Additional cases of a group losing its majority in a country as a result of immigration?

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
32,097
T'Republic of Yorkshire
#61
Very interesting. What is the Japanese self-conception of this entire process, do you know? Is there some kind of mythological narrative around it, similar to how the Greeks looked at the "Dorians" perhaps?
Yes, parts of it have become stories in Japan#s mytho-historical narrative. For example, there is a legendary race of monsters known as the "tsuchigumo", or Earth Spider. There is evidence that the term is in fact, the name of tribe of "hairy" people, which suggests that tehy are Emishi. The name appears to derive from the tribal mark or fetish, and has become corrupted to refer to monsters.

The Japanese learned a lot of their warfare from these people. The Emishi had horses, whereas at that time, the Japanese were still reliant on Chinese Tang-dynasty style warfare. The Yamato people adopted that method of warfare, which eventually eveolved into "the way of the horse and bow", or the way of the samurai.
 

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
32,097
T'Republic of Yorkshire
#62
What "IIRC" stands for? And why some of the Emishi - a conquered people that were technologically inferior - be included in the upper echelons of Japanese society? That seems odd.
IIRC = If I Recall Correctly

The northern Fujiwara were assimilated as they were left in place as the ruling class of the conquered people. I think they pledged allegiance to the Japanese Emperor, while other tribes did not - the Emishi weren't a monolithic bloc.
 
Apr 2018
739
Upland, Sweden
#63
Yes, parts of it have become stories in Japan#s mytho-historical narrative. For example, there is a legendary race of monsters known as the "tsuchigumo", or Earth Spider. There is evidence that the term is in fact, the name of tribe of "hairy" people, which suggests that tehy are Emishi. The name appears to derive from the tribal mark or fetish, and has become corrupted to refer to monsters.

The Japanese learned a lot of their warfare from these people. The Emishi had horses, whereas at that time, the Japanese were still reliant on Chinese Tang-dynasty style warfare. The Yamato people adopted that method of warfare, which eventually eveolved into "the way of the horse and bow", or the way of the samurai.
Cool.
 
Nov 2011
8,845
The Dustbin, formerly, Garden of England
#64
During the 19th century the Boers lost majority status in South Africa to British immigration. It may have happened twice. The first time the Boers trekked inland to establish their own republics. When the British immigrants followed them later, after gold and diamonds were discovered in the Boers lands, then two Boer Wars had to be fought.
At no time were burghers outnumbered by English speakers except in localised areas, such as Natal, which was never a Dutch or Boer colony, and, at various times, towns like P. Elizabeth , Knysna, East London and Grahamstown. Kimberley acquired a majority English population after the discovery of diamonds as did Johannesburg after 1885 (and for a heady decade in the 1880s, so did Barberton), but neither did the Northern Cape or Transvaal become majority English speaking. It should be noted that "English" speakers tended to include anyone who didn't speak either Dutch or the "taal". At no time did White people outnumber indigenous peoples at any period in history on a provincial or a nationwide basis.
 
Oct 2015
4,969
Matosinhos Portugal
#65
It is estimated that there are about 550 thousand Portuguese and Portuguese descendants in Canada, with a large majority located in the province of Ontario.