Anachronism - what do you do?

athena

Ad Honorem
Jan 2010
4,959
Eugene, Oregon
#21
For the most part, it is an indication of a lack of knowledge. Encouraging students to learn history - including name and places, and correcting them when they use current terms for past places, is a start.
The problem is not just in history, but also in math. It is a budget problem, and pushing teachers to teach classes when they really are not knowledgeable of the subject. Then trying to rush students through the learning process so the school meets its requirements and textbooks that teach to the test, explaining what happened incorrectly so the child can relate to the lesson without really knowing the deeper history but is able to pass the test.
 

athena

Ad Honorem
Jan 2010
4,959
Eugene, Oregon
#22
I was bothered by a book that stated Napoleon invaded the Soviet Union, and the capital was Moscow.
Yes, St. Petersburg was an almost impenetrable wetland/marsh.
I do better when I pursue history as a hobby rather than an academic course.
Zooie, that is painfully bad. :persevere:
 
Dec 2016
177
USA
#23
I have a pet peeve. Students using false geography terms in history work bugs me to no end.

There is no Saudi Arabia in Muhammad's day.
There was no Turkey during the Greek or Roman hey day.
Julius Caesar did not conquer the French. Etc.

It is not the fault of the students much of the time.

What do you do to correct this bad habit?
I think you're overly-sensitive about such technical geographical misnomers made by students.

Using modern-day names for the various nations and/or city-states helps that geographical location be more recognizable to those reading the students' report or essay. I mean, if read an article that says "Mumbai" and its referring to Bombay in the 1950's, I am totally fine with it. I have been given the information I need and can extrapolate, and then get onto the gist of the article.

Of course a mention of the former name of the area would be nice added information, and would help anybody reading the article know that term for such time when they encounter it again in historical reading. But I still would not get upset or even irritated about somebody using a modern name that technically was not the same during the time period of the essay.

Just me, though. I am not a scholar or a history professor, just a history buff, so if I find the article otherwise enjoyable and informative it's all good.
 

Scaeva

Ad Honorem
Oct 2012
5,446
#25
Technically, Julius Caesar defeated a minor branch tribe of Franks - the ancestors of the French empire - so technically he did conquered France
The Franks were a collection of Germanic tribes that didn't coalesce into a confederation until the 3rd century AD. The Gauls were Celts.

Caesar predates the Franks by over three hundred years. There were probably ancestors of some of the Franks among the Germans Caesar defeated at the Battle of Vosges, but at that time they weren't called Franks.
 
Jan 2015
3,191
Rupert's Land ;)
#26
I am very busy choosing for a shirt for a Christmas party

I have a pet peeve. Students using false geography terms in history work bugs me to no end.

There is no Saudi Arabia in Muhammad's day.
There was no Turkey during the Greek or Roman hey day.
Julius Caesar did not conquer the French. Etc.
:cool::cool:
It is not the fault of the students much of the time.

What do you do to correct this bad habit?
Which habit?
The anachronistic history or stressing about it? :D
Just be happy if they know the difference between Slovenia and Slovakia, or if they know the difference between Martin Luther and Martin Luther King :think:
 

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,292
Brassicaland
#27
Quote:
Originally Posted by VHS

I was bothered by a book that stated Napoleon invaded the Soviet Union, and the capital was Moscow.
Yes, St. Petersburg was an almost impenetrable wetland/marsh.
I do better when I pursue history as a hobby rather than an academic course.


Zooie, that is painfully bad. :persevere:
While it is awfully historically inaccurate, many people have no idea about historical geopolitical situations.
Still, being clear on historical geopolitical situation is important for understanding history.
 

Wenge

Ad Honoris
Apr 2011
10,429
Virginia
#29
While it is awfully historically inaccurate, many people have no idea about historical geopolitical situations.
Still, being clear on historical geopolitical situation is important for understanding history.
Especially Chinese students, they have no true understanding about real history.
 

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