Africa walking behind on development.

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Mar 2012
1,579
Following the breeze
How about South Africa? Surly that is an African country that is more than developed enough to be mentioned as an example?
 
May 2013
1,097
SOMEWHERE
I feel almost honored that registered to the site and made an account just to comment on my topic.
First off welcome to Historum.



Do you see me saying I'm an expert on Africa anywhere in my comment.
I'm here too learn about that, and tell me if I done any research why the hell would be here to ask these questions.
This part of your reply is Irrelevant.

Implying I didn't get geography in Elementary school.
Thanks anyway.


So it's the fault of colonialism, but the second they were independent they turned their nations into a mess.
I have to disagree on this, it was a combination on both the weak governing skills of the fresh African nations aswell as the instability following the decolonization era that turned Africa into a mess. You said it yourself when they just got out of colonialism they were doing quite good.

China and the USA are doing most of the development work, china made the most roads, hospitals and schools in nations like Zimbabwe. It's neo-colonialism at its best, just look at how the American and French are bringing democracy to Uganda, The Central African Republic, Mali, Libya ,etc.

Implying I don't do any reading, I'm from born in African nation; Morocco and I visit it almost every year, and I can see the effect the Euro-crisis is having on many Spaniards. Morocco has been the nation for the most Spanish to flee too, and I've seen it firsthand. This However doesn't have any thing to do with my question and hence this part of the reply is yet again irrelevant.


I asked for a pretty tight criteria which none of those Empire except for the north African ones have met. I'll write it down for you to mention 1 empire to fit the criteria.
1. It has to be multi-continental.
2. It must have had great achievements in science, astrology, medicine etc,
I mentioned my creteria before and you didn't even read it, all your read was " HURR DURR Africa undevelopt bad HURR DURR" Didn't you?

Ooh now, you the leader of this topic , I've seen patern over and over in your comment you say all kinds of things without mentioning any sources. I could just lie and Google any book on Africa and claim to have read it. But that would fit no purpose or whatsoever, I'm to busy with reading books on Communism and in one of these books I came across a little bit of African history and hence I asked a question. But why don't you enlighten me and tell me what books on Africa you have read as of late.

again, welcome to Historum


1-Your first reply,you don't need to be a expert in afriacn history but if you had commn sense you would not need to go on a forum to ask these basica questions.
If their was bno such thing hasa internet how would you learn?many have gotton answesr in the past without coming on a forum before the internet.
There is a such thing as a library you know.second you should type in the info you are looking for with asking.
Just common sense,OR YOU SHOULD HAVE SAID ,were there any african empires has large has rome's?but you did not do that,instead you mind was made up.

2-First colonialism did had a part in africa mess,second i just said after africa was free from colonialism africa from 60' to early 80's or around there was doing fine on average.
The mess starting happening in the 80's but africa in the 90's but more so in the 2000's is doing better again.
Africans are doing most of the development work,nigerians for example have done most of the development,and Zimbabwe itself has well.
China did not start helping until the late 2000's
Most of the work and development is done by africans anyway.Some countries in africa have more chinese involvement than others so i ask that you be careful not to but africa in one bag when it comes to development.Gabon and botswana are two african countries that have done well with out the chinese.
They built themselves up like any other east asian country.


3-Empires do not need to be multi-continental.I do know were you get that from,but africa did have a few.
China's empire was not multi-continental.
Africa has had had great achievements in science, astrology, medicine etc,


4- Like i said do the research.
I HELP little since you said you ddi not know,of course you do know something said you talk about about chain but you need the other side. will send you a private email and you could take from there
 
May 2013
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First some info on modern africa and what africanS are doing for themselves.




this is really about progress




This old is olde but still good info.UPdated stuff after this.
[FONT=Verdana, Arial]Africa Rising June 24 2001 (Time Magazine)[/FONT]


[FONT=Verdana, Arial]Africa Rising June 24 2001 (Time Magazine)[/FONT]



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Hope is Africa's rarest commodity. Yet buried though it is amid the despair that haunts the continent, there is more optimism today than in decades. Francisco Mucavele found hope last September when an armored steel Casspir rolled over the hill and began to blow up the land mines contaminating Mozambique's rich soil. Olga Haptemariam acquired it in Eritrea's war-scarred port city of Massawa when she laid down 2,000 birr for a license to open a building-supply store. The villagers of N'Tjinina are finding it as they prepare for the solemn experience of voting in Mali's first local elections. Sarah Galloway Hage-Ali is spreading hope in Ghana, where she purchased the country's sole manufacturer of sanitary napkins in 1994 and launched a feminine-hygiene crusade.
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http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,138851,00.html



Quote:
Good News From The Congo. Really.

* By: Jenee Desmond-Harris | Posted: June 21, 2011

According to Foreign Policy's Charles Kenny, citizens of the
Democratic Republic of the Congo believe there's hope for their
war-torn country. And, despite the fact that it's struggling
economically and has been declared the second worst place in the world
to be a woman, their optimism is starting to be reflected in health
and education outcomes:
http://www.theroot.com/buzz/good-news-congo-really
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After the Asian tigers, will it be the turn of the African lions?
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INTERNATIONAL. Sub-Saharan Africa is likely to remain the second-fastest growing region after Asia in the near future, predicts Sanusi Lamido Sanusi, governor, Central Bank of Nigeria, but “we can catch up with Asia, as the prospect of Africa as the last unexplored territory in the world and the potential of growth remain.”

For this to happen, Sanusi says Africa needs to put in place the right policies, address its infrastructure deficit, and provide the right environment and incentives for businesses and capital to come in. “That includes policy consistency, political stability, the fight against corruption, and improved efficiency in business processes. If we did the same thing that the Asians, such as the Indonesians and the Malaysians, did and if we did it right, we should be able to repeat the experience.”

Raadiya Begg, director of INSEAD Africa Initiative, says exciting developments are taking place in Africa. Out of an increasing number of opportunities for investment in a variety of sectors, there is a focus on growth sectors related to development such as healthcare, alternative energy, logistics, finance, agriculture, technology and telecommunications.

“Take wireless telecommunications, for example. Mobile telecommunications has levelled the economic landscape, and led to the rapid growth of mobile banking and internet usage,” says Begg. “Improved access to information has had profound economic impacts such as more highly competitive pricing – farmers, for instance, are now able to access real-time prices of goods to make informed decisions on whether to participate in a trade; increased worker productivity; and business models geared towards the less wealthy segments of the population.”

Another area of development is in venture capital. “The viability of small and medium enterprises (SMEs) is essential to the health of any economy and the frontier markets are no exception,” argues Begg. “It is the growing entrepreneurial companies that create a multiplier effect.

It is not possible to create sustainable business with microfinance alone. Due to a virtual absence of capital, an equity base in the capital structure, which is almost non-existent in the developing world, is required. Thus, to achieve real impact on societies, expanding venture capital opportunities is a very practical approach.”
http://www.bi-me.com/main.php?id=49101&t=1&c=62&cg=4&mset=
 
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May 2013
1,097
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Lets' start over.
Here some progress africa today is making,with the west and china,and without them.
Some of the info is repeated but just read on to you get to new info below.




[QB] intra-african trade increasing/Africa’s hopeful economies/Africa's Blossoming Middle Class


Friends and neighbours
Even if many of the world’s most inept states can still be found
between the Sahara and Kalahari deserts, governance has improved
markedly in many places. Regulatory reforms have partially unshackled
markets. A string of privatisations (more than 100 in Nigeria alone)
has reduced the role of the state in many countries. In Nigeria,
Africa’s biggest resource economy, the much-expanded service sector,
if taken together with agriculture, now almost matches oil output.

Trade barriers have been reduced, at least a bit, and despite the
dearth of good roads, regional trade—long an African weakness—is
picking up. By some measures, intra-African trade has gone from 6% to
13% of the total volume. Some economists think the post-apartheid
reintegration of South Africa on its own has provided an extra 1% in
annual GDP growth for the continent, and will continue to do so for
some time. It is now the biggest source of foreign investment for
other countries south of the Sahara.

Somewhat belatedly, Africans are taking an interest in each other.
Flight connections are improving, even if an Arab city, Dubai, is
still the best hub for African travellers. Blocks of African economies
have taken steps towards integration. The East African Community,
which launched a common market in 2010, is doing well; the Economic
Community of West African States less so. The Southern African
Development Community has made the movement of goods and people across
borders much easier. That said, barriers remain, and the economy
suffers as a result. Africans pay twice as much for washing powder as
consumers in Asia, where trade and transport are easier and cheaper.

Africa is still not entirely peaceful and democratic. But it has made
huge strides. The dead hand of the Soviet Union is gone; countries
such as Mozambique and Ethiopia have given up on Marxism. The
dictators, such as Congo’s leopard-skin-fez-wearing Mobutu Sese Seko,
that superpowers once propped up have fallen. Civil wars like the one
which crippled Angola have mostly ended. Two out of three African
countries now hold elections, though they are not always free and
fair. Congo held one on November 28th.
Brain gain: Skilled diaspora return to Africa [/QB][/quote]

http://www.africagoodnews.com/africa...dle-class.html
 
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[FONT=Verdana, Arial]Portuguese people are even moving to Angola

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[FONT=Verdana, Arial] http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e-kSt-5ip94&feature=player_embedded[/FONT]
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[FONT=Verdana, Arial][FONT=Verdana, Arial] http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z0UMb4F8tSE[/FONT]

[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4N0K6J20Tuo"]Angolans invest in Portugal's sinking banks - YouTube[/ame]

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Has Africa's manufacturing revolution started?
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[FONT=Verdana, Arial]While most developing regions were laying the foundations of a manufacturing-driven economy, Africa continued to rely on the export of low-value raw materials. But it now seems that the trend is changing and local value addition is increasing - from cutting and polishing diamonds to exporting finished manufactured products. Sarah Rundell reports.
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http://business.highbeam.com/5626/article-1G1-221336360/has-africa-manufacturing-revolution-started-while-most
 
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How Africa is Becoming the New Asia
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[FONT=Verdana, Arial]February 19, 2010[/FONT]
[FONT=Verdana, Arial]China and India get all the headlines for their economic prowess, but there's another global growth story that is easily overlooked: Africa. In 2007 and 2008, southern Africa, the Great Lakes region of Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda, and even the drought-stricken Horn of Africa had GDP growth rates on par with Asia's two powerhouses. Last year, in the depths of global recession, the continent clocked almost 2 percent growth, roughly equal to the rates in the Middle East, and outperforming everywhere else but India and China. This year and in 2011, Africa will grow by 4.8 percent—the highest rate of growth outside Asia, and higher than even the oft-buzzed-about economies of Brazil, Russia, Mexico, and Eastern Europe, according to newly revised IMF estimates. In fact, on a per capita basis, Africans are already richer than Indians, and a dozen African states have higher gross national income per capita than China.
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[FONT=Verdana, Arial]http://www.newsweek.com/2010/02/18/h...-new-asia.html[/FONT]
 
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[FONT=Verdana, Arial]Here some more good news from angola.[/FONT]
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Angola Achieves Millennium Development Goals By Reducing Mal Nutrition
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[FONT=Verdana, Arial]Luanda — Angola reached in 2012 the Millennium Development Goal set for 2015, by reducing at more than 50 per cent of mal-nutrition case in the period between 1990 and 2012.[/FONT]
[FONT=Verdana, Arial]This was said on Tuesday by FAO official, Mamadou Diallo, when speaking at the opening act of a workshop dubbed "Urban and peri-urban vegetable plotting to reduce poverty and malnutrition in Angola".[/FONT]

[FONT=Verdana, Arial]On the occasion, Mamadou Diallo acknowledges that the Angolan government has been working hard and as result the country has achieved various social, economic and environmental progresses over the last years.[/FONT]

[FONT=Verdana, Arial][FONT=Verdana, Arial]"FAO is proud of accompanying Angola in this battle and is convinced that this African country will reach in a sustainable way all the Millennium Development Goals", he said.
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[FONT=Verdana, Arial]allAfrica.com: Angola Achieves Millennium Development Goals By Reducing Mal Nutrition[/FONT]

[FONT=Verdana, Arial]and[/FONT]
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[FONT=Verdana, Arial][FONT=Verdana, Arial][FONT=Verdana, Arial]Angola : Poverty level nearly halved in a decade[/FONT]
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On Wednesday 20 October the UN's Resident Coordinator in Angola, Koen Vanormelingen, said that poverty levels in Angola have dropped from 63% percent in 2002 to 38% in 2009, and noted other advances in living standards.
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[FONT=Verdana, Arial][FONT=Verdana, Arial][FONT=Verdana, Arial][FONT=Verdana, Arial][FONT=Verdana, Arial]Among the other advances in Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) highlighted by Vanormelingen are increased primary schooling and the expansion of a national health network. In a previous report in June the UN gave some other impressive figures: malnutrition dropped from 35% in 2002 to 23% in 2010, school enrolment has surged to 76%, gender parity is close to being achieved in schools, with 98 girls for every 100 boys (although low pass-through rates mean that education is still a priority), infant mortality is down nearly 20% and the proportion of child deaths from malaria has fallen. The UN sees progress on five (of eight) MDGs: malnutrition, education, gender balance, child survival and malaria, and HIV/AIDS.
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[FONT=Verdana, Arial]quote-[/FONT]
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On the one hand, he proclaimed: “Today we are witnessing a unique convergence of potentially positive developments in the fight against corruption – one that has not existed since the end of the Cold War”. Yet at the same time he also emphasised that we are still facing “the continuing reality of systemised corruption”.[/FONT]
[FONT=Verdana, Arial]Indeed corruption is a major problem which continues to undermine institutions, economies and societies – not least in Africa. In TI’s Corruption Perceptions Index 2012, 90% of African countries scored below 50, (0 being “highly corrupt”, and 100 representing a lack of corruption) and Somalia was deemed to be the worst offending African country with a score of just 8, joint with Afghanistan and North Korea.
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[FONT=Verdana, Arial]to read more[/FONT]

[FONT=Verdana, Arial]Corruption in Africa: It Takes Two to Tango | Think Africa Press [/FONT]

[FONT=Verdana, Arial]__________________________________________________[/FONT]

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Botswana less corrupt, Nigeria worst in Africa[/FONT]
[FONT=Verdana, Arial]afrol News, 20 October - In the annual corruption index, presented today by Transparency International (TI), Botswana again was named Africa's by far less corrupt country. Nigeria was found at the bottom end, close after Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, Congo Kinshasa, Angola, Kenya and Cameroon. The world's "cleanest" country was found to be Finland, while the most corrupt was Haiti.
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http://afrol.com/articles/14602

[FONT=Verdana, Arial]I posted info that has good news above with the bad,and alot of the info i posted before had good news with bad news,if folks read them carefully.[/FONT]

[FONT=Verdana, Arial]The news about africa was not all just good news.[/FONT]

[FONT=Verdana, Arial]The news however i posted tend to have more good news then bad,so i don't ignore the bad,just the outdated or incorrect info i dismiss and say the info is wrong and not correct.[/FONT]





[FONT=Verdana, Arial]Human Development Index in africa has whole has improve by the way since the 1980's and 1990's.[/FONT]
[FONT=Verdana, Arial]There has been a steady improvement,overall not has fast has we like but if you compare overall standards of living 20 years and now,africa has made progress.[/FONT]

[FONT=Verdana, Arial]That bit of info should not be ignored.[/FONT]
[FONT=Verdana, Arial]Africans are wealthier today then they were 10 years ago.[/FONT]

[FONT=Verdana, Arial]Progress has taken place.[/FONT]


 
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Apr 2013
222
Denmark.
I think Africa isn't as evolved as the rest of the world because we don't allow them to. If the population of whole Africa would have the same living standards, same technology, we wouldn't be able to live the way we do. Why? Well, you know that an average person uses about 1-3 worlds in resources? Imagine the millions of people in Africa also using 1-3 worlds in resources. . The good earth isn't that rich. And can't provide for them if we greedy folk is supposed to live like we do. That's just what I think, though. I don't see Africa evolving much politically either. Also, Africas riches is its curse and we aiding them dosen't matter or make a difference.
Evil, right?
 
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