Alexander's Greatest Successors?

Dec 2015
102
Fields of Amber Grain
#1
Alexander died in 323 CE/BC of either supreme drunkenness or poisoning (or a myriad of other reasons) and his empire crumbled after his death within a few years let alone a generation. Roxana killed Stateira to insure his child's succession to the throne almost before Alexander's body was cold, a precursor of how bloody things were to come.

But the question is: Who was Alexander's greatest successors in terms of political skill, generalship and legacy. Some figures like Craterus seem overrated while some figures like Eumnes of Cardia are seem underrated, at the very least as generals. Which of them do you think was the best?

For myself I nominate Ptolemy (for being smart enough to seize Egypt and surviving the Diadohci wars), Seleucus (For getting the biggest chunk of the empire), and Eumnes (For despite being a Greek managed to hold a major position in the Empire and defeated the Craterus in battle)
 
Jan 2016
99
Seattle
#3
Antigonus or Seleucus, but i'm most impressed with Eumenes. No one began with his level adversity and still accomplished so much. Ptolemy never got out of his comfort zone, but he was great for his longevity and his sponsorship of the great library and the scholars of the day.
 
Likes: Menshevik
Dec 2015
102
Fields of Amber Grain
#4
To be fair Ptolemy stole Alexander's body and defeated Perdiccas practically by letting Egypt's terrain do him in. Also his dynasty lasted the longest by a few decades and till Cleopatra's death controlled largely the same territory.

In summery of all the major successors besides Seleucus he managed to survive and not fade into obscurity and founded a lasting dynasty that was wealthy and able to take on the vast Seleucid Empire at it's height something I don't think Diadochi Macedon could've done.
 
Jan 2016
99
Seattle
#6
The tricky thing with Ptolemy is that he was so long lasting, he had such control over the scholarly writings of the day, that it seems like it's his version of events that most influenced what we know about what happened, and how it happened, after Alexander died.
 
Dec 2015
102
Fields of Amber Grain
#7
I'd still point that Eumnes defeated Craterus. A man so popular with his troops that it was believed that at the mere sight of him they would turn on Eumnes and kill him. Not only did Eumnes survive, he defeated and killed Craterus. That's pretty impressive.
 

Menshevik

Ad Honorem
Dec 2012
9,156
here
#8
Antigonus or Seleucus, but i'm most impressed with Eumenes. No one began with his level adversity and still accomplished so much. Ptolemy never got out of his comfort zone, but he was great for his longevity and his sponsorship of the great library and the scholars of the day.
Agreed.

Imo, Eumenes was the most capable of the successor generals. He gets extra points in my book for having a sort of rags to riches story, in that he isn't even Macedonian, yet he climbs just as high, for a time, as any of his Macedonian peers. Not only was he not Macedonian, he wasn't a soldier most of his life, he was a paper pusher. Yet, he ended up being just as talented (if not more so) at war than a lot of his rivals. He meets ruin and defeat not on the battlefield but thru treachery.

His skill at intrigue and court politics is also impressive. Add to this that he was personally brave and courageous, he sought out Antigonus on at least one occasion to engage him in one on one combat.

Lastly, I think he stands above all the Diadochi in that he was very loyal and stalwart. When everyone else was seemingly ready to switch allegiances at the drop of a hat, Eumenes remained loyal to those he served.
 

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