7 greatest wonders of africa?

Jun 2013
728
canada
Per country, fyi, I'll start, this is mostly opinion based though.

Somalia:

-Mogadishu waterfront
-13th century Arba Rucun mosque(great example of somali architecture)
-Taleex castle(somalia had quite the castle building tradition in the 18th and 19th century, although fortifications and citadels existed from the medieval period.
-twin medieval cities of merca and barawa
-Al-Uruba hotel(pre-eminence of Somali architecture, designed and built by somalis)
-Sheikh's tomb(can't remember his name)
-Old lighthouse of Zeila

honorary mentions: Mosque of islamic solidarity(funded by saudis but is really has the mogadishan influence, it fits the city like a well oiled glove).
National museum of somalia(contained a treasure trove on somali history before its destruction, including artifacts and historical written records(even one apparently on the ancient writing system of somalia.
Wadaade's wall(an ancient wall enclosure with somali writing on it, it must have been quite a site before its erosion).

I wonder, could Zeila have the oldest mosques in Africa? The prophet's companion's fled there(then under axumite control) it's possible they could've built a mosque.

Funny story about Zeila, in the 13th century, while under the control of the Adal kingdom, an Abyssinian bishop travelling nearby was captured and brought to the city. Refusing attempts to convert him to Islam, the enraged king had him circumcised. This may have prompted an invasion of the neighboring abyssinian empire. Historians think marco polo may have referenced somalia in his travels by speaking about this, instead of Yemen in Aden.
 
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Sep 2013
1
Sydney
Per country, fyi, I'll start, this is mostly opinion based though.

Somalia:

-Mogadishu waterfront
-13th century Arba Rucun mosque(great example of somali architecture)
-Taleex castle(somalia had quite the castle building tradition in the 18th and 19th century, although fortifications and citadels existed from the medieval period.
-twin medieval cities of merca and barawa
-Al-Uruba hotel(pre-eminence of Somali architecture, designed and built by somalis)
-Sheikh's tomb(can't remember his name)
-Old lighthouse of Zeila

honorary mentions: Mosque of islamic solidarity(funded by saudis but is really has the mogadishan influence, it fits the city like a well oiled glove).
National museum of somalia(contained a treasure trove on somali history before its destruction, including artifacts and historical written records(even one apparently on the ancient writing system of somalia.
Wadaade's wall(an ancient wall enclosure with somali writing on it, it must have been quite a site before its erosion).

I wonder, could Zeila have the oldest mosques in Africa? The prophet's companion's fled there(then under axumite control) it's possible they could've built a mosque.

Funny story about Zeila, in the 13th century, while under the control of the Adal kingdom, an Abyssinian bishop travelling nearby was captured and brought to the city. Refusing attempts to convert him to Islam, the enraged king had him circumcised. This may have prompted an invasion of the neighboring abyssinian empire. Historians think marco polo may have referenced somalia in his travels by speaking about this, instead of Yemen in Aden.
Ok. that was not the best move.

but do you have books about the samaales. i wrote somewhere they where called barber race, and where from barbera?


gl
 

antocya

Ad Honorem
May 2012
5,778
Iraq
I'm disappointed I didn't get a chance to visit the rock churches in Ethiopia. I did manage to see one in Addis, a bit outside of the city. It took about an hours walk into the hills. It wasn't very impressive though, it was bombed by the Italians and not in good condition and no longer in use.
 
Jul 2013
87
Canada
For Nigeria, how about the Walls of Benin City:

The Walls of Benin were a combination of ramparts and moats, called Iya in the local language, used as a defense of the historical Benin City, formerly of the now defunct Kingdom of Benin and now the capital of the present-day Edo State of Nigeria. It was considered the largest man-made structure lengthwise and was hailed as the largest earthwork in the world. With more recent work by Patrick Darling, it has been established as the largest man-made structure in the world, larger than Sungbo's Eredo. It enclosed 6,500 km² of community lands. Its length was over 16,000 km of earth boundaries. It was estimated that earliest construction began in 800 AD and continued into the mid-1400s.
The Benin Walls were ravaged by the British in 1897 during what has come to be called the Punitive expedition. Scattered pieces of the structure remain in Edo, with the vast majority of them being used by the locals for building purposes. Sadly, what remains of the wall itself continues to be torn down for real estate developments.[1][2]
The Walls of Benin City was the world's largest man-made structure.[3] Fred Pearce wrote in New Scientist:
"They extend for some 16,000 kilometres in all, in a mosaic of more than 500 interconnected settlement boundaries. They cover 6,500 square kilometres and were all dug by the Edo people. In all, they are four times longer than the Great Wall of China, and consumed a hundred times more material than the Great Pyramid of Cheops. They took an estimated 150 million hours of digging to construct, and are perhaps the largest single archaeological phenomenon on the planet.
[ame="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walls_of_Benin"]Walls of Benin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia[/ame]

Advantageously situated, the moats were dug in such a manner that earthen banks provided outer walls that complemented deep ditches.... The ramparts range in size from shallow traces to the immense 20-meter-high rampart (66 feet) around Benin City (Wesler 1998: 144). The Guinness Book of World Records describes the walls of Benin City as the world's second largest man-made structure after China's Great Wall), in terms of length, and the series of earthen ramparts as the most extensive earthwork in the world.


During the second half of the 15th century, Oba Ewuare the Great ordered a moat to be dug in the heart of the city. The earthworks served as a bastion and also afforded control of access to the capital which had nine gates that were shut at night.
Ancient Benin City


Reports are conflicting whether or not it's larger than the Great Wall of China. But nevertheless it's one of the largest man-made constructions in the world.

Nigeria is also home to other massive earthworks like Sungbo's Eredo:

a rampart or system of walls and ditches that is located to the south-west of the Yoruba town of Ijebu-Ode...

The Eredo served a defensive purpose when it was built in 800 - 1000 AD, a period of political confrontation and consolidation in the southern Nigerian rainforest. It was likely to have been inspired by the same process that led to the construction of similar walls and ditches throughout western Nigeria, including earthworks around Ile-Ife, Ilesa, and the Benin Iya...

Total length of fortifications is more than 160 kilometres (99 mi). Fortifications consist of a ditch with unusually smooth walls and bank in the inner side of ditch. The height difference between the bottom of the ditch and the upper rim of the bank on the inner side can reach 20 metres....[2]

As a construction project, it required more earth to be moved than the Great Pyramid of Giza.
Sungbo's Eredo - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
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