Alternate History- India never collides with Asia

Devdas

Ad Honorem
Apr 2015
4,487
India
#2
Deccan would have been Island in middle of the Indian ocean like Britain or Greenland and there would have been no Himalayas.
 

Devdas

Ad Honorem
Apr 2015
4,487
India
#4
No Himalayas? The Alps would just be too busy these days
The Himalayas exist because of the the Indian plate of Deccan kept colliding with Eurasian place in Tibet and the Indian plate is still moving Northward that's why Earthquakes are common around Himalayas. The great Indo-Gangetic plains were once a sea which was filled up by the silt brought up by the rivers from the Himalayas.
 

stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
3,169
Las Vegas, NV USA
#5
The Himalayas exist because of the the Indian plate of Deccan kept colliding with Eurasian place in Tibet and the Indian plate is still moving Northward that's why Earthquakes are common around Himalayas. The great Indo-Gangetic plains were once a sea which was filled up by the silt brought up by the rivers from the Himalayas.
The process is still continuing and the Himalayas are still rising. India was once a part of Gondwana, the great southern superconinent. Antarctica was also a part of it. Even earlier there was the single supercontinent of Pangea. During the early period of Pangea (around 300 million years ago) it had a large southern icecap which may have included parts of India.
 
May 2017
29
United States of America
#6
Ok, thanks for the answers but I was looking for something different. I was really asking about how it would affect world history. What would the rest of the world look like without any influence from Indian history or culture?
 

stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
3,169
Las Vegas, NV USA
#7
Ok, thanks for the answers but I was looking for something different. I was really asking about how it would affect world history. What would the rest of the world look like without any influence from Indian history or culture?
It depends on where the subcontinent is. The closer it is to the major northern hemisphere land masses, the more it's likely to have an ancient civilzation which might have had influence. If it's deep in the southern hemisphere, it may not have been inhabited until recent times. India made important contrbutions to mathematics, but I'm not sure these ideas would not have eventually come from somewhere else. Infuence goes both ways.

Buddhism originated in India but mostly took root in other countries, particularly in southeast Asia and Tibet.

Egypt and India supplied British industry with much needed cotton during the American Civil War. The textile industry was the leading employer in Great Britain at the time. If Britain had no adequate alternative sources of raw cotton, it might have had to go to war with the US. If they did, the South might have won. Once it split into North and South, it might split again and fragmented into individual states. Not likely, but who knows? No India, no USA?
 
Last edited:
Dec 2011
4,718
Iowa USA
#8
Ok, thanks for the answers but I was looking for something different. I was really asking about how it would affect world history. What would the rest of the world look like without any influence from Indian history or culture?
The rise of the Himalayas is believed to have been *the* catalyst towards a much drier climate since approx 20-28 million years ago. The course of the evolution of apes from primates was impacted.

So, in fact if Earth History Systems is a mature field (and most scientists will say that is...) it is pointless to argue about the history of humanity without the collision, because the most intelligent land mammal today might not even have arisen out of the ape family.
 

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