Ancient History Forum - Greece, Rome, etc. Why?

Dec 2014
559
EU
Hi all.

History of Europe.

I think traditionally it all starts in Crete with Minoan civilization. It was Ancient Greece, then Rome etc., that's how it is thought in schools, and the same description is being used in this particular forum.

But why are we being thought like this?

Seems like there are older places, like for example in Bulgaria. I think we are talking about 1000 years and more here.

Should school teachings and history books be updated?
 
Last edited:
Jun 2014
1,221
VA
Hi all.

History of Europe.

I think traditionally it all starts in Crete with Minoan civilization. It was Ancient Greece, then Rome etc., that's how it is thought in schools, and the same description is being used in this particular forum.

But why are we being thought like this?

Seems like there are older places, like for example in Bulgaria. I think we are talking about 1000 years and more here.

Should school teachings and history books be updated?
Ideally everything would be taught.

Realistically what is in the classroom doesn't sink in so prioritization has to happen (which is why American schools don't generally touch Rome unless you take Latin).

If you are asking why Greek and Roman History (which is not the same as modern Greece and modern Italy) is high priority while Minoan and Bulgaria n history isn't that is a different thread.
 
Dec 2014
559
EU
Well Minoan history was mentioned as part of the Ancient Greece but I don't remember anything being mentioned about Bulgarian history, which is supposedly older. So why not start with Bulgarian if its older? (I think we are talking about 1000 years and more here. ?)
 
Last edited:
Dec 2014
559
EU
Archaeologists believe that the town was home to some 350 people and dates back to between 4700 and 4200 BC.
That is about 1,500 years before the start of ancient Greek civilisation.


BBC News - Europe's oldest prehistoric town unearthed in Bulgaria

---

Solnitsata - Believed by Bulgarian archaeologists to be the oldest town in Europe, Solnitsata was the site of a salt production facility approximately six millennia ago;[1] it flourished ca 4700-4200 BC.

[ame=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solnitsata]Solnitsata - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia[/ame]

---

Gradeshnitsa tablets - The tablets are dated to the 5th millennium BC and are currently preserved in the Vratsa Archeological Museum of Bulgaria.

[ame="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gradeshnitsa_tablets"]Gradeshnitsa tablets - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia[/ame]
 
Last edited:
Jun 2014
1,221
VA
Archaeologists believe that the town was home to some 350 people and dates back to between 4700 and 4200 BC.
That is about 1,500 years before the start of ancient Greek civilisation.

n archaeologists to be the oldest town in Europe, Solnitsata was the site of a salt production facility approximately six millennia ago;[1] it flourished ca 4700-4200 BC.
[/I]
Solnitsata - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
BBC News - Europe's oldest prehistoric town unearthed in Bulgaria

---

Solnitsata - Believed by Bulgaria

---

Gradeshnitsa tablets - The tablets are dated to the 5th millennium BC and are currently preserved in the Vratsa Archeological Museum of Bulgaria.

Gradeshnitsa tablets - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Your links answer your question; you are dealing in prehistoric times.

School curriculum are either teaching just their nations history or the history of western civilization+some non-Western civ (unless it is a non-Euro country in which case they generally just identify their own nation as their civilization). Greek and Roman civilization are considered the foundation of western civilization; not pre-historic civilization.
 

BenSt

Ad Honorem
Aug 2013
4,565
Canada, originally Clwyd, N.Wales
The reality is with curriculum, they're somewhat designed to teach students about things which make up their own cultures. In the English speaking world, Greece and Rome play a far more prominent place in British History, the fountain head of all English speaking countries in the world. Same too for many other western European nations which colonized. So, although that ancient history is there, as Magnus says, there has to be a prioritizing. If you look in western europe, Rome has more of an impact because it once ruled these areas, as far as I know ancient Bulgaria never ruled France or Spain etc,.
 

Scaeva

Ad Honorem
Oct 2012
5,630
The reality is with curriculum, they're somewhat designed to teach students about things which make up their own cultures. In the English speaking world, Greece and Rome play a far more prominent place in British History, the fountain head of all English speaking countries in the world. Same too for many other western European nations which colonized. So, although that ancient history is there, as Magnus says, there has to be a prioritizing. If you look in western europe, Rome has more of an impact because it once ruled these areas, as far as I know ancient Bulgaria never ruled France or Spain etc,.
Another issue is that we know far more about the Romans or the Greeks than we do the Thracians, thanks to a wealth of ancient Greek and Roman writers to rely on. In fact much of what we know about the Thracians is coming from those same writers. The Greeks and Romans were much better at preserving their history.
 
Dec 2014
559
EU
It seems like even older tablets were found in Romania:
T?rt?ria tablets - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The discovery caused great interest in the archeological world as it predated the first Minoan writing, the oldest known writing in Europe.

If the symbols are indeed a form of writing, then writing in the Danubian culture would far predate the earliest Sumerian cuneiform script or Egyptian hieroglyphs. They would thus be the world's earliest known form of writing. This claim remains controversial.
 

Frank81

Ad Honorem
Feb 2010
5,087
Canary Islands-Spain
They don't know for sure if those Thracian tablets express a form of writing or not.

Minoan writing is still the first undoubtul form of writing appeared in Europe.