Aboriginal people have lived in Australia for a minimum of 65,000 years

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specul8

Ad Honorem
Oct 2016
3,379
Australia
Here is, I think, a good summary for some 'back ground information' ;

The first migrations out of Africa

together with this
  • ( Updated 22/03/19 )
;

The spread of people to Australia

" The settlement of Australia is the first unequivocal evidence of a major sea crossing and rates as one of the greatest achievements of early humans "

and

" Recently published dates of 120,000 years ago for the site of Moyjil in Warrnambool, Victoria, offer intriguing possibilities of much earlier occupation (Proceedings of the Royal Society of Victoria, 2018). The site contains remains of shellfish, crabs and fish in what may be a ‘midden’, but definitive proof of human occupation is lacking and investigations are ongoing. "

In case anyone is wondering :

" Homo erectus remains have never been found in Australia. "
 
Mar 2019
1,805
Kansas
While I take your point that to arrive here, early modern humans obviously came from elsewhere, the implications for the "out of Africa" are real:
Funny story - during a studying some rock paintings about 15 years ago, there was an error made in the dating and a group of researchers released a paper that seemed to destroy the whole out of Africa concept. Eventually the error was isolated as a problem with how the samples for dating were collected and calm was restored lol
 

specul8

Ad Honorem
Oct 2016
3,379
Australia
I wanted to comment on what you wrote but remove the personal element - that is, I was thinking about the issue of forming an opinion first and seeking backup as opposed to searching out info to form an opinion .

When I started getting interested in all this, many years back , MY opinion of Aboriginals was very poor , as a child and youth I had been indoctrinated by very ill informed sources.

I mentioned this before , many Australians where not born 'Greenie' , or whatever, stuff like this can be challenging if we hold on to our indoctrinations .

Fortunately for me , I found it fascinating ( and I have fairly recently understood that I am a xenophile :) ) and , because of where I lived and 'explored' I found stuff, and realized stuff, started to read a bit more, ask questions, and I got really bad answers or ones that didnt make sense .

I think all of this, and the new info being revealed as we go on, is a challenge for Australians, as a whole, , and something a lot of us need to come to terms with .
 
Mar 2019
1,805
Kansas
I think all of this, and the new info being revealed as we go on, is a challenge for Australians, as a whole, , and something a lot of us need to come to terms with .
I think along with the new information you mention, a lot of Australians were genuinely shocked by the revelation and subsequent effects of the 'stolen generation' It was certainly something I never learned about in school, but I know my children did. For anyone interested in the topic outside of Australia I can strongly recommend the film 'Rabbit Proof Fence' to see what was done, why it was done and the ultimate effect it had on the people
 

Kookaburra Jack

Ad Honorem
May 2011
2,941
Rural Australia
Here is, I think, a good summary for some 'back ground information' ;

The first migrations out of Africa

together with this

The spread of people to Australia
Thanks. Interesting stuff. From that second article:


Stone tools
Stone tools in Australia, as in other parts of the world, changed and developed through time. Some early types, such as wasted blades, core tools, large flake scrapers and split pebble choppers continue to be made and used right up to today.

About 6000 years ago, new and specialised tools such as points, backed blades and thumbnail scrapers became common. Significant variation between the tool kits of different regions also appeared. Prototypes for this technology appeared earlier in Asia, suggesting this innovation was introduced into Australia.

The ground stone technique produces tools with a more durable and even edge, although not as sharp as a chipped tool. The oldest ground stone tools appear in Australia about 10,000 years before they appear in Europe, suggesting that early Australians were more technologically advanced in some of their tool manufacturing techniques than was traditionally thought.​

Looking further at this claim lead me to this:

https://www.smh.com.au/technology/cutting-edge-stone-age-technology-was-born-in-australia-20160509-gopunj.html

Cutting edge Stone Age technology was born in Australia

Wielding the axe, literally speaking, was an act first carried out in Australia according to archaeologists, who have discovered part of the world's oldest axe in a remote corner of the Kimberley.

The Stone Age find pre-dates the arrival of agriculture and is evidence that the first Aboriginal people were far more sophisticated with their tool-making and use than previously thought.

"We are re-writing history here," said Sydney University archaeologist Peter Hiscock. "We need to give the ancestors of Aboriginal people credit for being clever, adaptable and successful."

///

The world's previous oldest axe was discovered in Arnhem Land in 2010 and is about 34,000 to 35,000 years old. By comparison, the earliest ground-edge axes from Europe, west Asia and Africa are about 8500 years old.​

This is fascinating stuff.
 
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Nov 2011
1,051
The Bluff
Funny story - during a studying some rock paintings about 15 years ago, there was an error made in the dating and a group of researchers released a paper that seemed to destroy the whole out of Africa concept. Eventually the error was isolated as a problem with how the samples for dating were collected and calm was restored lol
Quite. Hence the "unless challenged". Though the paper is replete with clear methodological exposition so I'll be interested to see what academia makes of it though, presently, most seem favourable:

Reply to comments on Clarkson et al. (2017) ‘Human occupation of northern Australia by 65,000 years ago’

Breaking through the radiocarbon barrier: Madjedbebe and the new chronology for Aboriginal occupation of Australia.

Madjedbebe and genomic histories of Aboriginal Australia.
 

AlpinLuke

Forum Staff
Oct 2011
27,032
Italy, Lago Maggiore
I would introduce in the discussion the perspective that Australia can have hosted the most ancient [and isolated] culture / proto-civilization ever. The matter here is simple: Australian culture has[have] been substantially isolated for may be more than 45,000 years. there are not great clues about cultural exchanges in this very long period.

This, according to some scholars, would have the OALMUP model unsuitable to describe what has happened in that continent.

First of all, what's OALMUP? It's an acronym corresponding to the sequence of the periods describing the age of stone [Old World Oldowan , Acheulean , Levallois , Mousterian , Upper Palaeolithic]. It's a quite known model and it's not rarely used as system of reference [I myself, I tend to use it pondering the Australian prehistory].

I think that this work by Davidson can be useful to explain the point: Davidson, I. 2014 It's the thought that counts: unpacking the “package” of behaviour of the first people of Sahul and its adjacent islands. In M. Porr and R. Dennell (eds), East of Africa. Southern Asia, Australia and human origins, pp.243-256.
 
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