Ancient European Pyramids (not the Bosnian Hills)

cachibatches

Ad Honorem
Mar 2012
2,351
Good day all. Unlike a lot of the rest of the world, ancient European societies very rarely made Pyramid structures. Megaliths, temples, stadiums, aqueducts, fortifications...the Romans even made something like an ancient shopping mall. But they very rarely delved into the realm of Pyramids, and examples are conspicuous by their rarity.

I have been researching some exceptions to the rule and thought that my fellow posters might like to contribute or just see. Please, as stated in the title, no hills in Bosnia or anywhere else. Just confirmed sites. Let us go in rough chronological order.

Mergeleva Ridge

Mergeleva Ridge Ukraine. Mergeleva Ridge Lugansk Region. Stonehange Ukraine

A series of stone and clay structures and kurgans on top of an artificial or terraformed hill. The initial description of this as a "pyramid" was walked back. However, there is no doubt that the site, near Luhansk, Ukraine, is of major archeological significance, and if the hill it is situated on is indeed artificial or terraformed, it still meets my description in the same sense as a Chinese Pyrmaid or Cahokia. Dates to 4000 B.C.. (!) and part of the Dnieper-Donets or early Yamna culture. Check out some more of the pics.




Step pyramid at Monte d'Accoddi.

The History of Europe Podcast: Sardinian Step Pyramids

This Sardinian pyramid seems to date back to the third millennium B.C. according to several sources.




Pyramid of Hellinikon

[ame="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greek_pyramids"]Greek pyramids - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia[/ame]

And other Greek pyramids. My guess is that this is some kind of Mycenaean fort, but some estimates have it as old as 3000 B.C.



Etruscan pyramid Alter

ABOUT THE ETRUSCAN PYRAMID AT BOMARZO, ITALY AND

A neat looking terraformed rock carved out by the Etruscans for the purpose of sacrifice.




Pyramid of Cestius

[ame="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyramid_of_Cestius"]Pyramid of Cestius - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia[/ame]

Built by a roman noble, possibly inspired by the Nubian campaign, the pyramid stands and impressive 124 feet tall, and was later incorporated into an Italian castle wall.


Lastly, there is a second roman pyramid which is no longer extant.

Meta Romuli

[ame="http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meta_Romuli"]Meta Romuli - Wikipedia[/ame]

If anyone knows of some other worthy additions, please share.

 
Last edited:

AlpinLuke

Forum Staff
Oct 2011
27,181
Italy, Lago Maggiore
I was thinking to Monte d'Accoddi too, again in Sardinia there is a disputed structure, at Pozzomaggiore, which is matter of discussion among archaeologists. It could be the second Ziggurat of Sardinia to be discovered, but its ruined state doesn't allow to reach a conclusive identification.
 
Apr 2011
561
34° 36' Sur
Nice thread! Just looking for different pictures of Sardinia's pyramid found this: A sacred well? Sardinia?s Sacred Wells which of course reminder me of something discussed at length in this forum about pyramid's construction, now I'm curious to learn much more about this pyramid.
 

cachibatches

Ad Honorem
Mar 2012
2,351
Nice thread! Just looking for different pictures of Sardinia's pyramid found this: A sacred well? Sardinia?s Sacred Wells which of course reminder me of something discussed at length in this forum about pyramid's construction, now I'm curious to learn much more about this pyramid.
Very nice. Running around right now but will thoroughly read later. Thanks for contributing.