brazil independence had a more local interests, it started after the Porto Revolution where the Portuguese Cortes decided to made Brazilian provinces subordinated to Portuguese total control again, and cut Brasilian rights that Dom John had created when he moved the Court to Brazil.
 

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