Ancient Indian Ranged Weapon

Sep 2015
375
Sri Lanka
#22
Valari or valai thadi is a throwing sickle used primarily by the Tamil people of India. It is similar to boomerang but made out of Iron.
VALARI was used by Egyptians ,Summerians , Tamils of Madurai and Eelam and people of Sahul !----There were several types some made of wood or Ivory and only lately using metals. It was used as a weapon of "Boomerang" or like a Spear depending on the" Angle of the curvature" of the weapon and also the way you throw it ---From my memory I guess it was last used by Famous Maruthu Brothers against British with devastating effect ----Colonel James Well wrote about the Valari and Maruthu brothers -- Maruthu Brothers belonged to" Piramalai Kallar " an ancient tribe of Maravar Kingdom .They were the first "Coastal migrants" from Africa [M 130] who set foot first in our " Glorious Land of Bharath" around 60,OO0--- 40.000 years ago !! The rest migrated further down to SE Asia and probably via the "Submerged Sunda Land" to Sahul :)
 

Attachments

Last edited:
Jun 2012
6,968
Malaysia
#23
Actually no, that is quite an old, if rare indian war implement. The oldest reference to the Chakram as a weapon, is from the 'Dasarajna war', where Sudas defeats the alliance of ten tribes against him. It also finds mention in Mauryan era (or possibly, Gupta era) Arthashastra. However, it is largely missing from mid-medeival Indian history (500s BCE) till recent reintroduction.

IMO, the Chakram was a limited weapon- used to surprise rather than sustain combat. In Indian locales, only the nobility of the earlier era would've had some sort of neck protection and a well aimed initial volley could serve as a decapitation, if not the aspect of throwing off your enemy.
Wud hv been fantastic, if perfectly mastered, as a weapon for guerrilla warfare. Imagine a metal disc spinning in the air, coming at you on a constantly changing path, and finally finding your head or neck, perhaps striking you from behind. With little sound, so quite possibly without you even being aware. Even if it doesn't make a good enough hit to decapitate you completely, a strong strike cud still split your skull.

The modern sports discus is indeed a latter day descendant and/or variant of the chakram. Or perhaps, alternatively, one might also say that the chakram was an Indian variant of the ancient Greek discus.
 
Sep 2015
375
Sri Lanka
#24
Wud hv been fantastic, if perfectly mastered, as a weapon for guerrilla warfare. Imagine a metal disc spinning in the air, coming at you on a constantly changing path, and finally finding your head or neck, perhaps striking you from behind. With little sound, so quite possibly without you even being aware. Even if it doesn't make a good enough hit to decapitate you completely, a strong strike cud still split your skull.

The modern sports discus is indeed a latter day descendant and/or variant of the chakram. Or perhaps, alternatively, one might also say that the chakram was an Indian variant of the ancient Greek discus.
Hindus in India who knew Mahabharatha and Ramayana epics very often get confused History with the Mythology----Because occasionally there are some kernel of Truth or rules of Ethics/Morality in such Mythological stories .But all over the world they often used to spread a subminal message for social /Political control of the masses!
In my opinion there was no such weapon existed in ancient Greece or India except in their Epics---Most likely she was talking about "Sudarshan chakra" of Lord Vishnu! --A Minor Aryan Deity was made a Major Deity in Hinduism by the Vedic-Bhramins with the concept of "Avatars" :) Lol
 

Attachments

Last edited:

specul8

Ad Honorem
Oct 2016
2,189
Australia
#26
Didn't the Indians also use knuckle dusters similar to those used by Japanese ninja?
Not commonly. They mostly used the Sikh 'bangle' , it can be used on the wrist , to strike, slip down to the hand so it can be grasped and held outwards ( holding the back edge) and used as a short range weapon, or grasp it using the front edge. Sometimes, 3 crossed chakrams are worn under or in the turban to make it sword resistant. There is also the dagger, which they MUST carry .l


But, like the Japanese, the sword has a religious tradition in Sikhism , I mean, ever been in their temple and seen the altar ? Covered (the lower part) in swords, chakram, shields, spears .

Here is their sacred symbol

1539717964138.png

based on

2 curved swords, 1 straight edged sword and a chakram

1539718023252.png
 
Oct 2018
6
India
#27
VALARI was used by Egyptians ,Summerians , Tamils of Madurai and Eelam and people of Sahul !----There were several types some made of wood or Ivory and only lately using metals. It was used as a weapon of "Boomerang" or like a Spear depending on the" Angle of the curvature" of the weapon and also the way you throw it ---From my memory I guess it was last used by Famous Maruthu Brothers against British with devastating effect ----Colonel James Well wrote about the Valari and Maruthu brothers -- Maruthu Brothers belonged to" Piramalai Kallar " an ancient tribe of Maravar Kingdom .They were the first "Coastal migrants" from Africa [M 130] who set foot first in our " Glorious Land of Bharath" around 60,OO0--- 40.000 years ago !! The rest migrated further down to SE Asia and probably via the "Submerged Sunda Land" to Sahul :)
First, let's not name a country based on a Hindu Myth.
Keeladi excavation showed no sign of religious activity happening there.
None of the 5000 artifacts excavated from Keeladi has nothing to do with religion.

Also, there is already a growing view among geneticists that South Asians populated the rest of the world.
Especially after the finding of sophisticated stone tools Attirampakkam which is dated 385,000 years ago — which is long before the modern humans are thought to have arrived in India.
M130 research is based on a few people so let's not consider the entire race to be immigrants.

Skeletons dating from around 1800 BCE in Adichanallur suggest that the ancient Tamil civilization is of great sophistication and antiquity.
Researchers say that of the nearly 170 skeletal remains studied constituted
  • Caucasoid 35%
  • Mongoloid 30%
  • Negroid 14%
  • Dravidian 8%
  • Australoid 5%
  • mixed traits 8%

As far as I know, Adichanallur is the only place on earth where all the major race were buried together 3800 years ago. This suggests that people from other parts of the world visited Tamil Nadu.

So I personally believe Egyptians, Sumerians, and the people of Sahul might have got Valari from Tamil civilization.
 

specul8

Ad Honorem
Oct 2016
2,189
Australia
#28
Valari or valai thadi is a throwing sickle used primarily by the Tamil people of India. It is similar to boomerang but made out of Iron.
Interesting, a 'new' weapon (for me) . I can verify the efficiency of a good throwing stick, especially weighted on the far end. It has a surprising range.

As far as sickles go, one weapon I I train with is Okinawan kama

1539718793569.png



It isnt actually thrown, but there is a 'kusuri' version with rope attached



Any thrown hand weapon can be a problem, sai is often thrown, even if it hits the ground in front of you, it bounces up in a wild and unpredictable fashion... usually towards your face .

Another very simple close range projectile (although I 'dont know if Indians ever did it ) is the sandal or loose shoe. More than once I have scored a kill in sword training by flipping my rubber sandal, from a distance, into my opponents face and then rushing in for a kill, while they are 'distracted' . Traditionally, it would have been a wooden clog, not a soft rubber sandal.

1539719355675.png
 
Oct 2018
6
India
#29
Interesting, a 'new' weapon (for me) . I can verify the efficiency of a good throwing stick, especially weighted on the far end. It has a surprising range.

As far as sickles go, one weapon I I train with is Okinawan kama

View attachment 13392



It isnt actually thrown, but there is a 'kusuri' version with rope attached



Any thrown hand weapon can be a problem, sai is often thrown, even if it hits the ground in front of you, it bounces up in a wild and unpredictable fashion... usually towards your face .

Another very simple close range projectile (although I 'dont know if Indians ever did it ) is the sandal or loose shoe. More than once I have scored a kill in sword training by flipping my rubber sandal, from a distance, into my opponents face and then rushing in for a kill, while they are 'distracted' . Traditionally, it would have been a wooden clog, not a soft rubber sandal.

View attachment 13393
Are you allowed to throw sandals in a fight? Lol :lol:

Look at this guy's Valari it looks like an Axe
 
Likes: specul8
Sep 2015
375
Sri Lanka
#30
VALARI IS NOT A MARTIAL ART BUT A DEADLY WEAPON FOR HUNTING !
Valari comes in many shapes and sizes---It was used for hunting and protecting cattle from the wild animals ----However It was used against the enemies only during the British occupation of India ---It was never considered a Martial Arts of Tamils---There were many Age old Martial Arts are still practised by Tamils living in many Lands across many oceans :)
What made the Marudu Brothers a dreaded foe was not just their bravery, but their mastery over the valari , a boomerang-shaped weapon.
Hurled in the air at breakneck speed, it knocked down soldiers of the company’s army. Its threat could be explained by the fact that immediately after the execution of Marudu Brothers in October 1801, the British banned its usage and even offered incentives to those who had handed over the weapons..........................................
-...................Please read the link below

https://www.thehindu.com › News › Cities › Chennai
 

Similar History Discussions