Africa walking behind on development.

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Zeno

Ad Honoris
Jan 2010
13,691
♪♬ ♫♪♩
I think Africa isn't as evolved as the rest of the world because we don't allow them to. If the population of whole Africa would have the same living standards, same technology, we wouldn't be able to live the way we do. Why? Well, you know that an average person uses about 1-3 worlds in resources? Imagine the millions of people in Africa also using 1-3 worlds in resources. . The good earth isn't that rich. And can't provide for them if we greedy folk is supposed to live like we do. That's just what I think, though. I don't see Africa evolving much politically either. Also, Africas riches is its curse and we aiding them dosen't matter or make a difference.
Evil, right?
It's the way it is. But let's not call it evil, because then the right thing to do would be to take action and pay fair prices (prices as if there's only one earth) to the African warlords in power and that would be shooting in my own foot because i-pads make me happy.
 

Underlankers

Ad Honorem
Feb 2013
6,724
There were several African Empires on the scale of other parts of the world. Colonialism destroyed most of them by using machine guns on them. As to why Africa hasn't developed as much as the rest of the world, well, there's that whole factor of colonialism and its lethal nature (in cases like the Belgian Congo there were more black Africans killed than Jews killed by Hitler by a margin of 2 million :sad:). Then there's the devastation of the Wars of National Liberation phase, and then there's the whole US-Soviet proxy war phase that perpetuated both of the other phases. Much as it might surprise latter-day Social Darwinists, war is a bad thing for economic development.
 
May 2013
1,097
SOMEWHERE
[FONT=Verdana, Arial]I try not give info from the Christian Science Monitor because it's biases and at times had wrong info about africa in the past from what i have read, but here good info from them about brain gain.[/FONT]


[FONT=Verdana, Arial]
Reverse brain drain: 'African Lion' economies vs West’s fast track[/FONT]
[FONT=Verdana, Arial]One Kenyan – like tens of thousands of fellow Africans in a new reverse brain drain – leaves a career in a foreign country for a sunny future back home. Developing nations are experiencing a 'brain gain' as the global recession makes their best and brightest see opportunity in places they once fled.[/FONT]

[FONT=Verdana, Arial]By Mike Pflanz, Correspondent / October 21, 2012[/FONT]



[FONT=Verdana, Arial]
[/FONT]
[FONT=Verdana, Arial]Sitati Kituyi, a Kenyan computer software developer, in his office in Nairobi, where he works after leaving a career in Britain to return home earlier in 2012. This is part of the "Great Brain Gain" cover-story project in the Oct. 22 issue of The Christian Science MonitorWeekly magazine. [/FONT]

[FONT=Verdana, Arial]Mike Pflanz[/FONT]


[FONT=Verdana, Arial]By all measures, the Kenyan was on what he describes as "a set path" to success. The computer-engineering graduate from the University of Manchester, in northern England, had left his family when he was 18 to seek training and the career he'd always dreamed about in the West. Within 18 months of leaving university, he was on the fast track to a position as a senior analyst in a respected information technology consultancy with a clutch of blue-chip clients.[/FONT]

[FONT=Verdana, Arial]But then one day late last year, he realized that wasn't the path he wanted. Sure, he missed his family, and his girlfriend, and the energy of Nairobi, his home city on the plains beneath the endless skies. But more than that, he had the nagging feeling that he was missing out; that back in Kenya, classmates and peers were forging ahead, running their own firms by their mid-20s, making money, breaking new ground with the new tech tools just seeping into Nairobi's nascent information technology industry.
[/FONT]
[FONT=Verdana, Arial]Reverse brain drain: 'African Lion' economies vs West?s fast track - CSMonitor.com [/FONT]
 
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Underlankers

Ad Honorem
Feb 2013
6,724
Most of the Empires you just mentioned were in North-Africa, or in the wake of its influence. But why has there never been something like the Roman Empire, The Arab Caliphate, Russian Empire or the Ottoman Empire. Something far stretching and an empire that contributed greatly to science, astrology, mathematics, etc. It seems that almost every continent of the world had multiple of these extravagant empires that stretched beyond 1 continent and contributed greatly to humanity except for Africa. (with as exception to North-Africa)
Ah, no. The first two are in the Horn of Africa and Ethiopia, which is East Africa, not North Africa, and Mali and Songhai were located in West Africa. Try cracking a book on geography. Your analogies are all also flawed. Rome and the Caliphate were societies of the ancient world, the Ottoman and Russian Empires of the modern world. So are you asking why Africa did not produce Classical Empires or modern imperial juggernauts that rape, loot, and pillage their way to prosperity? Also, Antarctica, Australia, and North America never had those empires.

That's true but they eventually got them. Do you think Africa will rise to become a continent of development, the number 1 continent, it seems every continent had it's share of greatness except Africa, well the exception was a Moorish empire in Morocco and Spain of which Cordoba was capital and at the time the worlds cultural center.
Africa had its shares of greatness, too. Thing is that Africa's been on the receiving end of conquest since the 1880s, and has been witnessing a continental-scale war nobody cares about because it doesn't involve white people. A World War I-scale conflict with shades of the Thirty Years' War would only be not-news if it happened in Africa.
 
May 2013
1,097
SOMEWHERE
Military history of Africa
Military history of Africa


Tapestry of the Battle of Adwa between Ethiopia and Italy






Somali soldiers engage their British counterparts at sea.



The Ethiopian military leader Ras Mengesha Yohannes on horseback.



Military company of Ebolowa, Colonial German Cameroon, c. 1894/1915.


Hittite chariot (drawing of an Egyptian relief)


British tanks and crews line up on Tripoli's waterfront after capturing the city during World War II - 1942


The Algerine, an Algerian battle ship manufactured in the port of Jijel during the Barbary corsairs era


A sketch of the Zulu leader King Shaka (1781 - 1828) from 1824
http://rapidttp.com/milhist/vol103aw.html.



Moderator edit - copyrighted material removed
 
May 2013
1,097
SOMEWHERE




The Mino were recruited from among the ahosi ("king's wives") of which there were often hundreds. Some women in Fon society became ahosi voluntarily, while others were involuntarily enrolled if their husbands or fathers complained to the King about their behaviour. Membership among the Mino was supposed to hone any aggressive character traits for the purpose of war. During their membership they were not allowed to have children or be part of married life. Many of them were virgins. The regiment had a semi-sacred status, which was intertwined with the Fon belief in Vodun.
The Mino trained with intense physical exercise. Discipline was emphasised.
In the latter period, they were armed with Winchester rifles, clubs and knives. Units were under female command. Captives who fell into the hands of the Amazons were often decapitated.

European encroachment into west Africa gained pace during the latter half of the 19th century, and in 1890 King Behanzin started fighting French forces in the course of the First Franco-Dahomean War. According to Holmes, many of the French soldiers fighting in Dahomey hesitated before shooting or bayoneting the Mino. The resulting delay led to many of the French casualties.
However, according to at least two easily-identifiable sources, the French army lost several battles to them—not because of French "hesitation," but due to the female warriors' skill in battle that was "the equal of every contemporary body of male elite soldiers from among the colonial powers"
Ultimately, bolstered by the Foreign Legion, and armed with superior weaponry, including machine guns, as well as cavalry and Marine infantry, the French inflicted casualties that were ten times worse on the Dahomey side. After several battles, the French prevailed. The Legionnaires later wrote about the "incredible courage and audacity" of the Amazons. The last surviving Amazon of Dahomey died in 1979.
 
May 2013
1,097
SOMEWHERE
martial arts & africa/mashufaa:spirt of a warrior



All different people throughout the world have felt the need to express themselves through song,
The Nile Valley in Africa became the cradle of civilisation, with a culture that had emerged from the south i.e. Ancient Nubia (Ethiopia/Sudan and Tanzania/Uganda).


With the image that is now shown to us about Africa, it is hard for some
people to believe that the first Martial Arts started there. But history
has shown that along with advances in agriculture, science and technology,
in Nubia and Kemet (Egypt) some of the first and most advanced fighting systems were created.

Some of these early systems like Nubian wrestling can be seen in images on the pyramids and
show the prototypes of throws, punches and kicks. In these schools,
warriors and the aristocracy were taught through a regimented system of
discipline. This was later incorporated into the Mystery system and
Egyptian Priests learnt this as part of their spiritual duties, just like
Shaolin monks do today.

These fighting systems later went to India and then China, becoming Tai
Chi, Kung fu and in Thailand Muay Boran (Thai Boxing). The Japanese adopted
the techniques from the Chinese and created a system designed for combat
called Ju Jitsu and Judo emerged from this. Other arts were created like
Kendo and Wada Ryu based upon, in some cases the personal preferences of
particular masters. In Japan arts like Karate and Tae Kwon Do developed
from truncated elements of Ju Jitsu and Kung Fu.

Now there are many different styles of martial arts. There is Jeet Kune do,
developed under Bruce Lee. It is an amalgamation of the techniques of Wing
Chung mixed with Judo and Kickboxing. There is Ninjitsu, Pent Jak Silat and
Escrima, Aikido, kobudo Aido, Kazimba Yoruba wrestling and there are styles
like Capoeira. African slaves in Brazil as a means of self-defense
developed Capoeira. Then there is Kickboxing, developed by Americans
soldiers studying Japanese Tae Kwon Do and Muay Thai during the Second
World War.

At Mashufaa we have researched the ancient traditions and the African root
of Martial Arts but we have also incorporated what works from other
systems. Mashufaa is formal but not rigid and we celebrate those who have
trained in different styles.
MASHUFAA :: SPIRIT OF A WARRIOR
 
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