500 years of Mexican history

Mar 2015
811
Europe
#1
On 10th of February, 1519, Hernan Cortez sailed from Cuba with 11 ships.
He was at that point a rebel, having specifically been ordered to not sail, and sailing anyway.
On which day did Hernan Cortez receive the order to not sail?

On which day did Cortez´ fleet reach Mexico?
Cortez´ expedition finally reached Tenochtitlan on 8th of November, 1519, with about 400 men. Of 500...600 men Cortez sailed with (sources seem to vary) few had died till then, but a few tens had sailed back to Spain, and over a hundred had stayed in Veracruz.

How are Mexicans, in 2019, commemorating/celebrating 500th anniversaries of various events of Cortez´ expedition?
 
Oct 2014
1,215
California
#2
Maybe Google the question?
On or about May 5, 1535, Hernán Cortés (correct Spanish spelling of Cortez) reached the California shore at today's La Paz. He named the land (assumed to be an island) Santa Cruz. Pearls discovered there by the first European sailors to reach California (now called Baja California) in 1533 or 34, were the enticement. Within 5 years, the land would be called California.
 

betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
5,887
#3
There are some commemorations in Mexico. Although the elite is mostly Spanish, they tend to identify with the Aztec civilization, rather than glorifying its Spanish conquest.
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
4,886
Portugal
#4
There are some commemorations in Mexico. Although the elite is mostly Spanish, they tend to identify with the Aztec civilization, rather than glorifying its Spanish conquest.
I think that is an overgeneralization about the Aztecs, probably not depending only of the social classes, but also depending on the regions. I confess that when I was in Mexico, I saw much more identification with the Mayas than with the Aztecs, but I was in the state of Quintana Roo. But I was also criticised by my bad Spanish accent.

Nevertheless the Mexican folk music and the folk dances have a great influence of the Spanish, and those are popular, not only elitists. On the other hand, the concept of “malinchism” exists. And the songwriter and singer Gabino Palomares sings against it in good Spanish in his song "La maldición de Malinche". So it is a society of mergers and contrasts.
 

kandal

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
2,577
USA
#5
On 10th of February, 1519, Hernan Cortez sailed from Cuba with 11 ships.
He was at that point a rebel, having specifically been ordered to not sail, and sailing anyway.
On which day did Hernan Cortez receive the order to not sail?

On which day did Cortez´ fleet reach Mexico?
Cortez´ expedition finally reached Tenochtitlan on 8th of November, 1519, with about 400 men. Of 500...600 men Cortez sailed with (sources seem to vary) few had died till then, but a few tens had sailed back to Spain, and over a hundred had stayed in Veracruz.

How are Mexicans, in 2019, commemorating/celebrating 500th anniversaries of various events of Cortez´ expedition?
Nothing much is showing up on google search. May be Mexicans, not the Spanish ones, don't want to be reminded of how some 500 foreign men with a few horses conquered their civilization.
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
4,886
Portugal
#6
Nothing much is showing up on google search. May be Mexicans, not the Spanish ones, don't want to be reminded of how some 500 foreign men with a few horses conquered their civilization.
Mexico had more than one civilization. The Mexica and the Mayas were different civilizations, just to mention two.

And yet culturally Mexico is much closer to Spain than to any of the Pre-Columbian tribes, states and civilizations that inhabited today’s territory of Mexico. Besides we should recall that the conquest of Mexico by Cortés is a simplification. It opened the door it didn’t ended the process of conquest of the territory that today belongs to Mexico.

This OP question reminds me the commemoration of the 500 years of the arrival of Cabral to Brazil. In the joined commemorations the Portuguese history team wanted to name it “descoberta”/“discovery” and the Brazilian history team wanted to call it “achamento”/“finding”. If I recall correctly, at the end it had the two designations, one in Portugal, the other one in Brazil. A useless semantic discussion, in my opinion, since the word “discovery” needs to be put in context, from an Eurocentric perspective, and the word “finding” is mostly a synonymous.

About what we can find with google: Hernán Cortés, una herencia incómoda
 

kandal

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
2,577
USA
#7
^^ Maya was more Central American (Meso American), though it encompasses Yucatan. Mayan cultural centers like Copan and Tikal are outside Mexico. Pretty impressive places to see.
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
4,886
Portugal
#8
^^ Maya was more Central American (Meso American), though it encompasses Yucatan. Mayan cultural centers like Copan and Tikal are outside Mexico. Pretty impressive places to see.
Yes, but since I only visited North American Mayan places (in Mexico), such as Tulum and Chichén Itzá, and know a little more about those, I can’t talk that much about the ones in Central America that I didn't visit or read about so often.

On the other way Meso-America is often if not usually seen as in North America: “Mesoamerica is a historical region and cultural area in North America.” (Mesoamerica - Wikipedia). And both the Mexica and the Mayas are considered Meso-American.
 

betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
5,887
#10
He was at that point a rebel, having specifically been ordered to not sail, and sailing anyway.
He disobeyed orders from the colonial governor. That did not make him a rebel against the king or country. If he had failed and somehow also survived, he might have been in trouble. Things did not go by rules in the Americas as much as in Europe, even then.
 

Similar History Discussions