A US map from the early 1940s that shows what a US equivalent of Operation Barbarossa would look like

Jul 2016
9,676
USA
#11
The Nazis would have been better served listening to Georg Thomas about this:

Georg Thomas - Wikipedia
Definitely. But how realistic would it be for the Germans to suddenly, for the first time, to make logistics the focal point of any operation?

The German military has never truly put much stock in the science of war, which includes logistics. Warfare to them was about art, and about the psychological aspect of will and drive. If they want to make something happen, they will find a way. Optimism and all that crap was more important that reality, because they believed that force of will defined reality. It wasn't just Hitler who believed that, it was all of them, it is old school Prussian cultural mindset. If Germany had done the sensible thing, Prussia would still be a tiny duchy that was loosely organized with or against a non-unified collection of Germanic principalities. That tiny state only took control of it all, becoming the strongest land power in Europe because they didn't do the sensible thing.

But eventually, that came back to bite them in the butt. They managed to largely dodge reality for centuries, but it caught up to them eventually.
 
Likes: Futurist

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
20,960
SoCal
#12
Definitely. But how realistic would it be for the Germans to suddenly, for the first time, to make logistics the focal point of any operation?

The German military has never truly put much stock in the science of war, which includes logistics. Warfare to them was about art, and about the psychological aspect of will and drive. If they want to make something happen, they will find a way. Optimism and all that crap was more important that reality, because they believed that force of will defined reality. It wasn't just Hitler who believed that, it was all of them, it is old school Prussian cultural mindset. If Germany had done the sensible thing, Prussia would still be a tiny duchy that was loosely organized with or against a non-unified collection of Germanic principalities. That tiny state only took control of it all, becoming the strongest land power in Europe because they didn't do the sensible thing.

But eventually, that came back to bite them in the butt. They managed to largely dodge reality for centuries, but it caught up to them eventually.
Good points. That said, though, I wonder if the failure of the Schlieffen Plan in 1914 might have been enough to get the German leadership to understand the importance of logistics.