Ancient Disasters and their affect on religion

Sep 2014
694
Texas
#1
The Pleistocene Age was marked by cold but at the end of it something terrible happened, a deep and bitter cold that wiped out a lot of animals that might have survived without it. This sudden bitter cold Younger Dryas that killed off the megafauna in the northern hemisphere may have been caused by an asteroid strike in Canada. This mass extinction I believe stayed in the collective belief system of ancient people.

What Caused the Younger Dryas Cold Event? | Geology | GeoScienceWorld

The Hittites, Irish and Cheyenne Native Americans all have a missing god myth. In this story an important god disappears and the world turns cold and the animals die off and people are reduced to eating dirt. When the god returns the earth warms up and the animals return. The Greeks and Norse have a missing female deity who returns.

In the Middle East it is usually a mother goddess rescuing her son/lover from the underworld.

The other event is the Great Flood. A lot of folks either don't believe in it or assumes it was a local event. What if it was the melting of the glaciers.

Robert Ballard - Wikipedia (my hero by the way along with Jacques Cousteau)

Noah's Not-so-big Flood

The Hopi have a belief that says they will wake up in a bed of water. This most certainly happened when the ice dam melted at Lake Bonneville and poured tons of water on to the land.

And there are a lot of religions who speak of a great flood. What if this was true? the scablands in Oregon show that several floods poured through the valley.

Univeral ideas could come from universal events.
 

Frank81

Ad Honorem
Feb 2010
4,933
Canary Islands-Spain
#2
Mar 2018
475
UK
#3
Univeral ideas could come from universal events.
Why?

Universal ideas can also come from universal aspects of human psychology. Just about every culture ever recorded has a Sun deity. Does that mean that the Sun was at one point capable of talking? Religions also very commonly have a multi-breasted fertility Goddess, does that mean there used to a women with 20 teats walking around?
 
Likes: bedb
Nov 2010
7,260
Cornwall
#4
Not sure about the truth of it but one of the most convincing stories I heard about the 'flood' was about the time when the Black Sea, which used to be land, flooded, presumably from some breakage/overflow at the Bosphorus. They found all sorts of ancient structures preserved in the Oxygen starved mud.

I suppose if you lived in that area, that event would radiate all around to turn up in many religions and beleifs
 
Likes: bedb
Sep 2014
694
Texas
#5
Why?

Universal ideas can also come from universal aspects of human psychology. Just about every culture ever recorded has a Sun deity. Does that mean that the Sun was at one point capable of talking? Religions also very commonly have a multi-breasted fertility Goddess, does that mean there used to a women with 20 teats walking around?
It makes sense that an ancients worshipped the sun. I am always fascinated by the difference. In Japan it's a goddess. In Egypt and ancient Europe it traveled in a boat (this one is very fascinating) and the IE rode in chariots.
 
Mar 2018
475
UK
#6
It makes sense that an ancients worshipped the sun. I am always fascinated by the difference. In Japan it's a goddess. In Egypt and ancient Europe it traveled in a boat (this one is very fascinating) and the IE rode in chariots.
You quoted my post but completely ignored the only point I made in it... I'll restate it here:

Different people can come up with similar stories/ideas without witnessing the same events. This is because people share some inherent neuro-psychological traits. Frankly, if I want to invent a story about a God killing lots of people, a flood is just about the easiest thing to imagine, for me and it would be the same for cultures near the sea/rivers where drowning was a common cause of death. That is the null hypothesis, so to speak. If you want to claim that those different stories have roots in the same real events, then it's up to you to provide compelling evidence for it.

This is similar to there being pyramids in many different parts of the world. You could interpret that as evidence of a world-wide neolithic civilization. But the non-crazy thing is to realise that several different people had the idea of building progressively smaller squares of rocks on top of each other.


So I'm not ruling out the possibility of a single epic flood that marked humans collective memory. I just don't see any reason to give the theory any credence.
 
Oct 2016
884
Merryland
#7
read a theory some time back about empires that 'disappear' or end suddenly.
discussed about priest/noble class studying astronomy, and thus knew when things like eclipses would happen.
scenario; High Priest Gumwah calls an assembly and announces that the gods were taking the sun away. the people beg for mercy. Gumwah announces that the gods demand a sacrifice in small untraceable bills. eclipse starts. people pay up. eclipse ends. whew. empire saved.
but what happens when a surprise eclipse comes? or if one is announced and doesn't happen? the people take Gumwah and hang him by his heels. regime change.

many religions have the appearance of paying protection money; give gold etc to the gods and they keep the rain coming the sun shining, etc. what happens when there is no rain, or a tsunami hits, or other event? the people feel like they've been paying up and aren't getting their moneys worth. our gods aren't doing their jobs so lets get new ones.
 
Likes: bedb
Sep 2014
694
Texas
#8
You quoted my post but completely ignored the only point I made in it... I'll restate it here:

Different people can come up with similar stories/ideas without witnessing the same events. This is because people share some inherent neuro-psychological traits. Frankly, if I want to invent a story about a God killing lots of people, a flood is just about the easiest thing to imagine, for me and it would be the same for cultures near the sea/rivers where drowning was a common cause of death. That is the null hypothesis, so to speak. If you want to claim that those different stories have roots in the same real events, then it's up to you to provide compelling evidence for it.

This is similar to there being pyramids in many different parts of the world. You could interpret that as evidence of a world-wide neolithic civilization. But the non-crazy thing is to realise that several different people had the idea of building progressively smaller squares of rocks on top of each other.


So I'm not ruling out the possibility of a single epic flood that marked humans collective memory. I just don't see any reason to give the theory any credence.
You have to admit the melting of the glaciers would have affected the entire northern hemisphere. And I said could not did.


At the end of the last Ice Age, fires ravaged the American northwest. It is possible the conditions Could have also existed elsewhere.

Sorry I ignored your belief, I did not know you wanted a response. The various ways to worship the sun are more my speed.
 
Jun 2013
404
Connecticut
#9
The disasters during the Crisis of the 3rd C. Rome led to a rapid growth in the Christian religion throughout the empire.
It was an "end of the world" scenario that produced a deluge of disasters. Incessant civil wars injured society and the empire fragmented into three political divisions. Concurrently the first ever widespread Gothic migrations/invasions happened. A great plague (25-62) ripped through the empire depleting cities and farms. Records indicate weather changes, e.g. warmer, drier summers, for the worse. Poor weather and depopulation led to famine and a catch-22 cycle of more cities, towns and farms breaking down. There was no economy which led to no trade which led to depression and a loss of money.
People sought solace in Jesus and His church. The churches grew and many bishoprics existed. Rome, Carthage, Alexandria and Lyons were becoming Christin cities.
Despite some minor persecutions most people sought spiritual relief in the face of such overwhelming misery.
But by the beginning of the 4th C., some emperors felt that there were too many Christians and something had to be done about it.
 
Likes: bedb
Mar 2017
854
Colorado
#10
There are many mtn ranges in the world where you can find seashells. In Yoho Nat'l Park in British Columbia at an elevation of 7,500' reside the fossils of sea creatures 500 million yrs old. What's an easier story to believe? A worldwide flood which of course left sea creatures at high altitudes, or a cockamamy story of continental drift and geologic plates taking eons to force the bottom of the sea to the top of a mtn?

I'm totally onboard for commonality in myths explaining natural disasters ... or natural anythings on a grand scale.


....if you came upon a decent amount of sauropod spine, how would you explain it? Big snake? Dragon maybe?
 

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