A Pre-hispanic Canary Islands history thread

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
6,145
Portugal
The Canary Islands is in my opinion one of the must puzzled and intriguing territories in the European Area, in historical matters. Many of theses puzzles weren’t yet resolved.

The islands were known since ancient times and were visited and revisited by Phoenicians/Carthaginians and quite possibly by Romans.

There is a large dark period (dark in terms of sources). Some vague Muslim sources state that landed in territories in the Atlantic Ocean can be linked with these Islands.

Then in the late medieval age we have the rediscovery of the islands, with Genoese, Aragonese, Mayorquin, Castilian and Portuguese interest in them.

And let us no forget that these Islands were inhabited since pre-historic times, by people generic known as Guanches.

Since the XIX century several theories, even some odd theories, seem to appear about the Guanches and their origins.

So, I would really would like to know, what this community as to say about these themes. The Guanches and their origins, and the discovery, rediscovey and conquest of the Islands.

Thank you all…
 

johnincornwall

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
7,865
Cornwall
I posted quite a detailed account a couple of years ago of the destruction of Ferdinand de Lugo's army in the Acentejo Gorge by the Northern Guanches, and the subsequent conquest a year later. We stayed on holiday only a few hundred meteres from the Gorge, which is still there, surrounded by buildings to the sides. The village is called La Matanza de Acentejo after the massacre. The next village, bordering it at the Gorge is called la Victoria, after the victory a year later.

I'll try and search for the thread if you want me to dredge it up - I'm not too sure what I would have called it. Maybe search things like Acentejo, Tenerife, Lugo, 1484, Guanches, Taino (?) etc etc

EDIT - the best theory I have read is that the Guanches had berber origins. And I'm not too sure about all those visitors you listed - I think history made a lot of assumptions.
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
6,145
Portugal
There's almost always a Canary Islands thread on the back burner here.
Sorry about that. I am new at the forum and didn’t found any.

I posted quite a detailed account a couple of years ago of the destruction of Ferdinand de Lugo's army in the Acentejo Gorge by the Northern Guanches, and the subsequent conquest a year later. We stayed on holiday only a few hundred meteres from the Gorge, which is still there, surrounded by buildings to the sides. The village is called La Matanza de Acentejo after the massacre. The next village, bordering it at the Gorge is called la Victoria, after the victory a year later.

I'll try and search for the thread if you want me to dredge it up - I'm not too sure what I would have called it. Maybe search things like Acentejo, Tenerife, Lugo, 1484, Guanches, Taino (?) etc etc

EDIT - the best theory I have read is that the Guanches had berber origins. And I'm not too sure about all those visitors you listed - I think history made a lot of assumptions.
Many years ago I was in Tenerife (Santa Cruz), unfortunately I was concentrated in other themes and I didn’t leave much the hotel.

And Thanks! Post here the link if you find it. I will also search for it.

And about the Guanches, the theory that convinced me more was also the one that made the connection with the Berbers. But I also have the idea that the Guanches are more a generic designation and that from island to island there were important differences and even different stages of civilization.

So… basically we can talk here 3 main themes:
1. The Guanches and their civilization(s);
2. The knowledge of the islands in the antiquity and in the Muslim period;
3. Their rediscovery and the consequent conquest.

Besides some generic references in Portuguese and Spanish history books, I have as my main reference: Historia de Las Islas Canarias - De la prehistoria al descubrimiento, by Demetrio Castro Alfin, published in 1983, Editora Nacional, col. Cultura y Sociedad. I didn't pick up this book for some time, but maybe almost 30 years later there are some new developments.

I will soon post here some of the Demetrio's perspectives (and eventually my opinion).