Akhenaten (Box, Carter Archive 001K)

The problem is that the title relates to the role that the person performed more than who they were, which is why you had God's Fathers who were not related. I believe that with Yuya you have a probably rare situation, because of Amenhotep III's youth, where he was a mentor as well as a relative through marriage. As we now know, Yuya was probably an uncle of Amenhotep III as well. As such, following his father's premature death he may have been the closest adult male relative to the king.

Ay is different, he clearly aligns himself with Nefertiti rather than Akhenaten. Unlike Yuya he does not even in his own tomb make the relationship clear except to say that his wife was the queen's wetnurse. Potentially therefore he is no relation to the royal family at all. Yes he shares a lot of titles with Yuya but I would argue that is because of his actions rather than a family link. Why not name his familial relationship to Nefertiti if there was one? Could it be that Ay and Tey adopted Nefertiti and her sister?
 
Mar 2019
302
Ogden, Utah
And we've got already a problem, despite the presence of an inscription which is an autobiography, Ahmose Pen Nekhbet, father of Sathia, Great Royal Wife of Thutmose III, wasn't a "God's Father". At least I cannot detect that title.
I wrote a book called "The Pharaoh's Barber". It's a mystery in which Satiah is murdered and the barber of Thutmose III, a Canaanite, helps with the investigation. Naturally, I did research on Satiah, but I didn't come across anything that suggested her father was Ahmose Pen Nekhbet. There was only that her mother, Ipu, had been a nurse of Thutmose. So I don't think there is much certainty that this woman is the same Ipu who was the wife of Ahmose. This is all I've been able to come up with:

Pennechbet

"The nurse Ipw, mother of the ZAt-JaH Great Royal Wife to Thutmosis III, is testified only once on an offering table from Abydos (today in the museum of Cairo, CG 23034; Roehrig, in 1990). This offering table which was inscribed for her daughter mentions no other members of the family. Since the brother Chaemwese had been responsible for the burial of Ahmose-Pennechbet it is not very likely that Ahmose-Pennechbet had children (which lived long enough to crare for their father´s burial. Although they share the name it is very unlikely that the nurse Ipw is identical with the wife of Ahmose-Pennechbet."

Well, I wouldn't go so far as to say "very unlikely". I wrote my book some years ago and don't now remember why I had Satiah coming from the Fayyum and that she had a brother. But it doesn't seem to me I would have chosen the Fayyum for no reason.
 
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Mar 2019
302
Ogden, Utah
Ay is different, he clearly aligns himself with Nefertiti rather than Akhenaten. Unlike Yuya he does not even in his own tomb make the relationship clear except to say that his wife was the queen's wetnurse. Potentially therefore he is no relation to the royal family at all. Yes he shares a lot of titles with Yuya but I would argue that is because of his actions rather than a family link. Why not name his familial relationship to Nefertiti if there was one? Could it be that Ay and Tey adopted Nefertiti and her sister?
Everywhere we see her, Tey wears the same hairstyle of the other royal nurses shown at Amarna. It's main feature is a ribbon tying back the hair or wig. Unless Tey was also a nurse to the children of Nefertiti--then Nefertiti must have been a royal child. But no other nurseling is mentioned except "the goddess". who must be Nefertiti as, at the time of the decorating of the tomb of Ay and Tey [one of the earliest ones] she was the personification of the goddess Tefnut. I must say I have never heard of a member of the royal family who became a nurse, although these women were often honored by their royal charges. Unfortunately, "it nTr" remains a confusing term. I have kept an eye out for it for some time and it was held by plenty of men who were never suspected of being a king's father-in-law. I suspect it was no more than an honorary title. However, in ancient times, it would appear that if someone was considered a wise man, a sage, or even a prophet, even a king called him "father". This is proved in the Book of Kings where a ruler of a kingdom seeks out a prophet and calls him "my father"--although the man certainly was not his father. If I recall, the king was one of the sons of Ahab.

There is an item known as "Tey's sewing box" found at Tuna el Gebel [it is said] and in Berlin now. I am sure it must be a shabti box. It may not be known to everyone. I'll try to find a picture of it. So far I found only this:



Essays on ancient Egypt


Teynurse.jpg
 
Last edited:
Oct 2011
26,582
Italy, Lago Maggiore
Tey is really intriguing. I assumed she was Nefertiti's wetnurse, but does that mean she nursed Nefertiti, or was she actually the wetnurse for Nefertiti's children?
An other interesting question. From what we see in the inscriptions in Ay's tomb we get that Tey was Nefertiti's wetnurse. But this doesn't exclude she was the wetnurse of Nefertiti's daughters.

The first answer is that she was Nefertiti's wetnurse. This for accuracy.
 
Mar 2019
302
Ogden, Utah
An other interesting question. From what we see in the inscriptions in Ay's tomb we get that Tey was Nefertiti's wetnurse. But this doesn't exclude she was the wetnurse of Nefertiti's daughters.

The first answer is that she was Nefertiti's wetnurse. This for accuracy.
Right, but one can't be a wetnurse forever. One has to have a baby of ones own--or no milk. So, evidently, when Nefertiti was a baby, Tey had a child. Was it Mutbeneret? Who knows? But where are the subsequent children of Tey? When Nefertiti had her first daughter, I feel sure she was no more than a teenager. Really, for someone of 13 or 14 to have a child, while unusual now, was not at all unusual in centuries past. Also, women continued to have children until menopause because they lacked reliable birth control. I suspect that Mutbeneret was the milk sister of Nefertiti and belonged to Tey. But there is no way to prove it.
 
Jan 2017
4,246
Bendigo
Actually, I would like to know more about the occurrences of wetnurses in records. Do they come up much in inscriptions in reference to non-royals? Do wet-nurses turn up in inscriptions etc. in the tombs, for instance, of nobles in non-Royal connections? And why would Nefertiti be nursed by Tey with no direct clues records as to who she was, or who she was related to - other than Mutbenret as sister, or other relative; or even a friend from the nobility or milk-sister?

Rymerster’s suggestion that Ay is particularly connected with Nefertiti is something that I have long considered and touched on numerous times on this thread in one way or another.

Thuya and Yuya are particularly connected to Tiye, but also Sitamun - their eldest granddaughter?

Ay and Tey are particularly connected to Nefertiti, who does not appear to be related (at least closely; or obviously!) to them? Nefertiti appears from nowhere, though it seems very fair to say she was a baby in Egypt, so born there. If not a Royal, where was she plucked from to become Amenophis IV’s Wife? Highest Nobility, but not a Royal? With no parentage mentioned?

Edit: Not sure if I have posted this before. (Have it in my notes. Think it interesting). Is it germane?
The Milk Relationship: The Evolution and Significance of Wet-nurses. Natalie Rosen, University of Pennsylvania University. Spring 2013.
‘In Pharaonic Egypt, “the royal wet nurses were selected from the harem of senior officials of the royal palace and enjoyed a high status (Fildes 1998, p.3). Each royal infant had several wet nurses as it was a customary method of feeding for future leaders.”’
 
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Jan 2017
4,246
Bendigo
Another of my notes: (I stumbled on when looking for my Milk Relationship quote).

SWEET OF LOVE associations:
Bnrt-mrwt- Sweet of Love: Ankhsenamun; Nefertiti; Queen Tiaa; Mutbenret
Ndjmt- Sweet of Love: Ankhsenamun; Mutnodjmet.

This name/epithet struck me while poking around ages ago researching Mutbenret. Is ‘Sweet of love’ particularly associated with the royal family, I wonder?
 
Jan 2017
4,246
Bendigo
Regards the ‘God’s Father’ business popping up again.

See posts:
7823
7826.
7904.
8352
8356

This does not seem to mean just ‘Father in Law’; though it could, I guess, be one of its uses. I would not bet my house on a pure reading of ‘Father in Law’ without other evidence supporting it.
 
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Oct 2011
26,582
Italy, Lago Maggiore
About God's Father we've got a pivotal clue: if Satiath's father [that is to say the father of the first Great Royal Wife of Thutmose III] wasn't a "God's Father" it means that the title wasn't connected to family relations, but it was a honorific title of some kind.
 

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