Additional cases of a group losing its majority in a country as a result of immigration?

Apr 2018
979
Upland, Sweden
#51
I think that's more or less over. A lot of Yugoslavs used to move to Sweden in the previous decades, you should know at least one. ;) I think all the Somalis up thete and the things they're doing are putting people off to still go there. But I might have a false impression, I'm sure you can tell more about this as I don't follow the situation in Sweden.
Oh I do know one. :cool: He is a pretty cool dude that guy...

I'd wager 2-5% of my generation has some Yugoslav ancestry. So it's not at all uncommon.

You're somewhat right, although Poles have been the second largest group of migrants to Sweden since 2000... so not entirely right.

I could tell you more if you want to, I mean, feel free to PM me if you're interested in this somewhat dismal topic haha!
 
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Apr 2018
979
Upland, Sweden
#52
How far back do you want to go? I guess one can look at the migration patterns of humans to Europe over the last 48,000 years when the first Homo Sapiens out of Africa entering Europe drove the native European population known as Neanderthals to extinction. Somewhat of a reverse prehistoric colonialism in which dark skinned anatomically modern humans with better technology, presumably smarter than Neanderthals, out-competed the natives of Europe for resources. Since Neanderthals had been living in Europe for hundreds of thousands of years before the first Homo Sapiens arrived, Neanderthals had lighter skin and light colored hair and eyes, while the new arrivals from Africa which would later be called Cro Magnon had darker skin, taller and lankier. Of course some anthropologists have argued that the Neanderthals were already an endangered species even before the arrival of Homo Sapiens.


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Yeah, if you want to go somewhat closer in time I suppose you could speak of the proto-Indo Europeans into Europe as a migration, maybe anyway.

Also - Japan! From what I've understood there seems to be some indication that the Ainu are the descendents of an earlier partly "australoid" population that inhabited Japan before the ancestors of the Yamato people there...
 
Likes: robto

robto

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
6,149
Lisbon, Portugal
#53
Here in the US, non-Hispanic Whites are gradually losing their majority as a result of large-scale non-White immigration to the US combined with higher non-White birth rates. (The higher non-White birthrates in themselves would not have been anywhere near enough to make the US majority non-White without large-scale non-White immigration to the US.) The same pattern appears to be going on in Canada, Australia, and possibly New Zealand and/or some Western European countries as well. These countries have become much more welcoming to non-White immigrants over the last several decades and thus accordingly saw a huge increase in their non-White populations as a result of large-scale non-White immigration and probably higher non-White birth rates.

My question is this--what additional realistic cases could there have been of a group losing its majority in a country as a result of immigration? For the record, I don't mean settler colonialism; settler colonialism involves the rule of one people by another people. In contrast, what I am talking about here are democratic countries where the people determine their own destiny nevertheless experiencing significant demographic changes as a result of large-scale immigration--up to the point of the dominant ethnic group in these countries losing its majority or even plurality.

What additional realistic cases of this could there have been? Also, please limit yourselves to scenarios that have a point of departure (from real life) in 1850 or later.

It happened in Brazil during the late 19th century and beginning of the 20th. Most of the Brazilian population at the beginning of the 19th century was either black or mixed-race, with a very low white population, but by half of the 20th century the people that defined themselves as white became the largest racial group (but still not the majority).
 
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Apr 2018
979
Upland, Sweden
#54
It happen in Brazil during the late 19th century and beginning of the 20th. Most Brazilian population at the beginning of the 19th century was either black or mixed-race, with a very low white population, but by half of the 20th century the people that defined themselves as white became the largest racial group (but still not the majority).
How are ethnic relations in Brazil generally? I get the feelings things are less polarized and more fluid than in the US or Western Europe, but maybe that is my fantasy?
 

robto

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
6,149
Lisbon, Portugal
#55
How are ethnic relations in Brazil generally? I get the feelings things are less polarized and more fluid than in the US or Western Europe, but maybe that is my fantasy?
Racial relations in Brazil were always more fluid and less dichotomous as the one in the US for example, simply because the Portuguese colonial system in Brazil established a different kind of racial society than the British did in North America.

If not to say, that racism does play a role in society in Brazil, although more unconsciously when compared to US. The more phenotypically black and indigenous you are, the more likely you are at the bottom of society - or not part of society at all like the isolated indigenous tribes.
 

robto

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
6,149
Lisbon, Portugal
#56
Yeah, if you want to go somewhat closer in time I suppose you could speak of the proto-Indo Europeans into Europe as a migration, maybe anyway.

Also - Japan! From what I've understood there seems to be some indication that the Ainu are the descendents of an earlier partly "australoid" population that inhabited Japan before the ancestors of the Yamato people there...
The demise of the Ainu was just the last chapter of a larger historical trend that was initiated since the Yayoi period more than 1000 years ago, that culminated in the absorption and replacement of the direct descendants of the paleolithic peoples of the Japanese home islands.
 

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
35,044
T'Republic of Yorkshire
#57
Also - Japan! From what I've understood there seems to be some indication that the Ainu are the descendents of an earlier partly "australoid" population that inhabited Japan before the ancestors of the Yamato people there...
Correct. The Emishi were the Jomon period inhabitants of Japan. They were, IIRC, a Melanesian people. Yje were gradually supplanted during the Yayoi period (300BC-300AD) by migrants from around the Korean peninsular, but they were not fully conquered until the 8tj century. There is some evidence that some of the Emishi (the "north Fujiwara") from the Kanto area (around modern day Tokyo) were assimilated into the upper echelons of Japanese society.
 
Apr 2018
979
Upland, Sweden
#58
Racial relations in Brazil were always more fluid and less dichotomous as the one in the US for example, simply because the Portuguese colonial system in Brazil established a different kind of racial society than the British did in North America.

If not to say, that racism does play a role in society in Brazil, although more unconsciously when compared to US. The more phenotypically black and indigenous you are, the more likely you are at the bottom of society - or not part of society at all like the isolated indigenous tribes.
Right! There seems to be some advantages to that way of thinking... it feels a lot more human and pragmatic than the "one drop" policy...

Anyway, interesting.
 
Apr 2018
979
Upland, Sweden
#59
Correct. The Emishi were the Jomon period inhabitants of Japan. They were, IIRC, a Melanesian people. Yje were gradually supplanted during the Yayoi period (300BC-300AD) by migrants from around the Korean peninsular, but they were not fully conquered until the 8tj century. There is some evidence that some of the Emishi (the "north Fujiwara") from the Kanto area (around modern day Tokyo) were assimilated into the upper echelons of Japanese society.
Very interesting. What is the Japanese self-conception of this entire process, do you know? Is there some kind of mythological narrative around it, similar to how the Greeks looked at the "Dorians" perhaps?
 

robto

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
6,149
Lisbon, Portugal
#60
Correct. The Emishi were the Jomon period inhabitants of Japan. They were, IIRC, a Melanesian people. Yje were gradually supplanted during the Yayoi period (300BC-300AD) by migrants from around the Korean peninsular, but they were not fully conquered until the 8tj century. There is some evidence that some of the Emishi (the "north Fujiwara") from the Kanto area (around modern day Tokyo) were assimilated into the upper echelons of Japanese society.
What "IIRC" stands for? And why some of the Emishi - a conquered people that were technologically inferior - be included in the upper echelons of Japanese society? That seems odd.