After a German WWI victory, the United Baltic Duchy adopts an "open borders" policy for Europeans other than Russians

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
20,996
SoCal
#21
Well did they? I mean you brought them up so I assume you know?
Well, the Masurians overwhelmingly (by something like a 96% margin) voted for Germany in a 1920 referendum to determine Masuria's future status, so one would think that they strongly preferred German rule to Polish rule. The Memelland didn't actually hold a plebiscite but given its relative reluctance to vote for ethnic parties in the pre-WWI era, Germany might have had a decent chance of winning a plebiscite there as well were one actually held there after WWI.
 
Sep 2019
37
Canada
#22
What if Germany would have won WWI (this would have to be done through US neutrality in WWI due to no resumption of USW; however, if that's not enough, one is probably going to have to figure out a way for Germany to quickly win in the West in 1914) and the United Baltic Duchy that it would have created in Latvia plus Estonia afterwards (with a German King, presumably) would have adopted an "open borders" policy for Europeans other than Russians (who would have been perceived as a security risk) over the last 100 years? (I suppose that Middle Eastern Christians could also be allowed to immigrate to the United Baltic Duchy.) Basically, think of the US's "open borders" policy towards Europeans until 1917. The logic behind such an "open borders" policy would be similar in both cases--as in, the need to get more people to settle there in order to make good use of more of the land there as well as to become stronger as a nation.

Anyway, just how many Europeans would have actually moved to and permanently settled in the United Baltic Duchy over the last 100 years in such a scenario? Also, which countries would most of them have come from? In addition, what effects would this immigration have on the United Baltic Duchy, its culture, its economy, its cities, its politics, et cetera?
Depends. If we can assume that another world war, at any point with any nation being the belligerent, would never come about after Germany's victory, I would most likely say that they would have had low immigration numbers. People tended to go the other way (West), and not further towards Russia and Slavendom. Perhaps if it somehow became quickly industrialized and stabilized (especially with concerns, of what I would be assuming, is their aggressive neighbor, Russia), then it could have seen some numbers, buts its unlikely it would have "boomed" in my opinion.
 
Likes: Futurist

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
20,996
SoCal
#23
Depends. If we can assume that another world war, at any point with any nation being the belligerent, would never come about after Germany's victory, I would most likely say that they would have had low immigration numbers. People tended to go the other way (West), and not further towards Russia and Slavendom. Perhaps if it somehow became quickly industrialized and stabilized (especially with concerns, of what I would be assuming, is their aggressive neighbor, Russia), then it could have seen some numbers, buts its unlikely it would have "boomed" in my opinion.
Interesting. Do you know if the Slavs who settled in the Baltics after 1945 in real life were generally voluntary migrants or forced migrants?