About intelligence and education

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,550
Florania
#1
I keep thinking of posting a thread about intelligence, and I think of these three in the Chinese language.
Intelligence Quotient (智商): It usually means the potential and ability to learn and apply learning; with some techniques, it can be enhanced; most of it is innate.
Wisdom (智慧): The life experience and the way to deal with lives and practical events.
Knowledge (知识): The hardcore facts and techniques.
Most people with college education (or degree holders) are at least "mildly gifted" by IQ.
The quote from good old George Bernard Shaw: A fool's brain digests philosophy into folly, science into superstition, arts into pedantry. Hence University education.

Should we focus on all three?
How should education be done?
 
Likes: specul8

Jax

Ad Honorem
Aug 2013
6,347
Seattle
#3
I'm in favor of free mandatory education up to the 12 grade with a form of track system to allow more gifted/motivated students into higher levels of instruction, away from the common herd.

I also support free 4 year college for those that wish it and then paid college for those that seek an education for a career.

Classes offered by Coursera and others is an interesting paradigm. https://www.coursera.org/
 
Jan 2018
1,609
China (Hong Kong SAR)
#4
To add, in Chinese, genius is translated to 天才, which is suggestive of "naturally gifted by the heavens" or equivalent.

@Jax
I agree mostly, though I'm in favor of free education for as long as the potential student is alive, even for the elderly.

Coursera is interesting, as are university curriculums, but they don't compare even the slightest to classical mathematics books as I've noticed, in the context of mathematics. Hence, at university levels, the most drastic amounts of self-study is encouraged.

Something about the romance of geniuses passing knowledge to geniuses is quite mysteriously uncommon among educational institutions.
 

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,550
Florania
#5
To add, in Chinese, genius is translated to 天才, which is suggestive of "naturally gifted by the heavens" or equivalent.

@Jax
I agree mostly, though I'm in favor of free education for as long as the potential student is alive, even for the elderly.

Coursera is interesting, as are university curriculums, but they don't compare even the slightest to classical mathematics books as I've noticed, in the context of mathematics. Hence, at university levels, the most drastic amounts of self-study is encouraged.

Something about the romance of geniuses passing knowledge to geniuses is quite mysteriously uncommon among educational institutions.
People are talented in different areas.
Brilliance in one area doesn't mean general aptitude.
For me, basic education must prepare the most essential skills and ethical values.
 
Likes: specul8

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
5,686
Portugal
#7
People are talented in different areas.
Brilliance in one area doesn't mean general aptitude.
For me, basic education must prepare the most essential skills and ethical values.
Agreed.

@VHS
Well of course, there are musical geniuses, for example, who might not be very good at maths.
I knew a genius at Mathematics, which was a disgrace in social skills.
 

Black Dog

Ad Honorem
Mar 2008
9,990
Damned England
#10
Will universities make fools smart or will fools make universities stupid.?
That's a puzzler! But if pushed, I'd say the later. The British university system used to be free. Of course, you had to prove that you were capable of further education in order to gain entry. Usually, this meant "A" Levels ("A" is for "Advanced", apparently) of a good enough grade, usually at least 4 of them. For those who missed the boat at school, there were numerous schemes to allow mature students the means to learn and attain the right standard.

However, this system was a privilege one had to earn. If you failed, tough. Therefore, standards had to be more rigorous and universities owned course failures nothing, either materially or morally.

But since Britain adopted a system where university now costs the student, the relationship between student and university has changed drastically. Essentially, the student is now a customer. He or she picks a university (although some do still demand the right entry qualifications), and many do so by pass rate. Universities now have to openly campaign to get new students and they have a vested interest in high pass rates. Plus, many courses now are "mickey mouse" popularist ones. I get regular emails etc from graduates trying to get a job or training, and I'm often shocked by how poor the literacy and grammar are in these.
 

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