Alamo - why couldn't Santa Ana march around it

Jan 2008
18,733
Chile, Santiago
#2
I guess the reason would be because of it's strategic importance relating to threatening his supply lines if he choose to march beyond.
 
Oct 2009
5,021
Vancouver
#4
Well I don't imagine Santa Anna figured the Alamo would be quite so hard, so it would be of strategic importance, get a quick victory right off the bat, and like CG said, if you didn't, they could easily launch raids on your supply line or the main body.
 

Robert165

Ad Honorem
Jan 2010
4,266
North Georgia
#5
Well I don't imagine Santa Anna figured the Alamo would be quite so hard, so it would be of strategic importance, get a quick victory right off the bat, and like CG said, if you didn't, they could easily launch raids on your supply line or the main body.
why not move the supply lines?
 

tjadams

Ad Honoris
Mar 2009
25,362
Texas
#7
Ok class, take notes.
One has to go back to Dec. 1835 when Mexican General Cos was in charge of San Antonio & the Alamo. The Mexican Civil War spilled over into Northern Mexico, or Texas. The Texans wanted to take San Antonio as it was the largest city on the Camino Real and an established city.
The Texans took the city and besieged the Alamo ( back wards, I know )
They forced Gen. Cos to surrender his over 1,000 men and camp followers who were holed in inside the Alamo.
Santa Anna was in a hurry to put down the rebellions in Mexico and he headed a column of over 6,000 troops into North Mexico. His column intercepted General Cos' column as they were heading south: they joined together and headed back north to erase the embarrassment of the Mexican surrender.
Santa Anna was a vainglorious person, he personally would oversee the recapture and execution of the Texas rebels in San Antonio. He split his forces to hug the Texas coast under Gen. Jose Urrea while he continued to the Alamo.
The Texas rebels were totally surprised by Santa Anna's rapid advanced and ran into the Alamo for defense as they could not hold both the town and the mission fortress.
For almost two weeks the Texans held off all attempts by Mexican troops to take the Alamo. But by waiting, more and more troops arrived and all the while Gen. Urrea was having great success with his mission and winning accolades while Santa Anna was winning nothing. News had to be sent back to Mexico City that the "Napoleon of the West" was leading a heroic and crushing defeat of the rebels and its government.
Santa Anna was too vain to deposit troops and artillery to wait out the rebels, he wanted a bloody victory to write home about, thus keeping him in charge. So in essence, his vanity for war laurels kept him mired at the Alamo and by doing so, he missed capturing the Texas government officials and which all eventually led to his defeat.
Hope this helps answer the question.
 

Cicero

Ad Honorem
Dec 2009
7,829
Tennessee
#8
No you don't understand this was an insurrection against Mexican authority he went there to quash it.

Thanks TJ. I just got up from my nap and didn't see you anywhere around. I was trying a holding action till you showed up. It's safe t go back to bed now:)
 

tjadams

Ad Honoris
Mar 2009
25,362
Texas
#10
You're most welcome Robert. I've been teaching Texas History for over ten years, studying it for over 30 years and never get tired of talking about it, or even learning more. I even named my son William Travis, how's that for loving a subject. :)
 

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