Afghan aversion for Daal (lentils)

Nov 2014
456
India
#21
They usually have good things to say about Indians (much to the annoyance of Pakistanis). I dont know if its genuine good sentiments for Indians or it stems from 'enemy of my enemy is my friend'.

Another quote from Mirza Ata. He does not like Sindh because it does not have white bread (Naan). Dalraymple writes, "Mirza ‘Ata, the most articulate Afghan writer of the period, sounds like Babur when he talks proudly of Afghanistan as ‘so much more refined than wretched Sindh where white bread and educated talk are unknown".

Mirza Ata was most probably a Dari speaker (reputed for their sophistication). He was part of Shah Shuja army in 1833 which occupied Shikarpur town in Sindh first before advance to Kanadhar. They were routed by Barakzais near Kandahar and the expedition ended in failure. He would try again in 1838.
I do not eat nan. Period. I find whole wheat Tanduri roti with butter very much attractive. It has a roasted flavour and applying butter enhances it. In my family only kids eat nan.
 
Aug 2014
1,032
pakistan
#22
I do not eat nan. Period. I find whole wheat Tanduri roti with butter very much attractive. It has a roasted flavour and applying butter enhances it. In my family only kids eat nan.
Same is case with me. In my region Lakki Marwat, there is no concept of Naan. There are five types of bread eaten in my Lakki Marwat ;

1- Large sized chapati which we call pasti.

2- Whole wheat bread of Tandur you are talking about, 'tanaro rottai' as we say it. We also apply butter to it on occasions which melts on hot bread.

2- "Nghan" bread, a thick spongy bread prepared from wheat. Its a traditional and unique bread of my area but i dont like it.

4- Thick corn bread, we call it 'kakorraey'

5- Bread of gram flour which we call 'gaddola'
 
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Aupmanyav

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
4,990
New Delhi, India
#23
They usually have good things to say about Indians (much to the annoyance of Pakistanis). I dont know if its genuine good sentiments for Indians or it stems from 'enemy of my enemy is my friend'.
India / Pashtoon interests have never collided. They say 'familiarity breeds contempt'. That is perhaps what happens between Afghanistan, Pakistan and India.
 
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Aug 2014
1,032
pakistan
#25
daalkhor is used as "insult" by afghans for indic Pakistanis specially punjabis , they call you gul khan
Gul Khan is very recent invention, and i happen to know the original person who coined it (he is from Pakistan, affiliated to ANP party). Pashtun nationalists of Pakistan used it for those Pashtuns who love their country and are ready to do any for it out of simple-mindedness. It was rather sweet term, not hateful. The other side also threw back a sweet word 'Gul Marjan'. Unfortunately those from Afghanistan heard it and not understanding the context, began to use it as name calling during hate-mongering. Now it has become part of hate-speech.

Daalkhor insult on the other hand goes way back. The first time i heard it, was in 90s (around 1998) from a mouth of an Afghan refugee for a local Pashtun. Whenever an Afghanistani refugee quarrels with Pakistani Pashtun on the street, the former throws daalkhor insult at the latter. I witnessed it many times and wondered what is all that about. Our people usually dont know the context for appears-to-be quite benign name calling about eating pulses and it does not offend us as we indeed grow pulses on our soil and eat it as dish in our homes. By that Afghanistanis usually, but not always, mean that 'you are not true Pashtun', 'you are indianized'.
 
Jan 2019
10
Pakistan
#26
Gul Khan is very recent invention, and i happen to know the original person who coined it (he is from Pakistan, affiliated to ANP party). Pashtun nationalists of Pakistan used it for those Pashtuns who love their country and are ready to do any for it out of simple-mindedness. It was rather sweet term, not hateful. The other side also threw back a sweet word 'Gul Marjan'. Unfortunately those from Afghanistan heard it and not understanding the context, began to use it as name calling during hate-mongering. Now it has become part of hate-speech.

Daalkhor insult on the other hand goes way back. The first time i heard it, was in 90s (around 1998) from a mouth of an Afghan refugee for a local Pashtun. Whenever an Afghanistani refugee quarrels with Pakistani Pashtun on the street, the former throws daalkhor insult at the latter. I witnessed it many times and wondered what is all that about. Our people usually dont know the context for appears-to-be quite benign name calling about eating pulses and it does not offend us as we indeed grow pulses on our soil and eat it as dish in our homes. By that Afghanistanis usually, but not always, mean that 'you are not true Pashtun', 'you are indianized'.
most hateful slurs/terms have harmless/sweet origin but hijacked by wrong people imo
 
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Aupmanyav

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
4,990
New Delhi, India
#27
Azad, do you or Afghans have salty bread? Bread i which you put salt while making it? I have heard a lot about Afghan breads, They are available in Delhi, but have no tasted them. I am a salt person, perhps the efect of age, I need a lot of salt in my food.
 
Aug 2014
1,032
pakistan
#28
Azad, do you or Afghans have salty bread? Bread i which you put salt while making it? I have heard a lot about Afghan breads, They are available in Delhi, but have no tasted them. I am a salt person, perhps the efect of age, I need a lot of salt in my food.
You mean very salty bread? because salt is needed for bread making , as they say 'Atay may namak key barabar'.

We rather prepare very sweet bread with 'gur' on occasions.
 

Aupmanyav

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
4,990
New Delhi, India
#29
My wife would not add salt to atta. I have reminded her of the proverb since decades. Yeah, there was a time when I liked Sugar Paranthas. I can still consume one or two, but do not hunger for it. :(
 
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