Afghan aversion for Daal (lentils)

specul8

Ad Honorem
Oct 2016
2,525
Australia
#31
Sigh .... you guys make Aussie bread eating habits embarrassing !

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Although at the moment I have found a nice brand of soft corn tortilla . had some last night with re-fried black beans (with garlic, chopped coriander stems, red onion and roasted cumin seed ; that's a bit like a dhal .

I mean , is that a bit like dhal ? :)
 
Likes: Kadi
Jul 2017
510
Sydney
#32
Sigh .... you guys make Aussie bread eating habits embarrassing !

View attachment 15149


Although at the moment I have found a nice brand of soft corn tortilla . had some last night with re-fried black beans (with garlic, chopped coriander stems, red onion and roasted cumin seed ; that's a bit like a dhal .

I mean , is that a bit like dhal ? :)
That would be akin to Rajma, which is red beans
 
Nov 2014
456
India
#34
My wife would not add salt to atta. I have reminded her of the proverb since decades. Yeah, there was a time when I liked Sugar Paranthas. I can still consume one or two, but do not hunger for it. :(
Not adding salt while cooking cereals is quite common in India. Most do not add salt while cooking rice. In Karnataka, salt is not added while cooking ragi balls (Google: Ragi is a whole grain that is gluten-free and a staple in South India. It is rich in fibre that helps with weight loss and diabetes. It's packed with calcium, good carbs, amino acids and Vitamin D.).

It has religious connotations as well. For example, while preparing rice balls as symbols of the deceased ancestors, unsalted cooked rice is a must.
The Portuguese in Goa, during the inquisition, had even banned cooking rice without salt. This ban was implemented for stopping the newly converted local Christians from practising Hindu rituals while praying to their ancestors.
 
Likes: Aupmanyav

Aupmanyav

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
4,990
New Delhi, India
#35
Yeah, beans are daal. Today I got Makki roti with Sarson Saag (Mustard Greens) with some old gur. Nice, but my daughter-in-law was too stingy with ghee. She is Punjabi. I do not know why she was hesitating! What is food without ghee?
 
Aug 2014
1,032
pakistan
#36
I found this typical diet chart for Afghans. All the quantities are given in kgs/person/year

Don't seem to be big on meat, @Azad67
On average Afghans/Pashtuns consume more meat than other South Asians.

"The average Frontierman is particularly fond of meat, and it is believed that more meat per head is consumed in the Frontier than in any other part of India, the Province importing every year slaughter cattle worth about Rs.18 lakhs in addition to the locally raised stock for the purpose. ["The Indian Journal of Economics", Vol-23, 1943]
 
Likes: Kadi
Jul 2017
510
Sydney
#37
On average Afghans/Pashtuns consume more meat than other South Asians.

"The average Frontierman is particularly fond of meat, and it is believed that more meat per head is consumed in the Frontier than in any other part of India, the Province importing every year slaughter cattle worth about Rs.18 lakhs in addition to the locally raised stock for the purpose. ["The Indian Journal of Economics", Vol-23, 1943]
Its possible, in fact I'd say you're right about that

But when compared to the western countries, this amount of meat is almost negligible

The chart I had, which appeared in a peer reviewed journal, shows an average Afghan to consume 12 kgs of meat per year (let's say it's actually 15 kgs)

In the US, the same figure is 80 kgs for the year
 

Aupmanyav

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
4,990
New Delhi, India
#39
It has religious connotations as well. For example, while preparing rice balls as symbols of the deceased ancestors, unsalted cooked rice is a must.
The Portuguese in Goa, during the inquisition, had even banned cooking rice without salt. This ban was implemented for stopping the newly converted local Christians from practising Hindu rituals while praying to their ancestors.
Nice info, Prashanth, thanks. I know about Ragi but I do not think it is available with the grocers here. Also, I have not checked thoroughly. I suppose, the bread with Ragi may not be soft as with wheat. Perhaps something like Rajasthani Bajra, with which I am familiar. I have a Goan sister-in-law in Mumbai who is a convert from (Saraswata) Brahmins.
On average Afghans/Pashtuns consume more meat than other South Asians. The average Frontierman is particularly fond of meat, and it is believed that more meat per head is consumed in the Frontier than in any other part of India, ..
Who is not, if the person is a non-vegetarian? :D
 

Devdas

Ad Honorem
Apr 2015
4,052
India
#40
They usually have good things to say about Indians (much to the annoyance of Pakistanis). I dont know if its genuine good sentiments for Indians or it stems from 'enemy of my enemy is my friend'.

Another quote from Mirza Ata. He does not like Sindh because it does not have white bread (Naan). Dalraymple writes, "Mirza ‘Ata, the most articulate Afghan writer of the period, sounds like Babur when he talks proudly of Afghanistan as ‘so much more refined than wretched Sindh where white bread and educated talk are unknown".

Mirza Ata was most probably a Dari speaker (reputed for their sophistication). He was part of Shah Shuja army in 1833 which occupied Shikarpur town in Sindh first before advance to Kanadhar. They were routed by Barakzais near Kandahar and the expedition ended in failure. He would try again in 1838.
Punjabis are the immediate neighbours of Pashtuns, so the aversion for the Punjabi food can be understood. This would inflated with the Afghanistan-Pakistan enmity over Durand Line. Its quite natural people miss their home food away from home. Infact, I also like eating naan but I can't eat it regularly, I would prefer the soft round roti daily.