"Alexander Hamilton" by Ron Chernow

Apr 2015
281
USA
#1
I just started this book which I received for my birthday so I can't review it yet. But as I proceed, I'd enjoy discussing it. Anybody in?

In the Introduction to this 2004 biography, the author tells us that he is drawing on vast volumes of Hamilton's papers that were published in the 1960s-80s as well as some previously unknown essays by Hamilton that he uncovered in his research and primary sources from records in Europe and the West Indies. A lot of this material wouldn't have been available to earlier biographers, so this should be interesting.
 
Jul 2016
229
Just outside the Rust Belt
#2
I have read it, a good read though I will be the first to admit I found it rather biased towards the end. Though many a biographer paint a flattering portrait of their subject and Chernow will hardly be the first!
 

Viperlord

Ad Honorem
Aug 2010
8,033
VA
#3
I very much enjoyed the book on the whole. The one part I remember as sticking out to me as an example of Chernow's biases coming to the fore is his treatment of the famous duel; it seemed to me he was very much stretching the facts to try and paint Burr as a cold-blooded murderer.
 
Jul 2016
229
Just outside the Rust Belt
#4
I very much enjoyed the book on the whole. The one part I remember as sticking out to me as an example of Chernow's biases coming to the fore is his treatment of the famous duel; it seemed to me he was very much stretching the facts to try and paint Burr as a cold-blooded murderer.
I did not get quite that impression, I more got the impression that Hamilton wanted to paint Burr as a murderer by throwing away his shot and that he succeeded largely in that.

Not to mention Burr was unrepentant in killing a man. But he did try and paint the facts as though Burr came to the duel to kill Hamilton
 
Apr 2015
281
USA
#5
Okay, well I'm only a few chapters into the book, so I haven't read the duel scenes yet. But remember that early on in the book he "foreshadows" the event by describing a duel Hamilton witnessed while living in St. Croix.

From the chapters I've read so far, I am impressed by the way he ties Hamilton's early life experiences to his later achievements. Observing the weaknesses of the sugarcane driven economy in the West Indies, for example, led to his theories on manufacturing and diversification. And witnessing the brutal treatment of slaves in the West Indies resulted in him later becoming an abolitionist.

Interesting.
 
Jan 2016
305
Ohio
#6
I just started this book which I received for my birthday so I can't review it yet. But as I proceed, I'd enjoy discussing it. Anybody in?

In the Introduction to this 2004 biography, the author tells us that he is drawing on vast volumes of Hamilton's papers that were published in the 1960s-80s as well as some previously unknown essays by Hamilton that he uncovered in his research and primary sources from records in Europe and the West Indies. A lot of this material wouldn't have been available to earlier biographers, so this should be interesting.
I'm interested to know how your read went?
 
Aug 2011
5,435
Amerikay
#7
I am reading this Bio also I find it very informative on our History of our government and our Nation at if founding. Keeping reading it shows that very little has charges, with the exception of dueling.
 
Sep 2018
1
England
#9
I have yet to acquire the book, yet it is required for my A-Level History Coursework and I cannot find the page number for a quote I've used “The American Revolution was to succeed because it was undertaken by sceptical men who knew that the same passions toppled tyrannies could be applied to destructive ends.” Could anyone assist me? Much appreciated
 

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