anti-modernity

Dec 2018
83
North Dublin
#1
Is it true that Heidegger viewed the NSDAP as simply another aspect of modernity which would inevitably have lead to the merely functional abyss in which we live today?

If this is the case, are there any philosophers who represents a genuine break with modernity and if so, who is the greatest example of this?
 
Nov 2016
554
Germany
#3
Is it true that Heidegger viewed the NSDAP as simply another aspect of modernity which would inevitably have lead to the merely functional abyss in which we live today?
In fact, Heidegger's "Black Notebooks" (records from 1931-1941), published only in 2014, have shown that he was philosophically completely disappointed by National Socialism, which was itself the spawning of the modern "machinations" he was supposed to overcome, i.e. American technicism. In his opinion, Hitler could not overcome the "modern era" rejected by Heidegger, he could only "complete" it and place it in a new context.

If this is the case, are there any philosophers who represents a genuine break with modernity and if so, who is the greatest example of this?
René Guénon has already been named. Building on his work and that of similarly thinking theoreticians in East and West, the American Ken Wilber has since the 1970s developed what is probably the most complex and interesting philosophy that can serve as a counter-model to the anti-metaphysical or "flatland" (Wilber) concepts of modernity.

It is Ken Wilber's merit to be the first to have developed a model that plausibly and differentiatedly relates and connects Western and Eastern psychological and philosophical systems. By incorporating spiritual dimensions of experience from the teachings of the Buddhist tradition and Vedanta into the upper realms of a so-called "spectum of consciousness", he succeeds in structurally expanding the conventional Western mental theories of the present, which also makes it possible to link classical metaphysical ideas from the occidental tradition of philosophy and mysticism with modern theoretical concepts.

The idea of a gradual construction of the human mind beyond the personal realm has always found its followers and theorists in East and West. His core statement is: the human mind generally contains a potential for development that by no means finds its limit at the level of the everyday subject considered normal today, but extends far beyond it into areas that were marked by mystics of all times as cosmic consciousness or enlightenment consciousness.

Plotin had described the cosmic whole as the One, the Hen, through whose continuous overflow things descend over several stages into being, to finally pass as pure matter into the (relative) nothingness, into the lowest manifestation of the One Being. The realm of everyday human perception comprises the middle zone of this order of stages, without man being separated from the other stages in his being; rather, all these planes are synchronous in him, in his mind and his body, effective and true, even if he is not aware of it.

It is known that Plotin gained this view not only through speculation and the reading of theories, but also and above all through the repeated experience of spontaneous visions, which let him see the true being of being. Of course, many such insights consider an indication of psychotic madness or radical regression into a narcissistic stage of omnipotence, far from even approximating the real of being. Psychoanalysts in particular have such arguments, whose patterns they borrow from Freud. For them, sexual orgasm is usually considered the non plus ultra human happiness and the true heaven above the hustle and bustle of the human world. Of course the mystics know how short-lived, small and low this heaven is. Wilber speaks in this context of Freud's "compulsive preoccupation with sexuality, the only 'juicy' thing the arid flatland world still had to offer".

The reason for the psychoanalytic defensive attitude against transcendental speculation is obvious: it is the legacy of the critical aspect of an Enlightenment tradition that in the three centuries before Freud had been vigorously and relatively successful in eliminating repressive theological thought patterns.
 
Last edited:
Dec 2018
83
North Dublin
#4
In fact, Heidegger's "Black Notebooks" (records from 1931-1941), published only in 2014, have shown that he was philosophically completely disappointed by National Socialism, which was itself the spawning of the modern "machinations" he was supposed to overcome, i.e. American technicism. In his opinion, Hitler could not overcome the "modern era" rejected by Heidegger, he could only "complete" it and place it in a new context.



René Guénon has already been named. Building on his work and that of similarly thinking theoreticians in East and West, the American Ken Wilber has since the 1970s developed what is probably the most complex and interesting philosophy that can serve as a counter-model to the anti-metaphysical or "flatland" (Wilber) concepts of modernity.

It is Ken Wilber's merit to be the first to have developed a model that plausibly and differentiatedly relates and connects Western and Eastern psychological and philosophical systems. By incorporating spiritual dimensions of experience from the teachings of the Buddhist tradition and Vedanta into the upper realms of a so-called "spectum of consciousness", he succeeds in structurally expanding the conventional Western mental theories of the present, which also makes it possible to link classical metaphysical ideas from the occidental tradition of philosophy and mysticism with modern theoretical concepts.

The idea of a gradual construction of the human mind beyond the personal realm has always found its followers and theorists in East and West. His core statement is: the human mind generally contains a potential for development that by no means finds its limit at the level of the everyday subject considered normal today, but extends far beyond it into areas that were marked by mystics of all times as cosmic consciousness or enlightenment consciousness.

Plotin had described the cosmic whole as the One, the Hen, through whose continuous overflow things descend over several stages into being, to finally pass as pure matter into the (relative) nothingness, into the lowest manifestation of the One Being. The realm of everyday human perception comprises the middle zone of this order of stages, without man being separated from the other stages in his being; rather, all these planes are synchronous in him, in his mind and his body, effective and true, even if he is not aware of it.

It is known that Plotin gained this view not only through speculation and the reading of theories, but also and above all through the repeated experience of spontaneous visions, which let him see the true being of being. Of course, many such insights consider an indication of psychotic madness or radical regression into a narcissistic stage of omnipotence, far from even approximating the real of being. Psychoanalysts in particular have such arguments, whose patterns they borrow from Freud. For them, sexual orgasm is usually considered the non plus ultra human happiness and the true heaven above the hustle and bustle of the human world. Of course the mystics know how short-lived, small and low this heaven is. Wilber speaks in this context of Freud's "compulsive preoccupation with sexuality, the only 'juicy' thing the arid flatland world still had to offer".

The reason for the psychoanalytic defensive attitude against transcendental speculation is obvious: it is the legacy of the critical aspect of an Enlightenment tradition that in the three centuries before Freud had been vigorously and relatively successful in eliminating repressive theological thought patterns.
How did Plotin/Plotinus develop as a visionary or was it coincidental? Also, would you consider Eckhart a Christian Plotin?
 

AlpinLuke

Ad Honoris
Oct 2011
25,523
Italy, Lago Maggiore
#7
Is it true that Heidegger viewed the NSDAP as simply another aspect of modernity which would inevitably have lead to the merely functional abyss in which we live today?

If this is the case, are there any philosophers who represents a genuine break with modernity and if so, who is the greatest example of this?
I wouldn't talk about "anti-modernity", but about "post-modernity".

Post-modernism is not modernism, it "completes" it with "insertions" totally alien for rational positivism. Frankly speaking, I'm a post-modernist thinker. Modernism had a limit: human mind. Our mind is not modernist, sure it's post-modernist ...
 
Likes: Rodger

Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,645
US
#8
I wouldn't talk about "anti-modernity", but about "post-modernity".

Post-modernism is not modernism, it "completes" it with "insertions" totally alien for rational positivism. Frankly speaking, I'm a post-modernist thinker. Modernism had a limit: human mind. Our mind is not modernist, sure it's post-modernist ...
Not sure how supporting one of the major forces of modernity would put him in line with Heidegger's anti-modern thought. Maybe he plagiarised some of his ideas, but he could hardly be called a true disciple.
I would classify Satre as a postmodernist, but I could be mistaken. It has been nearly 35 years since I studied his works.
 

AlpinLuke

Ad Honoris
Oct 2011
25,523
Italy, Lago Maggiore
#9
I would classify Satre as a postmodernist, but I could be mistaken. It has been nearly 35 years since I studied his works.
Satre? I guess you mean Sartre ... Satre existed, but if you are thinking to the French philosopher who was born in 1905 ... Sartre is the right surname.

If you are thinking to Sartre, he had the same problem of Einstein: he arrived to early.

How can you be "postmodernist" in the modernist world in the first half of 20th century???? That's the same problem that Einstein faced ... who bought his relativity? Dreamers ...

My questionable opinion is that Sartre's existentialism made his postmodernism less recognizable, but his personal approach to Marxism was postmodern.

So ... if you've got doubts about Sartre as a postmodernist thinker ... you're right. But it's difficult to put his existentialism in a container which is not postmodernist.
 
Likes: Rodger

Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,645
US
#10
Satre? I guess you mean Sartre ... Satre existed, but if you are thinking to the French philosopher who was born in 1905 ... Sartre is the right surname.

If you are thinking to Sartre, he had the same problem of Einstein: he arrived to early.

How can you be "postmodernist" in the modernist world in the first half of 20th century???? That's the same problem that Einstein faced ... who bought his relativity? Dreamers ...

My questionable opinion is that Sartre's existentialism made his postmodernism less recognizable, but his personal approach to Marxism was postmodern.

So ... if you've got doubts about Sartre as a postmodernist thinker ... you're right. But it's difficult to put his existentialism in a container which is not postmodernist.
Yes Sartre. A typo. I view existentialism as postmodernist, but again, it has been years since I studied this.