30.5 m. long viking ship being buildt

Oct 2015
955
Norway
Last week I visited the building of a viking ship in Nordfjordeid, Norway. The ship is based on a ship called the Myklebust ship. The burned remains of the Myklebust ship around 830 AD found in a burial mound in Nordfjordeid. The dimentions could be seen by studying nails, coal and other remains. The people building the new copy are from along line of boat builders and have buildt viking ships before. However, this is 30.5 meters long (about 100 feet) and about 50% larger than the ships the ones seen at the viking ship museum in Oslo. The ship will need a crewof nearly a 100 men. I belive it will be among, if not the, biggest viking ship in the world when it's finished in 2019. But what was most striking about it wasn't the size, but the elegance and beauty of the ship.

The finished ship compared to the ships on display in Oslo:



The building of the ship in Nordfjordeid:






How the finished ship will look:



The guide told us some interesting things from research and the experience of the shipbuilders:
- Pine is a better buidlding material than oak for viking ships sine pine is lighter and more flexible.
- Stones should not be used as ballast because it will destroy the ship in rough seas. Sand in bags (perhaps made of skin) is better.


But I have a question: Viking chieftains were burried in their ships inside mounds. But why were soem ships burned and others not?




 
Nov 2015
757
Australia
Looks a bit too heavy to me. This would be heavy to row and maneuver. The guys rowing would find this a pain in a**e. Not that on the rare occasion unusually heavy and tall long-ships weren't built. They would be low on mobility, but the height would give them advantage in a static battle.
Huge prestige ships have always been built by the kings who could afford them. But in the long run they tend to be white elephants.
Could sail well in a stiff breeze and that is about all. Pray you get a stiff breeze, because you won't enjoy rowing it!
The other recreation "the Sea Stallion", probably got everything right for what a large Drakkar was. At 30 room, this puts it as a typical kings flagship.
The typical Norse boat was probably 15 to 20 room is Haldrada's time. A century later they got to 20 to 25 room.
Gotta watch that tonnage per oarsmen. Men are only human! They gotta fight at some point and you don't want them totally spent by rowing, before they get there!
 

Matthew Amt

Ad Honorem
Jan 2015
2,987
MD, USA
Well, it looks like a nice ship to me! Not at all over-large--the Gokstad and Osberg ships were hardly the maximum usable size. I expect the builders understand the pitfalls of simply scaling up a smaller vessel, and won't build a "white elephant".

From what I've heard of burial and grave evidence, ship burials may just be too scattered over time and place to get any solid idea of customs. Burials may have given way to burnings, or vice versa. There are plenty of ship-shaped graves that don't contain ships, of course. BUT there are probably whole books on the subject! Couldn't tell ya.

Good luck to the builders! Neat project, as always.

Matthew
 
Oct 2015
955
Norway
According to the law about the Leidang (sort of the viking conscription navy) this was a normal ship for the region. From what is now the border of Sweden to the furthest south (Lindesnes) Leidang ships had to be at least 15 pair of oars. From Lindesnes to Kristiansund (roughly) they had to be at a minimum as large as the Myklebust ship. In other words it was a normal longship along the North Sea. Remember that these ships were known for being sleek and light.
 
Oct 2015
955
Norway
If you want to talk about huge prestige ships, I could mention Ormen Lange (The Long Serpent). This was the "flag ship " of king Olav Trygvason and based on the number of oars mentioned in the sagas it was from 45-55 meters long. At 30,5 meters the Myklebust ship is more modest.
 
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Oct 2015
955
Norway
For those who are interested in viking ship reconstructions you may want to Google the Danish "Havhingsten" (Sea Stallion) and the still unfinished Norwegian "Draken Harald Hårfagre" (The Dragon Harald Fairhair). Havhingsten is the size of the Myklebust ship, while Dragen Harald Hårfagre is longer at 35 meters (115 feet).
 
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deaf tuner

Ad Honoris
Oct 2013
14,533
Europix
It's really impressive !

Question:

-"pair of pars", that would make 4 men per pair, I suppose ?

- is there a site on the reconstruction ? Or is there a paper on it ? I'm asking because re-enactment (this could be one, no?) is often clarifying obscure /unknown historical aspects.
 
Nov 2015
757
Australia
According to the law about the Leidang (sort of the viking conscription navy) this was a normal ship for the region. From what is now the border of Sweden to the furthest south (Lindesnes) Leidang ships had to be at least 15 pair of oars. From Lindesnes to Kristiansund (roughly) they had to be at a minimum as large as the Myklebust ship. In other words it was a normal longship along the North Sea. Remember that these ships were known for being sleek and light.
This sleek and light here. It was the Sea Stallion that succeeded in design.



At 97 feet long and 30 rooms, this equates it with the largest leidang boats. But draws a mere meter of water.
The hull and ballast are given as 15 tonnes. If we add a burthen of 10 to 12 tonnes then we are up to over 25 tonnes. This meaning the oarsman are pulling 400 kg each.

In the case of the Myklebust ship. How heavy is it going to be? How much water will it draw? How much does each oarsman have to pull in weight? This makes or breaks it.
Would this be a "normal" boat?
 
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