A pro-German Intermarium is created after Germany wins WWI

Dec 2011
4,894
Iowa USA
#21
Nothing. He died in 1934. However, my great grandmother was alive. Her birthplace in the 1940 Census is Poland.
Sometimes we have to account for the fact that @Futurist is a whole generation younger than our experience.

For what it is worth, I have a grandfather that possibly had gone AWOL from the Russian army to immigrate. It turns out that the naturalization people accepted SWITERZERLAND as his nation of origin. So... I understand how these records are more of a bureaucratic artifact than "actual" historic evidence. The chances that my grandfather ever saw Switzerland are very slim.
 

Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
6,171
US
#27
So, she was born in 1867, moved to the US at age 21 in 1888, and lived in the US for 63 years?
Almost. She came in 1889, but her husband came at the end of 1887. As you probably know, the man often came alone, established a job and residence, then sent for his wife - or, in this case, went back home, for his bride. They were married in 1889. Interestingly, the Census says my great grandfather was able to read and write, but my great grandmother could not. Also, he was naturalized, but she was not, although this happened before the amendment that gave women the right to vote. I imagine that would be one reason a person would wish to become a citizen: to vote.
 
Likes: Futurist

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,197
SoCal
#28
Almost. She came in 1889, but her husband came at the end of 1887. As you probably know, the man often came alone, established a job and residence, then sent for his wife - or, in this case, went back home, for his bride. They were married in 1889. Interestingly, the Census says my great grandfather was able to read and write, but my great grandmother could not. Also, he was naturalized, but she was not, although this happened before the amendment that gave women the right to vote. I imagine that would be one reason a person would wish to become a citizen: to vote.
I thought that you previously said that they got married in 1888; did you double-check and discover that 1889 is the correct year for their marriage?
 

Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
6,171
US
#29
I thought that you previously said that they got married in 1888; did you double-check and discover that 1889 is the correct year for their marriage?
Maybe I did a typo. I don't recall. I have had a copy of the document from the German authorities, which I secured from Gdansk, for over a year now. The marriage took place on the 25th of January 1889. The groom was a worker (Arbeiter). The witnesses: both farmers (Besitzer in German, which also means land owner). I assume my great grandfather was employed by them at one time. Interestingly, but not so surprisingly, both have German surnames.
 
Likes: Futurist

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,197
SoCal
#30
Maybe I did a typo. I don't recall. I have had a copy of the document from the German authorities, which I secured from Gdansk, for over a year now. The marriage took place on the 25th of January 1889. The groom was a worker (Arbeiter). The witnesses: both farmers (Besitzer in German, which also means land owner). I assume my great grandfather was employed by them at one time. Interestingly, but not so surprisingly, both have German surnames.
What is the bride's occupation?