1851, space aliens take over USA

Jul 2017
421
Memphis
Suppose space aliens take over the USA in 1851? They tell all the slaves each has two choices. If they complain about them they'll be sorry.

One, they can be freed but sent to Africa in or near Liberia, and never allowed back.

Two, the can remain as they are.

What do you think most slaves would choose? What would you choose?
 
Apr 2017
1,631
U.S.A.
This is a bizarre premise but I would imagine it would depend on what the aliens were like. Are they humanoid or something else?
 
Jul 2017
421
Memphis
This is a bizarre premise but I would imagine it would depend on what the aliens were like. Are they humanoid or something else?
Ok, I'll stipulate the men look like the sexiest human male models of 2018, the females like the sexiest female models.
 
Jul 2016
48
Tegelen
Suppose space aliens take over the USA in 1851? They tell all the slaves each has two choices. If they complain about them they'll be sorry.

One, they can be freed but sent to Africa in or near Liberia, and never allowed back.

Two, the can remain as they are.

What do you think most slaves would choose? What would you choose?
Would the white population not be considered slave as well, they are now dominated by a alien overlords.
 

stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
3,522
Las Vegas, NV USA
Forget space aliens. President Millard Fillmore gave the slaves two choices: stay where you are or go north. If you go north you will arrested and returned to your master (who likely will not be too happy with you.) Do you think Fillmore would pay for transport to Africa? Getting to Canada would be the best they could hope for. I would hope real space aliens would be kinder than Millard Fillmore.
 

Chlodio

Forum Staff
Aug 2016
4,471
Dispargum
The OP fails to consider the opinions of the slave owners which would be the largest political obstacle for aliens or Fillmore to overcome. Repatriation to Africa was considered at the time. It failed to gain enough political support. During the war Lincoln proposed repatriation and Frederick Douglas rejected it. By then, freedom in America was within sight and that's not an option under consideration here.

I rather doubt that there would be any unanimity of opinion. Africa in 1851 would have been a strange place for an African American. Few Africans spoke English, there was little need for the skills that slaves had learned in America, etc. Many conveniences that slaves enjoyed in America might not be available in Africa such as wearing manufactured, store-bought clothing or working with modern tools. Some brave souls might decide that freedom is so valuable that life in Africa is worth it. Others might decide that life in America was worth the price of slavery. The most decisive factor was probably family and friends. What did they want to do? Some people will tolerate slavery if it means staying with family and friends. (Yes, I know slavery far too often broke up families and friendships but not every family and friendship was broken by a cruel master.)