Africans Invented steel

Aug 2014
3,611
Australia
#41
Why do people always get jelly at the slightest suggestion of advanced Sub-Saharan non-Muslim African civilisations?
There were plenty of advanced Sub-Saharan civiisations. If someone wants to claim that they did something before another part of the world, we need actual evidence to back it up.
 
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Apr 2017
285
Northern lands
#42
East Asians and Siberians are relatively hairless like Africans. Look like Africans in basic facial profile. They were the first to live in the Siberian tundras. Also, the first to reach Madagascar, the Americas, Polynesia. Ergo we know these groups were the most technologically advanced in ancient times. Furthermore, its not possible that they were from southeast Asia or India because there was another group that is very different from East Asians already living there. Its only possible that they came from Africa. So there, the proof of an far more advanced African culture.

How much more advanced is, they were probably seafarers with large sailing ships and master woodworkers. Hence why the East Asians build everything out of wood and lack a sophisticated stoneworking tradition. Hence the connection with Atlantis, which was known for ocean-going ships if taken literally.
 
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Naima

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
2,321
Venice
#44
Southern Africa is at the climatic equivalent of Sumeria, Greece, India, and China. There was an ancient civilization there, that was beyond all the rest in terms of age and advancement. Africa is the cradle after all. It makes sense that it was the most advanced. It might have even been the Atlantis or Lemuria of legends.

Somehow it got destroyed by invaders. With the invaders adopting the technology and its techniques but having no ability to advance it further. This is where we get the steel making techniques in that tribe.

The region today is known for a higher average birth incidence of albinism. And its brutal treatment of albinos based on superstitions, that is ancient and directly linked to the destruction of the advanced culture in southern Africa.

This was the mother culture of East Asians, that got destroyed by invaders. They were massacred by the blacks and their body parts turned into lucky charms. Some escaped by sailing ship and restarted their civilization in East Asia. This is why the metalworking in China was so advanced. East Asians are about 90% African in appearance, sans black skin and curly hair. But they are mixed with other natives of East Asia like the Ainu (Who were also generally dark skinned).

East Asians were light skinned Africans who got massacred and had to escape to East Asia using sailing ships that were unheard of in the rest of the world. They were not albinos. The higher albinism in southern Africa is because there is a hatred that is imprinted like a curse inside them. Hatred is a dark emotion. Its better to think the civilization sank into the sea rather than the people chopped up and became the lucky charms of the invading blacks.
Sorry , are you serious or is this a ffringe theory of some kind?
 
Aug 2014
3,611
Australia
#46
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Apr 2017
616
Lemuria
#47
Weren't the celts using crap metal swords that blended swords on field?

No the Celts had really advanced ferrous metallurgy, more so than the Romans. The average Celt had poor quality weapon though. They usually passed their spear from one generation to another. So the spearhead got smaller and smaller. The Celts weren't primitive at all (tribal but not primitive); certainly they were more advanced than the Germanics. In regions like Gaul (The Britons were more primitive) they had very nice and well organized villages that were clean and very livable.
 
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Mar 2012
2,289
#48
Weren't the celts using crap metal swords that blended swords on field?
This story comes from Polybius. No other Roman author that I have read or know of has corroborated it. Doesn't mean it was not true to one degree or another, perhaps for a certain Gallic opponent, but it has the ring of an invention or dramatic overstatement.
 

Bart Dale

Ad Honorem
Dec 2009
6,878
#49
There were some stories about Celts having to straighten out their swords after becoming bent in battle, indicating their iron swords were soft. Some think tales like this may have been essentially propoganda by Roman writers, since tne Celts also had the reputation for making good swords too.

But perhaps the conflict between tne two stories abiut the quality of Celtic swords was a matter of time - perhaps the quality of Celtic swords improved over time, starting off with soft wrougnt iron swords, and later learning to add carbon and heat treat and cool them to make good steel swords. The Celts were accomplished iron workers, and no reason to assume their technology remained stagnant.

Or it could be that the Celts tnat Polybius talked about just got a bad batch of swords. Analysis of medieval swords reveal a great range in quality, some were essentially wrought iron, and others like the Uthbrecht swords, as hard as a katana. Even Roman iron swords exhibit a wide range of properties. It isn't until the later middle ages you start seeing swords witn mostly consistent metal properties
 
Aug 2014
3,611
Australia
#50
There were some stories about Celts having to straighten out their swords after becoming bent in battle, indicating their iron swords were soft. Some think tales like this may have been essentially propoganda by Roman writers, since tne Celts also had the reputation for making good swords too.

But perhaps the conflict between tne two stories abiut the quality of Celtic swords was a matter of time - perhaps the quality of Celtic swords improved over time, starting off with soft wrougnt iron swords, and later learning to add carbon and heat treat and cool them to make good steel swords. The Celts were accomplished iron workers, and no reason to assume their technology remained stagnant.

Or it could be that the Celts tnat Polybius talked about just got a bad batch of swords. Analysis of medieval swords reveal a great range in quality, some were essentially wrought iron, and others like the Uthbrecht swords, as hard as a katana. Even Roman iron swords exhibit a wide range of properties. It isn't until the later middle ages you start seeing swords witn mostly consistent metal properties
All of this in in Pleiner's book. He analyses a large sample of Celtic swords. Some were good, some were crap. The good ones were very good. The crap ones were just as bad as everyone else's.
 
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