American History - General

Oct 2013
1,317
Monza, Italy
Talking about American movies, I would recommend this one as a view on the "Deep South": https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Intruder_(1962_film). But other iconic movies regarding America and American society could be, in a way or another, Forrest Gump, The Blues Brothers and/or Philadelphia....but there are plenty, (movies about the working class, movies about the Vietnam War, movies about the American dream...) even by an European/ Italian viewpoin through which I have grewn up.
 

royal744

Ad Honoris
Jul 2013
10,631
San Antonio, Tx
Yes, I ought, but I can't, unfortunately. I'm getting old, no money enough, and ... if I come to America ... I never return home ... because ... I would lost my way ... in the airport ... I'm not a "traveller" ... except for my imagination. :)

However, I have already walked along Texas roads. Especially in San Antonio, as far as Alamo Mission. They are two: the original founded by the Spanish missionaries in 1718. The other, was built two miles far for the movie Alamo, directed by John Ford.

I also saw the San Jacinto River, where Sam Houston and General Santa Anna clashed on April 21, 1836.

And I have also heard Waylon Jennings's songs in the distance (in modern times). :)

Thanks, Larry, good to know. You can hold your own in any western movie contest.
 

royal744

Ad Honoris
Jul 2013
10,631
San Antonio, Tx
Yes, I'm persuaded. And now, I must take of care of my 95-years-old mother, being also an only son. She fell at Christmas and broke her thigh-bone.

I was born in countryside, among corn and wheat fields. I had an wild hill behind my old house at my disposal, and that was my "old West". I live in town now, but I don't like it. So, as soon as possible, I take my car and drive to the countryside. My old hill is still there ... wild ... quiet ... though many things have changed over the years (many houses built!). That hill is my "Apache Pass". 40 years ago, you could smell hay and straw, you could run in the fields and see the sunsets in the distance on the Prealps. All this looked like a John Ford's movie.

I began being interested in the United States in 1976, at 17. I was an apprentice in an factory (gold) at that time and, after my work, I used to visit book shops. My first book has been America, by Alistair Cooke. Then the classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, by Dee Brown who, I believed, he was an Indian author. On the contrary, he was born in Louisiana and had some Indian friends. He was a librarian for the Department of Agriculture.

I began reading over the years, then, in 1992, I visited twice the USIS (United States Information Service) in Milan. A great experience! I found some documents, written in English, so, I also became a translator and learnt English as a self-taught at home. In 1994, I visited the American embassy in Rome (the best experience in my life! I stayed there three days), and found further documents. From then on, no more travels. Then, in 1997, I became a subscriber of an American journal, from Baltimore, Maryland, and I'm still a subscriber of that journal. Meanwhile, I began writing, and I wrote some Western. I'm not a "real writer", but I enjoyed to do that. Now, since 2009, I'm also a subscriber in an American library in Chicago, Illinois.

This is the history of my life. I have always loved the American people. The Americans have always been part of me.
Wow, Larry, we need to make you into an “Honorary American”...
 

royal744

Ad Honoris
Jul 2013
10,631
San Antonio, Tx
Colomba Solitaria, or Lonesome Dove was broadcast by Italian national TV in 1991. I don't remember it very well, because I only saw some episodes. Larry McMurtry is 81 now, being born in 1936.

There is another movie based on one of his novel, that is, Horseman Pass By. The 1963-movie is entitled Hud, or, for me, Hud il Selvaggio starring: Paul Newman. A great movie!

The cattle industry was started by Joseph McCoy, and it reminds me of the "cowtowns" such as Abilene, Kansas.
I believe that Abilene, Kansas (not Abilene, Texas) was a big railhead that cattleranchers needed to reach to supply beef to the East Coast.

I saw HUD in the 60s. Newman is always good.
 

royal744

Ad Honoris
Jul 2013
10,631
San Antonio, Tx
I don't know, the de la Pena diary seems to have some inconsistencies according to historians. Although I guess it is accepted now that were fighters that survived the battle, something they taught never me in school not that many years ago.

I have another Texas history-Old West question for you, royal744. It's said that William Quantrill and Bloody Billy Anderson's men spent time in Texas during the Civil War. George Shepherd, a member of the group who's not much remembered, supposedly hired two other members--a then unknown Jesse James, and James Anderson the little brother of Bill, to protect his son who had a $5,000 bounty on his head. Instead of protecting him James and Anderson killed the man and collected the reward money. It's said that Shepherd later caught up to Anderson in TExas and slit his throat on the grounds of the state capital in Austin. You ever heard any of this? There's a scant record online, but no much.

George Washington Sheperd or Shepherd (Outlaw)
Interesting story but I do not know the answer.
 

royal744

Ad Honoris
Jul 2013
10,631
San Antonio, Tx
Yes, it's true. Sometimes, I wonder why the KKK movement is born the United States. I think not only to "frighten" the Blacks, but also for political reasons.

Was it a kind of "revenge" for the South?

One of the klansman in the movie was a young John Ford. :)

Woodrow Wilson was an intellectual president, like Jefferson. He studied at Princeton and was also chancellor of that University, in New Jersey.
Birth of a Nation was a terrible movie and yes, it was a kind of revenge.- revenge of the ignorant...
 

royal744

Ad Honoris
Jul 2013
10,631
San Antonio, Tx
The Ox-Bow Incident or Alba Fatale is a dramatic Western, indeed, and I saw it three or four times.

Of course. Not every Western is a great movie. I agree with you. There are A-movies and B-movies. Sometimes, I like more B-movies than A-movies because I consider them similar to Remington's or Russell's paintings. An Italian critic said about The Searchers: "Ford's movies are pastel landscapes after Remington". And I agree with him.

The so-called "Cavalry Trio" (if you mean Fort Apache, She Wore a Yellow Ribbon, and Rio Grande), known by me as Il Massacro di Fort Apache, I Cavalieri del Nord-Ovest, and Rio Bravo, respectively) are part of a series of short-stories written by James Warner Bellah and are masterpieces, I think, that is, A-movies.

Yes, you are right. All the movies are important. I also like WWII B-Movies.
Larry, I know all of these movies and have seen them multiple times. They are part of my youth but I have been happy to revisit them later in life. I’m a little surprised that so far into this discussion, no one has mentioned my all time favorite, High Noon, starring Gary Cooper, Grace Kelly and KatyJurado. I think the theme song Do Not Forsake Me Oh My Darling - sung by Franke Layne (sp?) somehow evokes a time in my youth. Whatever. If it comes on the TV, I’m gonna watch it.