Akhenaten (Box, Carter Archive 001K)

Corvidius

Ad Honorem
Jul 2017
2,555
Crows nest
Further on the bricks. I would contend that the bricks found in KV55 had zero ritual significance, as, IMO, the bricks themselves, though having the text and the name of the person to be protected, cannot work without the object, djed pillar or god, that should be with it. The djed pillar and the images of gods on the bricks in KV62 were all wrapped, this indicates that they were significant and not mere amulets as these items are usually described. This is an historical legacy from the opening of KV62 when the wrappings around the two guardian statues and a number of images of gods, including the bricks, were discarded as being nothing more than wrapping in our modern sense. That a mummy is wrapped when it actually has no reason to be, it is well protected in it's coffin and sarcophagus, should have caused some thought to be put into why the Egyptians had this "mania" for wrapping things, but no, at least not then, and to an extent not now either.
 
Likes: Ayrton

AlpinLuke

Ad Honoris
Oct 2011
25,610
Italy, Lago Maggiore
Further on the bricks. I would contend that the bricks found in KV55 had zero ritual significance, as, IMO, the bricks themselves, though having the text and the name of the person to be protected, cannot work without the object, djed pillar or god, that should be with it. The djed pillar and the images of gods on the bricks in KV62 were all wrapped, this indicates that they were significant and not mere amulets as these items are usually described. This is an historical legacy from the opening of KV62 when the wrappings around the two guardian statues and a number of images of gods, including the bricks, were discarded as being nothing more than wrapping in our modern sense. That a mummy is wrapped when it actually has no reason to be, it is well protected in it's coffin and sarcophagus, should have caused some thought to be put into why the Egyptians had this "mania" for wrapping things, but no, at least not then, and to an extent not now either.
Well, they were in an emergency situation. And actually not a few other important "items" were missing in that occasional burial site. May be they reduced to the essential what they put there [or may be that was all what they were able to recover and to realize in clandestinity ...]. There are several possibilities to explain the lack of liturgical accuracy. It may also remind the behavior of Catholic believers who put crosses here and there without actually following the canon of the Church [the cross "works" and that's enough for them].

Anyway yes, there is the possibility that the bricks were "memorabilia".
 
Likes: Ayrton

Corvidius

Ad Honorem
Jul 2017
2,555
Crows nest
Without the images, the bricks loose any significance for burial, and become similar to the bricks used in protective magic for childbirth, the opposite of death. I doubt this was the intention, and what happened was that the magic was broken by removing the images from the bricks as well as the names, on at least on two of them.

The more important issue is the fully Osirian nature of these bricks, and why are they associated with Akhenaten. There is nothing Osirian at TA26 as he had discarded the entire system. So even a diminished and then desecrated burial with Osirian items makes no sense. It makes no sense for it to be his wishes for this as there is no sign that he was rowing back on anything, in fact the opposite. Then, if it was the intention to "annoy" his ba by placing Osirian items with his name on them in his second burial, why then make them useless in their magical function, as his ba would not give a damn as he had rejected this anyway.

If we look as well at the shrines in KV62, they are just as, if not more odd. It's not just that they are assembled in a way that negates the magic, but how this came about. Yes, great haste, why?. The shrines contain the earliest known record of the Book of the Heavenly Cow in a complete text, and not snipits existing from the time of the Pyramid Texts, and that of the Enigmatic Book of the Netherworld. To take the step of introducing new texts [spells] is important, so you would think that they would have taken some care, but no, just thrown together. If you do this it's pointless erecting the shrines, or putting magic bricks in KV55 if they have no magic value, they would have saved time by not bothering in the first place.
 
Likes: Ayrton

AlpinLuke

Ad Honoris
Oct 2011
25,610
Italy, Lago Maggiore
Without the images, the bricks loose any significance for burial, and become similar to the bricks used in protective magic for childbirth, the opposite of death. I doubt this was the intention, and what happened was that the magic was broken by removing the images from the bricks as well as the names, on at least on two of them.

The more important issue is the fully Osirian nature of these bricks, and why are they associated with Akhenaten. There is nothing Osirian at TA26 as he had discarded the entire system. So even a diminished and then desecrated burial with Osirian items makes no sense. It makes no sense for it to be his wishes for this as there is no sign that he was rowing back on anything, in fact the opposite. Then, if it was the intention to "annoy" his ba by placing Osirian items with his name on them in his second burial, why then make them useless in their magical function, as his ba would not give a damn as he had rejected this anyway.

If we look as well at the shrines in KV62, they are just as, if not more odd. It's not just that they are assembled in a way that negates the magic, but how this came about. Yes, great haste, why?. The shrines contain the earliest known record of the Book of the Heavenly Cow in a complete text, and not snipits existing from the time of the Pyramid Texts, and that of the Enigmatic Book of the Netherworld. To take the step of introducing new texts [spells] is important, so you would think that they would have taken some care, but no, just thrown together. If you do this it's pointless erecting the shrines, or putting magic bricks in KV55 if they have no magic value, they would have saved time by not bothering in the first place.
Corvidius, my instinct of investigator [which can values less than a nut!] makes me think to a relative, probably a daughter, who was enough known and important to find someone to help her to do something for the mummy of her father.

When Akhetaten fell and the destruction of the memory of Akhenaten and Atenism begun ... Akhenaten's daughters were still there. May be Tut was still too young to have a say, but Meritaten and Ankhesenpaaten were enough adult to have a "lobby". But sure they had no possibility to obtain aid from the returning traditional clergies [reality is that they probably saw, in Akhetaten, Atenist priests passing to the traditional side ... how to trust them about the mummy of the "enemy"? That is to say their father?].

KV55 is so odd that at first sight it looks ... fake. Egyptians offered fake "targets" to robbers ... but in this case it's not fake ... it's a mess.
 
Likes: Ayrton
Mar 2019
97
Peterborough, Ontario Canada
Reeves talks about the direction of the bricks ... it would be interesting to find out if here we are not dealing with an other typical Reeves' excess of optimism [like about Tut's mask ...].
Recently, I came across a reference to a talk by Reeves concerning Tut’s golden throne and his theory that it first belonged to Akhenaten, then to Nefertiti as Pharaoh, and then to Tut. Yet I haven’t been able to track the original paper down. Has anyone come across that paper? I’m familiar with most of Reeves’ writings but not to one with the golden throne in the title.
Magic bricks in connection with KV55 and KV62 specifically.

These bricks are inscribed with parts of spell 151, a spell of protection. Given the texts of the spell, the bricks should be seen as associated with the four gods we see wrapped and in a shrine in KV62. These gods being Duamutef, Kebehsenuf, Sekhmet and Geb. However, spell 151 mentions more gods, or objects, than these, and it is these that we see on the bricks, literally on the bricks as the bricks are the bases for the images, and the text is on the bases. In KV62 we have all four gods already mentioned, and on the bricks we have, Anubis, Osiris, a Djed pillar and a figure usually described as shabti type, but could possibly be Geb without a ritual beard. All these objects, the statues and the bricks, are fully Osirian. So, despite the name of Ankhenaten being on two of the KV55 bricks, as he abolished Osiris and even the Duat, it's hard to understand why he has these bricks. As far as can be made out, no such objects existed in TA26, nor niches for them, though the tomb is too badly damaged to come to conclusions. That we have four bricks in KV55 and two are named for Ankhenaten is a reasonable bet that the other two were also, but that cannot be taken for granted. If another name were ever found, then it would make it all just a bit more complicated, maybe.

Going by KV62, the bricks do not, it seems, have to be precisely at the cardinal points, as can be seen in the top image. A caveat is that this tomb was unfinished and rushed, even as regards the magical/ritual construction of the shrines over the sarcophagus. They are so badly ordered in the way they were put together that they had lost any magical properties. This is important to them, so if they were a mess, we have to be cautious in saying that anything else in the tomb was as it should be for a royal burial, including the bricks and their placement.

The bottom image shows the placement of the KV55 bricks, all missing, as far as I can tell, the image of a god or object that should have been on top of them. Their placement is not too dissimilar to that of KV62, with three more or less along the south wall as opposed to three along the west wall of KV62. Though the tomb is badly damaged and was flooded, I would think that they are mostly not far out of position, even the the one under the bier which may have been dislodged from the east wall.

Spell 151 for reference Book of the dead chapter 151

KV62


KV55
The same source that I posted the photos of the KV55 ‘north’ and ‘south’ bricks from, states that each appeared, “... to have a twig (now broken off) inserted to one end of the surface with inscriptions and that the northern brick may have also once served as the base for a small wooden statuette, judging from the impressions on the end opposite the twig hole.” (p. 171).
 
Likes: Ayrton
Mar 2019
97
Peterborough, Ontario Canada
Further on the bricks. I would contend that the bricks found in KV55 had zero ritual significance, as, IMO, the bricks themselves, though having the text and the name of the person to be protected, cannot work without the object, djed pillar or god, that should be with it. The djed pillar and the images of gods on the bricks in KV62 were all wrapped, this indicates that they were significant and not mere amulets as these items are usually described. This is an historical legacy from the opening of KV62 when the wrappings around the two guardian statues and a number of images of gods, including the bricks, were discarded as being nothing more than wrapping in our modern sense. That a mummy is wrapped when it actually has no reason to be, it is well protected in it's coffin and sarcophagus, should have caused some thought to be put into why the Egyptians had this "mania" for wrapping things, but no, at least not then, and to an extent not now either.
Sorry, I meant to post my last reply to this post—there seems to be indication on the two bricks naming Akhenaten that a statuette and perhaps another ritual object were indeed attached.
 
Likes: Ayrton
Mar 2019
97
Peterborough, Ontario Canada
Corvidius, my instinct of investigator [which can values less than a nut!] makes me think to a relative, probably a daughter, who was enough known and important to find someone to help her to do something for the mummy of her father.

When Akhetaten fell and the destruction of the memory of Akhenaten and Atenism begun ... Akhenaten's daughters were still there. May be Tut was still too young to have a say, but Meritaten and Ankhesenpaaten were enough adult to have a "lobby". But sure they had no possibility to obtain aid from the returning traditional clergies [reality is that they probably saw, in Akhetaten, Atenist priests passing to the traditional side ... how to trust them about the mummy of the "enemy"? That is to say their father?].

KV55 is so odd that at first sight it looks ... fake. Egyptians offered fake "targets" to robbers ... but in this case it's not fake ... it's a mess.
It does make you think of Antigone and her plight when her evil uncle (Ay) denies her relative a proper burial. I know that has been brought up before by the Russian scholar whose name I believe starts with a V but escapes me now...
 
Likes: Ayrton
Mar 2019
97
Peterborough, Ontario Canada
Likes: Ayrton
Mar 2019
97
Peterborough, Ontario Canada
This is quite a succinct summary of KV55 (same source as photos of bricks), with some photos not often seen in other publications.
 

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