Advanced Allied Military Technology (Secret Weapons) in World War 2

Apr 2014
277
Istanbul Turkey
#1
In World War 2 literature a lot of things were written , researched about superior German military technology or Secret Weapons like V-1 flying bombs , V-2 ballistic missiles , ME262 jet fighters and other jet engine propelled aircraft models , remote controlled tanks , hydrogen peroksite propolsion engined submarine technology , Sturmgewehr 44 assault rifle , Nebelferwehr rocket propelled mortars , MG42 machine guns , heavy big cat tanks (Tigers , Panthers) , 88 mm guns etc

What we do not have much research or resource (maybe aside from Manhattan Project nuclear bomb research and ULTRA-British decryption program of German Enigma wireless communication code) about advanced Allied military technology , superior Allied Secret Weapons. How so ? Why we do not have much to read or research about them ?

And what else can you catagorise as superior Allied military technology ? Electronics Warfare , radar , counter radar technology , electronic counter measures ? Artillery shell fuses with radar receivers ? Floating tanks and amphibious vehicles / equipment like DUKWs ? Anything else you can think of ? Or is the general consesus that Germans had all cool superior toys ?
 
Apr 2014
277
Istanbul Turkey
#3
I just remembered , RAF big scale bombs like Bouncing Bomb ( to breach Ruhr Dams ) , Tallboy and Grand Slam bombs that penetrated concentrate bunkers and caused small scale sysmic quakes also can be counted as Allied superior hardware. Or Lord Mountbatten's idea of using icebergs as mobile bases close to French coast before D-Day. Of course latter was just a crazy theory.
 
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Nemowork

Ad Honorem
Jan 2011
8,180
South of the barcodes
#4
The Germans had a badly organised state, they couldnt do large scale production.


Thats why they had to concentrate on these super weapons, to counter their weakness in supply, production, manpower and so on.


So the allies advances tend to be hidden better. One of the best examples is in ammunition, the development of high quality armour piercing rounds.
The best example is in radar though. First in the invention of things like the cavity magnetron and centimetre wavelength radar sets, then sets small enough that they can be used in planes for ground targetting and finally small and cheap enough that they can fit inside a single shell to be fired at planes, V1s and even tanks.


Antibiotics that keep a soldier fit and return him to battle quickly.


High quality fuel to give maximum performance from engines, high quality engines to run it in, streamlined factory production and so on.


The Germans were devoted to the idea of producing A weapon, the allies were more interested in improving the whole syste,. so the German might have a tiger tank, the allies would have a combined system of anti-tank guns, tanks, mortars, artillery, air support and communication.
 

Chlodio

Ad Honorem
Aug 2016
3,058
Dispargum
#5
Enemy secret weapons are more likely to garner attention in the media than are friendly secret weapons, since we are not surprised by our own secret weapons but we are surprised by enemy secret weapons. British civilians and news media noticed V-1s and V-2s when they started landing in London. Secret weapons the Allies deployed against the Germans tended to go unnoticed by Allied civilians and Allied media.

German jet fighters were a secret weapon. So were Allied jet fighters that didn't get into the war in large numbers and so passed unnoticed. By the late 1940s every advanced power had jet technology so there was no longer a need to keep it secret. In the Korean War jets were no longer a secret weapon.

Chaff, strips of aluminum foil that make false blips on enemy radar screens, was a wartime secret for a while, but it was simple technology and once the enemy figured out how it worked, it was declassified.

For the first two years of the Pacific War the US had faulty torpedoes. Classified at the time, it was declassified shortly after we fixed the problems. Already in the late 1940s US wartime torpedo problems were being discussed openly.

The development of long range bombers like the B-29 was kept classified until we started using them. Then their existance could no longer be denied so they were declassified (at least as to their range).
 
Apr 2014
277
Istanbul Turkey
#6
I really missed antibiotics. Good catch.

RAF also had Glouster Meteor jet propelled fighters starting by first half of 1944. They were never deployed over Europe to fight Luftwaffe in case one shot down and enemy examines its technical secrets in wreckage. They were kept in British airspace to fight against V-1 flying bombs.
 
Jul 2016
7,353
USA
#7
B-29 bomber program was more expensive than the Manhattan Project.

According to all the air power aficionados who had the ear of FDR and Churchill both, they alone were supposed to win the war. Total costs wasted on that lie is incalculable, manpower eise the USAAF 8th AF lost more individuals than the Marine Corps, and these were the best of the best recruits inducted got sent to the USAAF. The British RAF Bomber Command lost fully 44% KIA of total personnel in air crews. They definitely had an effect on the war, but nothing major and nothing remotely close to what the Bomber Barons promised.

Nothing Germany did was even remotely comparable in material or manpower cost.
 
Jan 2015
2,697
MD, USA
#8
Norden bomb sight, proximity fuse for anti-aircraft artillery, TV-guided anti-shipping missiles, X-craft minisubs, escort carriers.


Heck, the whole Overlord plan, with all the dummy bases! That worked pretty well.


Matthew
 
Jul 2016
7,353
USA
#10
Pipeline. That was a good choice. So simple, yet super effective.

For Pacific, I'd say aerial dropped marine mines, XXI Bomber Command fought tooth and nail not to participate and it turned out to be one of the most effective use of air power.