Afghanistan during the PDPA (People's Democratic Party of Afghanistan)

JoanOfArc007

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,170
USA
These are images we do not see from Afghanistan even today. It has been decades since Afghans had some level of a semblance in freedom. I see in the images below women being able to even not wear a hijab, I have not seen one modern day picture in Afghanistan of a woman without a Hijab. It was the Communists that brought education to the masses of Afghanistan....and even though they are out of power for the most part today in Afghanistan, at least some Afghan people were able to get educated because the Communist system opposed religious bigotry.

 

JoanOfArc007

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,170
USA
The Communists in Power In retrospect, there is a tendency to minimize the Afghan communists as simply pawns of the Soviet Union. They certainly were close to Moscow, but they were never obedient pawns. The KGB never controlled them fully and never succeeded in mending the factional rift in the PDPA. The communists had their own constituency in Afghanistan, among the urban population, students, parts of the minority ethnic communities, women’s rights advocates, and believers in Marxism as the wave of the future. The PDPA would remain in power longer than the Communist Party of the Soviet Union; indeed, it would outlast the USSR.

 

JoanOfArc007

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,170
USA
Whats interesting about the history of Muslim Communists in Afghanistan is they were diverse in thought. A # of Afghan Communists opposed not only the Taliban types but also the Soviet Communist system itself. Afghan Communists such as Meena Kamal for example and her opposition to both the Soviets and Taliban is known among the educated of Afghanistan to this day. Kamal was only 31 when she was assassinated for her views. Kamal seemend to have been a hardcore socialist, she probably opposed the USA and Soviet Union equally. I would have probably disagreed with Kamal on some things but I certainly admire her for supporting equality among man.

MEENA (1956-1987) was born on February 27, 1956 in Kabul. During her school days, students in Kabul and other Afghan cities were deeply engaged in social activism and rising mass movements. She left the university to devote herself as a social activist to organizing and educating women. In pursuit of her cause for gaining the right of freedom of expression and conducting political activities, Meena laid the foundation of RAWA in 1977. This organization was meant to give voice to the deprived and silenced women of Afghanistan. She started a campaign against the Russian forces and their puppet regime in 1979 and organized numerous processions and meetings in schools, colleges and Kabul University to mobilize public opinion.

Another great service rendered by her for the Afghan women is the launching of a bilingual magazine, Payam-e-Zan (Women's Message) in 1981. Through this magazine RAWA has been projecting the cause of Afghan women boldly and effectively. Payam-e-Zan has constantly exposed the criminal nature of fundamentalist groups. Meena also established Watan Schools for refugee children, a hospital and handicraft centers for refugee women in Pakistan to support Afghan women financially.

Biography of Martyred Meena, RAWA's founding leader
 

Maki

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
4,093
Republika Srpska
The Communists in Power In retrospect, there is a tendency to minimize the Afghan communists as simply pawns of the Soviet Union. They certainly were close to Moscow, but they were never obedient pawns. The KGB never controlled them fully and never succeeded in mending the factional rift in the PDPA. The communists had their own constituency in Afghanistan, among the urban population, students, parts of the minority ethnic communities, women’s rights advocates, and believers in Marxism as the wave of the future. The PDPA would remain in power longer than the Communist Party of the Soviet Union; indeed, it would outlast the USSR.

I mean, yeah, the Soviets intervened in 1979 not just to secure the Communist rule, but to oust a Communist leader they did not like. Hafizullah Amin would later be killed by the Soviets.
 

pikeshot1600

Ad Honoris
Jul 2009
10,136
Pakistan has never wanted a unified, and certainly not a strong, Afghan regime on its flank. About 99% of Pakistan's foreign policy revolves around fear of India, and fear of something - whatever that might be - in Afghanistan that is not controllable by the Pakistani ISI. A communist regime there was a major reason Pakistan in the 1980s supported anti-government operations while trying to keep all the factions divided and as weak as possible.

Afghanistan is a lost cause. It is an artificial construct that is used by stronger states as a proxy battleground. Those states don't care about much else. When the Chinese get the chance to rape Afghanistan's mineral wealth, let's see how they win hearts and minds. China does not appear to like Muslims much.
 

JoanOfArc007

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,170
USA
I mean, yeah, the Soviets intervened in 1979 not just to secure the Communist rule, but to oust a Communist leader they did not like. Hafizullah Amin would later be killed by the Soviets.
Amins removal from power has been viewed as one of the Soviet Unions most successful special forces mission of Soviet history,


One of the Soviet Special forces members Oleg Balashov recalls the intense combat wrt the removal of Amin(who the Soviets felt was an American spy) from power in Afghanistan in 1979... Balashov talks of bravery on both sides of the operation. And not to mention their were Soviet Muslims that took part in Operation Storm 333 to remove Amin from power.
 
Last edited:
Sep 2019
486
Slovenia
Hafizullah Amin wanted to prevent that Afghanistan would become another Soviet puppet regime. He wanted better relations with China for example, where Mao's bloody era just ended and even communists saw that they lost the racing with Taiwan under KMT concerning economy. However Amin was involved in death of USA ambassador in Afganistan mr. Dubs.

 

JoanOfArc007

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,170
USA
Pakistan has never wanted a unified, and certainly not a strong, Afghan regime on its flank. About 99% of Pakistan's foreign policy revolves around fear of India, and fear of something - whatever that might be - in Afghanistan that is not controllable by the Pakistani ISI. A communist regime there was a major reason Pakistan in the 1980s supported anti-government operations while trying to keep all the factions divided and as weak as possible.

Afghanistan is a lost cause. It is an artificial construct that is used by stronger states as a proxy battleground. Those states don't care about much else. When the Chinese get the chance to rape Afghanistan's mineral wealth, let's see how they win hearts and minds. China does not appear to like Muslims much.
I dont think Afghanistan is a lost cause. To this day liberals in Afghanistan gather, underground if they have to....to promote ideas of freedom.


Pakistan, India and The USA and the other powers that be should support those in Afghanistan that support equality. Alot of the Youth of Afghanistan argue that Afghanistan has a rich and vibrant history, and groups such as the Taliban and Mujaheddin exemplified anti Afghan and anti Islamic views.
 

JoanOfArc007

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,170
USA
Hafizullah Amin wanted to prevent that Afghanistan would become another Soviet puppet regime. He wanted better relations with China for example, where Mao's bloody era just ended and even communists saw that they lost the racing with Taiwan under KMT concerning economy. However Amin was involved in death of USA ambassador in Afganistan mr. Dubs.

Thank you. We can see that in the 20th century history of Afghanistan...Liberal Afghans including Communists took a brave stand constantly even to this day...against Muslim bigoted Conservative leaning Afghans and non Afghans. These crazy Muslim Conservatives such as the Mujahideen and Taliban were opposed by Afghan liberals men and women alike such as Meena Kamal.