America: first-human migrations and pre-Colombian (re)discoveries

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
6,131
Portugal
I have already seen that here in the Forum there are a huge interest about the different pre-Columbian “re-discoveries” of the American continent and of the previous human wave migrations to it.

Most of them range from the historical to the speculative and to the ultra-speculative I decide to open this thread and point some of those speculative hypothesis here, hoping that some other members can contribute.

Theoretically all these ideas are possible (some more than others) but we don’t have evidences and sources to threat them as historical.

So here are some of the theses that I recall for the re-discovering:

Phoenicians/Canaanite – hypothesis that those peoples were able to cross the Atlantic in quite early timelines (first millennium BC). These hypothesis has some strong followers among some religious communities (particularly Hebrews and Mormons), and saw already some hoax as the “The Paraíba Stone”, in Brazil;

Medieval Irish – Mainly based on the legendary “Voyage of Saint Brendan”;

Medieval Arab – Mainly based on an excerpt from al-Idrisi, that states that some sailors leaved the port of Lisbon, sailed west, arrived to an inhabited island were they were welcomed and than returned home;

Medieval Mali – This one is the one that I am less familiar. It is based on a excerpt from the works of al-Umari.

Early Modern from Basque and Breton sailors – And their arrival to the coast of Labrador;

Early Modern Portuguese – This theory is essentially based in some indicators like the fact that D. João II moved to West the meridian of the Tordesilhas Treaty, allowing the Portuguese to claim the Brazil coast before its official discovery in 1500; some early voyages in the Labrador coast…

And on the other side… the Polynesian arrival to the West coast of South America (I don’t know if this is speculative or already confirmed).

Surely the community can develop these themes and add some more hypothesis!
 

Chlodio

Forum Staff
Aug 2016
4,728
Dispargum
DNA testing has confirmed that South American chickens have Polynesian ancestors. The Polynesians must have brought chickens with them on their voyages and some of these birds bred with native chickens in S. America.

"The Voyage of St. Brendan" tells of lands somewhere to the west of Ireland but the lack of detail makes it impossible to identify these lands. It could be Iceland, Greenland, or maybe he made it all the way to N. America.

Don't forget Leif Ericson, whose short term settlement in Labrador is established historically and archealogically.
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
6,131
Portugal
"The Voyage of St. Brendan" tells of lands somewhere to the west of Ireland but the lack of detail makes it impossible to identify these lands. It could be Iceland, Greenland, or maybe he made it all the way to N. America.
Sometimes the sources just don’t talk to us.

Don't forget Leif Ericson, whose short term settlement in Labrador is established historically and archealogically.
That was an intentional omission, since we are here talking about speculative hypothesis. The presence of the Norsemen in America is no longer speculative.
 

LatinoEuropa

Ad Honorem
Oct 2015
5,222
Matosinhos Portugal
What I think the universal story is full of theories, this post can be one of them.
Secondly I say that it was the Vikings who were the first to arrive to the north of America, I ask if they were the first because they did not take care of America, past centuries after the Vikings came to America the Christopher Columbus to the service of the king of Castile because the king Of portugal did not ask and with the arrival of colombo america was taken, if indeed the vikings were the first to reach north america, because they did not take care of the new continent. Friends for me is more a theory about america because america was already inhabited Before the Columbus. Much history is made in theories
 

kazeuma

Ad Honorem
Jun 2012
2,412
here is the wiki with a list

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pre-Columbian_trans-oceanic_contact_theories#Claims_of_Chinese_contact


but unlike them I was going for the Xu Fu expedition:

Xu Fu was an alchemist under the First Emperor - in order to find the elixer of immorality, he left from China and sailed westward never to be seen again.

Later writers place Xu Fu founding a kingdom in Penglai which has been considered either part of Eastern Russia, Ryukyu, Mount Fuji in Japan, or California / Alaska
 

Naima

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
2,323
Venice
I have already seen that here in the Forum there are a huge interest about the different pre-Columbian “re-discoveries” of the American continent and of the previous human wave migrations to it.

Most of them range from the historical to the speculative and to the ultra-speculative I decide to open this thread and point some of those speculative hypothesis here, hoping that some other members can contribute.

Theoretically all these ideas are possible (some more than others) but we don’t have evidences and sources to threat them as historical.

So here are some of the theses that I recall for the re-discovering:

Phoenicians/Canaanite – hypothesis that those peoples were able to cross the Atlantic in quite early timelines (first millennium BC). These hypothesis has some strong followers among some religious communities (particularly Hebrews and Mormons), and saw already some hoax as the “The Paraíba Stone”, in Brazil;

Medieval Irish – Mainly based on the legendary “Voyage of Saint Brendan”;

Medieval Arab – Mainly based on an excerpt from al-Idrisi, that states that some sailors leaved the port of Lisbon, sailed west, arrived to an inhabited island were they were welcomed and than returned home;

Medieval Mali – This one is the one that I am less familiar. It is based on a excerpt from the works of al-Umari.

Early Modern from Basque and Breton sailors – And their arrival to the coast of Labrador;

Early Modern Portuguese – This theory is essentially based in some indicators like the fact that D. João II moved to West the meridian of the Tordesilhas Treaty, allowing the Portuguese to claim the Brazil coast before its official discovery in 1500; some early voyages in the Labrador coast…

And on the other side… the Polynesian arrival to the West coast of South America (I don’t know if this is speculative or already confirmed).

Surely the community can develop these themes and add some more hypothesis!
There are many about Roman contacts as well.