Advanced Allied Military Technology (Secret Weapons) in World War 2

Jun 2015
1,252
Scotland
#71
'It was the Americans who discovered the speed of light was a constant in the Michelson-Morely experiment, an experiment critical to Einstein's theory of relativity. '

Actually the constant speed of light was a discovery of James Clerk Maxwell in the 1880s. It wasn't a result he expected but fell out of his calculations. When Einstein stated his theories were the result of others work he was largely thinking of Maxwell a picture of who graced his study. The Michelson-Morely experiment provided confirmation of something that was already well known to be correct.
 
Jun 2011
270
The Old Dominion
#72
Superior German technology and engineering? oh, my sweet Aunt Tillie!
Can anyone with a real knowledge of WW2 aircraft carriers and aircraft carrier operations use the words "Graf Zeppelin" and "aircraft carrier" in a sentence without laughing?
ROFLMAO . . . see?
 
Oct 2016
838
Merryland
#73
I don't think John Bull was amused at the thought of a Nazi carrier.
imagine the Tirpitz with a carrier escort, raiding North Sea convoys.
the sort of thing that kept Churchill up at night.
 
May 2011
13,462
Navan, Ireland
#74
I don't think John Bull was amused at the thought of a Nazi carrier.
imagine the Tirpitz with a carrier escort, raiding North Sea convoys.
the sort of thing that kept Churchill up at night.
You mean the reaction to a German Naval Battle Group launching itself to raid British coastal water -lets say a Battleship ,Cruiser, 6 destroyers plus the Aircraft Carrier-- against the RN Battle Fleets outside the range of Luftwaffe fighters but in range of the RAF?

I suspect John Bull would be delighted and amazed at German stupidity at the same time.
 
Jun 2012
780
#75
The German aircraft industry was behind the British throughout the war. Britain employed fewer people yet built more aircraft, of much greater weight, and more aircraft engines, than the Germans. For example, 1941:

Employment in air industries:
Germany 1,850,000
UK 1,259,400

Aircraft production:
Germany 11,776
UK 20,094

Airframe weight:
Germany 68,000,000 lbs
UK 87,000,000 lbs

Germany employed more people in the aircraft industry in 1941 than the UK did at any point during the war, yet production was far behind the UK.
 
Nov 2011
8,757
The Dustbin, formerly, Garden of England
#76
Synthetic Rubber (US)
100 Octane aviation fuel (US)
Radar blind landing system (US/UK joint)
Radar Navigation (UK/US Joint)
Frequency hopping radio (US and UK independently developed)
Napalm (US)
Bailey Bridge (UK)
Plastic explosives (UK )
High-explosive squash head (HESH) Anti-tank ammo (UK)
Pressurised aircraft cabin (US) (B29 only production aircraft--technology experimented with elsewhere)
Supersonic-ready aircraft control surfaces--(UK)
Fog Investigation and Dispersal Operation (FIDO) (UK)


Many other technologies were developed in WW2 an only implemented in the years after the war, such as angled flight decks, optical landing systems for carriers and science and industrial disciplines such as Operational Research, developed during Radar development and Critical Path Analysis developed during the Manhatten project.
 
Jun 2011
270
The Old Dominion
#77
I don't think John Bull was amused at the thought of a Nazi carrier.
imagine the Tirpitz with a carrier escort, raiding North Sea convoys.
the sort of thing that kept Churchill up at night.
What North Sea Convoys? Murmansk bound convoys approached the Norwegian Sea from the North Atlantic around west of the Faroes, not from the North Sea side. A North Sea convoy, except where a coastal gaggle hugging the coast of Scotland to get around John o' Groats for points west, would be be going where? Everything to the east, except Sweden, was controlled by the Germans and the Finns, and to the north, at the entrance to the Norwegian Sea, was Trondheim Fjord where Tirpitz lay, a Grindell lair to be avoided.

I suspect that had Graf Zeppelin had ventured into the Atlantic acompanied by whatever friends, and it certainly would not have been so capable no earlier than mid to late 1942, the gleeful rubbing of hands in anticipation in RN and USN circles would have probably started some fires.

Seriously, the presence of Graf Zeppelin with Tirpitz would be more of a liability than a force multiplier . . .

que the canned audience laughter
 
Oct 2018
53
Minneapolis, MN
#78
I always get annoyed at the way everyone says 'the Germans were more advanced than the allies because they built jets' while never asking if attempting to develop jets was actually a good idea. The construction technology of the Mossie was arguably closer to first world war than cold war (wooden construction, built in small factories widely spread before final construction), yet it was far more effective as a war weapon than the ME 262:

It was easier and cheaper to produce:
Easier for pilots to learn on:
A more versatile weapon, capable of performing as both both bomber and fighter:
All while being capable of speeds that, for at least part of the war, made it one of the fastest aircraft in the skies.

Capable of carrying a heavy armament, radar, high and low altitude operations it was in many ways one of the first modern multi-role aircraft.
I think it was clear that building jets was a huge step forward. People talked about the B-29 as a huge weapon of the war there and the reason it made it 15 years before needing replacement and the B-52 has made it 60 plus was jet propulsion. Once the Mig 15 came out in the early 50's, the B-29 was obsolete (especially in daytime).

I think Germany's failure with jets was that in the early years of the war they were having so much success with their Blitzkrieg, they didn't finance and support that program as well as they should have.

The Mosquito was clearly far more effective because the ME 262 project barely had gotten off the ground. Would be like comparing the F-16 to the F-35 today. Sure the F-16 has the much more effective history. But the F-35 is clearly more advanced.

But it is amazing how quickly the weapons had grown. The Japanese zero was dominant in 1941, and utterly overmatched by 1944. Panzer III's ruled the field in 1940, and by 1944 were clearly outclassed by the JS3

Think early in that war a LOT of WWI weapons and ships were still being used.


A huge one was the landing ships and higgins boats. Instead of needing a pier cranes, etc to land tanks and people from the sea, you could pull right up on the beach. Big not only in getting into Europe, but the island hopping across the Pacific.
 
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Apr 2014
279
Istanbul Turkey
#79
I think it was clear that building jets was a huge step forward. People talked about the B-29 as a huge weapon of the war there and the reason it made it 15 years before needing replacement and the B-52 has made it 60 plus was jet propulsion. Once the Mig 15 came out in the early 50's, the B-29 was obsolete (especially in daytime).

I think Germany's failure with jets was that in the early years of the war they were having so much success with their Blitzkrieg, they didn't finance and support that program as well as they should have.

The Mosquito was clearly far more effective because the ME 262 project barely had gotten off the ground. Would be like comparing the F-16 to the F-35 today. Sure the F-16 has the much more effective history. But the F-35 is clearly more advanced.

But it is amazing how quickly the weapons had grown. The Japanese zero was dominant in 1941, and utterly overmatched by 1944. Panzer III's ruled the field in 1940, and by 1944 were clearly outclassed by the JS3

Think early in that war a LOT of WWI weapons and ships were still being used.


A huge one was the landing ships and higgins boats. Instead of needing a pier cranes, etc to land tanks and people from the sea, you could pull right up on the beach. Big not only in getting into Europe, but the island hopping across the Pacific.

Why people forget , dismiss or ignore that RAF also had built Glouster Meteor jet models in 1943 which were became operational in squadron strength in 1944. Luftwaffe did not have complate domintion in first jet aircraft models.
 
Dec 2014
348
Wales
#80
I think it was clear that building jets was a huge step forward. People talked about the B-29 as a huge weapon of the war there and the reason it made it 15 years before needing replacement and the B-52 has made it 60 plus was jet propulsion. Once the Mig 15 came out in the early 50's, the B-29 was obsolete (especially in daytime).

I think Germany's failure with jets was that in the early years of the war they were having so much success with their Blitzkrieg, they didn't finance and support that program as well as they should have.

The Mosquito was clearly far more effective because the ME 262 project barely had gotten off the ground. Would be like comparing the F-16 to the F-35 today. Sure the F-16 has the much more effective history. But the F-35 is clearly more advanced.

But it is amazing how quickly the weapons had grown. The Japanese zero was dominant in 1941, and utterly overmatched by 1944. Panzer III's ruled the field in 1940, and by 1944 were clearly outclassed by the JS3

Think early in that war a LOT of WWI weapons and ships were still being used.


A huge one was the landing ships and higgins boats. Instead of needing a pier cranes, etc to land tanks and people from the sea, you could pull right up on the beach. Big not only in getting into Europe, but the island hopping across the Pacific.
I'm sorry but you miss the point. Yes, Jets were going to be a major advantage - after years of testing and development. But the Germans were at war now, and coming up with a weapon that would give you an advantage after the war was lost was a waste of time. The reason I point to the Mosquito (and I could have pointed to the Mustang just as easily) is that this is an advanced weapon system, using proven technology, that is going to give you a massive advantage now, not in several years time (you notice the Jet examples you gave took years of post-war testing to refine), and will prove to be responsible for the eventual victory of the Allies.

When it first flew in 1941 the Mosquito instantly became the fastest aircraft in the sky. It would serve as a low to medium-altitude daytime tactical bomber, high-altitude night bomber, pathfinder, day or night fighter, fighter-bomber, intruder, maritime strike aircraft, and fast photo-reconnaissance aircraft. It was also used by the British Overseas Airways Corporation (BOAC) as a fast transport to carry small high-value cargoes to, and from, neutral countries, through enemy-controlled airspace, and it would do all this before the first ME 262 even took to the skies.

The British produced more than 6,700 mosquito's during the war compared to about 1400 ME 262 (despite the mass use of brutal slave labour to build the 262), simply because the Mosquito flew some 3 years before the ME 262. It's also worth noting that the Germans could never manage to operate more than about 200 at any one time due to reliability and resource problems. 200 planes, no matter how good, were never going to make any difference to the outcome of the war. I also particularly love the fact that, due to their extreme vulnerability on take-off and landing, the 262's had to have cover when landing provided by Focke-Wulf 190's (of which the German's built some 20,000).

One of the things that is noticeable about all of the 'amazing' German technology is the phrase ' too little, too late'. Perhaps there is a lesson to be taken from that.