American Intellectuals

Dec 2014
350
Italy
#1
John Franklin Jameson (1859-1937) was an historian, author, and journal editor in the early 20th century. He was born in Massachusetts. He graduated from Amherst College in 1879. He was influenced by Herbert Baxter Adams, who was head of the department of history and political science at the Johns Hopkins University. Jameson received there the first doctorate in history in 1882. Then he became an instructor, and moved to Brown University as professor in 1888. He was a social historian, an expert in historiography. He was one of the founder of the American Historical Association, in 1884, president of Historical Manuscripts Commission, in 1895, and first managing editor of the American Historical Review (AHR), (1895-1901), (1905-1928). Then we find him at the University of Chicago, and then he went to Washington in 1905 as director of the Department of Historical Research of Carnegie Institution of Washington until 1928. Jameson was the first professional historian to become the AHA president (1907), and invited W.E.B. Du Bois to present a paper concerning Reconstruction at the 1909 AHA meeting, which proved controversial; Du Bois was the only African-American to be invited until 1940. In 1913-1915, he was accused of being undemocratic. During World War I Jameson edited historical material for soldiers in their training camps, and he published articles in the AHR that supported the Allies. At Carnegie, Jameson supervised a series of documentary publications, such as guides to archival resources around the world, documentary editions of the letters of members of the Continental Congress, documents on the slave trade and slave law, and the papers of Andrew Jackson, as well as an atlas of American history. He contributed to create the National Archives. After losing his position at Carnegie in 1928, he became head of the Division of Manuscripts at the Library of Congress, where he made some notable acquisitions of major collections.
 
Last edited:
Dec 2012
1,130
Savannah, GA
#6
I've never heard of him but he seems like he was rather influential. One thing I'll note is that Brown University has one of the premier PhD history programs in the United States and in particular Brown has a large "Atlantic World" history program. If I had a guess, Jameson probably had a hand in building that program up judging by his work on the history of the slave trade.
 
Dec 2014
350
Italy
#7
I've never heard of him but he seems like he was rather influential. One thing I'll note is that Brown University has one of the premier PhD history programs in the United States and in particular Brown has a large "Atlantic World" history program. If I had a guess, Jameson probably had a hand in building that program up judging by his work on the history of the slave trade.
Not only slave trade, but also colonial history in general, American Revolution, and political and constitutional history.

When you mention "Atlantic history" (or World), it also reminds me a modern historian: the great Jack P. Greene. In my opinion, Greene seems another Jameson.