Akhenaten influence on Monotheism/Abrahamic Faiths

Jan 2014
1,790
Portugal
A part that the first step would be to state the historical reality of Moses and the eventual provenience of proto Israeli monotheism from Egypt, and this is far to be proved ... [the only Mose who deserves to be mentioned in Egyptian history is an officer of Ramses II. See Mose stela, Hildesheim, Pelizaeus Museum, record 374].

Anyway the "monotheism" of Akhenaten was particular, it was an expression of superiority of a deity in the form of the solar disc [the Aten], its light was so important that the holy cores of the temples hadn't a roof, so that the solar light had the possibility to reach the believers.

About the potential influence of the "monotheism" on the proto Israeli one, there would be who could underline that proto Israeli religion wasn't that "monotheist" [there is who even sustains that it was quite polytheist and that Yawheh had a wife!].

But, in general I can see some "roots" of proto Israeli monotheism in Egypt. Akhenaten developed a system of beliefs and a religion which were a fertile field to cultivate any eventual monotheist cult [may be already existent].
Thank you, enlighted post!
Also TY Rob Banks, good post!

This post created a lot more discussion than I would think at first. It seems that political/religious beliefs can be a very tricky agent on the discussion.

About the contemporaneity of Akhenaton and David, I'm pretty sure that's not right. I do not know much about the Israeli chronology, but David must be arroun 1100-1000 and Amenothep IV is from the 14th century... 200/250/300 years apart at least.
 

dreamregent

Ad Honorem
Feb 2013
4,410
Coastal Florida
About the contemporaneity of Akhenaton and David, I'm pretty sure that's not right. I do not know much about the Israeli chronology, but David must be arroun 1100-1000 and Amenothep IV is from the 14th century... 200/250/300 years apart at least.
Yes, that's about right, more or less. In any case, the time of Akhenaten could not have been anything more than a distant memory to the folks who wrote the biblical text.